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REPORT OF TliE COMISSIONERS 



ANOINTED TO 



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WITH THE 



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PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



AT OTTAWA. 




PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE EXE 




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Q IE BEi 
JOSIAH BLA< Ki:i RN, I ^BHigi I ST) I >■ , 

1863. 






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REPORT OF THE COMMISSION 



APPOINTED TO 



mxit into jptters tfoiraectefe 



WITH THE 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



AT OTTAWA. 



PRINTED BJ ORDER OF THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 




QUEBEC: 
JOSIAH BLACKBURN, FABRIQUE STREET 

1863. 



CONTENTS. 



Commission 

Accounts 

Agreement not to apply schedule of prices to extra work.. 

" Clandestine..., 

Amount of work to be done Parliamentary Buildings .... 

" " Departmental Buildings 

Architects. Parliamentary Buildings 

Architects. Departmental Buildings 

Assembly Legislative Chamber, for 

Ashlar Works, fine .. , , , 

Pickfaced 

Boiler Houses, what they are 

Excavations 

Size of 

Item of great moment 

No written order for , 

Garth said to have ordered Aslar work , 

Denies it 

Rubble masonry sufficient 

Ashlar work in useless 

Bowes, J., Comes, 

His measurements 

Instructions from Hon. Mr. Cauchon 

do from Hon. Mr. Killaly 

In connection with Mr. Gundry 

Brick work bad 

Commission, this, opened 

Commissioner Public Works, respecting prices for extra work 

Hon M. Mr. Rose, note of approving prices for extra 
work 

Hon. Mr. Cauchon, letter to Bowes 

Succeeds Hon. Mr. Rose 

Expends all the money 

Sends Hon. Mr. Killaly 

Correspondence with 

Stoppage of work 

Commissioner, Deputy of Public Works : 

Duty of to test cost of designs 

To examine sites, 

Depth of rock 

Test pits 

His want of consideration of plan and levels 

In placing buildings , ,. . , 



11, 23, 24, 
11, 23, 24, 



Pages. 

5 

32, 33, 34 

14 

16 

49 

49 

25, 53, 54, 55 

25, 53, 54, 55 

10 
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. 31 
27 

27, 31 

25, 27, 28 

31 
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32 
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44 

48 

9 

28, 29 

29 

32 

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35 

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Commissioner, Deputy of Pablic Works, — Continued , 

Saw works in progress and sanctioned 

Instructs Law Officers as to Contracts. , 

Again instructs do do 

Gives Schedules of prices to attach to Contracts . . 

Should not have aliowed plans for Tenders to go 
without incorporating plans for heating and 
ventilating. Reasons for not doing 

Contracts : 

Draft of by Department 

" by Law Officers >. 

Instructions to Law Officers 

What they did not contain 

True Copy of heading not given 

Contracts executed 

How it is alleged they were drawn 

Construction of 

Usual clause struck out, , 

Clause about heating and ventilation not enforced. . , 

Garth's Contract, what ->, . . 

Referred to, with departure from in respect to prices. 
Written and Parole 

Correspondence McGreevy, about Nepean facing 

Between Architects and Departments 

Hon. Mr. Cauchon to Mr. Bowes .... 

" Killaly 

McGreevy 

Jones, Haycock & Co 

Council Legislative Chamber, for , 

Size of 

Where situated 

Departmental Buildings, where situated 

Size of . 

What they were to 

Material 

Cost of , 

Accommodation , 

Omissions in 

Style of 

Work on good 

11 done 

Department of Public Works : 

What appears by in reference to Contract 

Ought to have fully carried out scheme of do 

Designs, comparison of 

Style of 

Adopted on conditions 

What climate'required 



Pages. 

51 

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IV 



Designs, comparison of — Continued Pages. 

Probable want of light , 50 

Competition designs had provided for heating and 

ventilation 18 

Description of by Architects It, 18, 19 

Drains, increased depth of 26 

Ducts and Drains, Parliament Building 27 

Departmental Buildings .... , 27 

Rubble masonry would have been sufficient in 31 

anartificial mode of making one over the other " 

All the space between walls of " 

Made solid masonry unnecessarily « 

Utility of ducts outside doubtful « 

Were not required till building advanced . « 

Main one from east Departmental Building " 

Error of Mr. Killaly ia measuring 42 

Estimates progressive. 

Estimates of Hon. Mr. Killaly : 

Mr. Stent's explanation of 

Mr. Fuller's do 

Mistakes suggested in 

Measurement of ducts and drains 

Nepean facing 

Bed and joint brick work 

Scaffolding 

Estimates of Commissioners, how prepared „..., 

What columns in show ' 

Prices on those settled by Architects and Department 

Excavations — enormous 

Commissioner approves on Departmental Building 

Contractors allowed advances on stone as if material delivered 

Used for Pickfaced masonry 

Extra prices, how sanctioned.,. 

Correspondence about 

Mr. Killaly's , 

Allowed by and in Progress Estimates 

Expenditure — alarming in I860..., 

+ Fire proofing 

Fuller, Mr., evidence of 

Explanation of Mr.Killaly's prices 

Foundations— enormous excavations in 

What should not have been excavated 

Erroneous, thick 

Useless , 

Who caused them •. 

Morris 

Grist..... 





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Garth, Chas. — Tender accepted • 

System 

Refused advances 

What his Contract was] 

Denies he ordered work in Boiler Houses and ducts 

Blame unjustly thrown on him 

Gundry, Thomas 

Head, Sir Edmund, selected sites 

His memorandum of for consideration 

Heating and ventilating, separate branch 

Architects acquainted with 

Notices for Tenders for 

Competitors for 

Order in Council giving it to Mr. Garth 

What was excepted in his Tender 

Enormous outlay in 

Description of coil system 

Common and vault , 

How system applied * 

Boiler, where placed 

Operation of Steam 

Pumping return water 

Not necessary when Boilers low 

Vaults for 

Ducts 

Coils heated, how » 

Registers 

Special adaptation to... 

Legislative Chambers 

Ventilating shaft what 

Downward ventilation 

Flues to carry off bad air 

Effectof cold weather on coils 

Long ducts, supposed use of. 

Fans 

Economy compared with expense 

What cost so much 

Reasons of Deputy Commissioner for not incorporating plans 

ofin Contract plans 

Hardpan 

Harper 

Hutchison, W 

Killaly, Hon. H. H., opinion of an omission of clause in Contract about 
suspension ^of work 

Is sent by Hon. Mr. Cauchon 

Instructiens to 



Pages. 

19 

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34 

34, 35 



VI 



PAOII. 

Killaly, Hon. H. H. — Continued. 

What he informs Department 35 

Departmentdo not reply " 

Suggestions respecting " 

Damages for stopping of work 36 

Justifies his mode of measurement « 

Arrangement with Contractors " 

Mode of measurement makes comparisons difficult " 

His decision as to principles of 40 

Measurements, beds, joints, &c " 

Bricks , " 

Cut stone " 

Rates and prices set upon work 37, 38, 39, 40 

How rates arrived at 40 

Mr. Stent's explanation of " 

Nepean stone 42 

Mistakes and errors suggested 42, 43 

Keefer, Mr., duty to test cost of designs 12 

Report upon do examines sites M 

Writes " informal" against McGreevy's tender 14 

Reference to practical head of Department 22 

Reasons for not incorporating plans for heating and ventilating 

with contract plans *« 

.Makes enquiries for other stone , " 

Recommends Nepean 23 

Allows Garth to put his Boiler 10 feet lower . 27 

Makes note that prices of Architects too high 28 

Suggestions concerning prices for Progress Estimates 29 

Approves of prices for Progress Estimates 30 

Memorandum on first Progress Estimates, showing extra work... " 

Correspondence points to agreement spoken of by him u 

Hon. Mr. Cauchon never consults him ; 33 

L arose, Mr. : 

Levels of sites of buildings 10 

Plan of " 

Library, where " 

Size of " 

Logau, Sir fm,, letter of 23 

His opinion about stone 



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Letters to Architects to adopt designs 13 

Modifications required ' 

Leveque 44 

Materials — enquired about limestone and Nepean 23 

Nepean substituted for limestone " 

Durability of Nepean, Ohio, Potsdam stone " 

Measurements — modes of measuring stone, of Toiae 30 

Custom in Ottawa 



<< 



VII 



Pages. 
Measurements — Continued. 

Hon. Mr. Killaly's principles 40 

What extra? what additional ? • •••• 

New ones ordered by Commission - 44 

Who appointed and associated? 

Available for future use 46 

Mismanagement— Allowing work to be begun and proceeded with, 

without order, estimate, or contract ■ 22 

Bowes — Mr. Cauchon to him 32 ? 35 

Money — On hand on resignation of Mr. Rose .'. 33 

Subsequent appropriations 

Hon. Mr. Cauchon expends it all 

Morris, John — Instructions to, sent for 1} 

Asked to inquire about materials 22 

Nepean Facing Sandstone — substituted for limestone, cost of 

McGreevy agrees, Jones & Co., acquiesces 

How measured at first 32 

Explanations of substitution, how it ought to have been 

measured — allowances for 

How measured by Hon. Mr. Killaly . 3? 

Error in, , 42 

Notice — To Architects for designs ,, ll 

What they were to be 

What selected.., 12 

To Contractors for Tenders * 3 

To Contractors of new measurement 44, 45 

Their replies ■ 

To submit claims for damages &*» *> 2 

Replies , 

Orders in Council — Awarding permission for designs 12 

Recommending to adopt their designs ... .. 

McGreevy — the Contract 14, 15 

Fireproofing " 

Sanctioning Departmental Buildings to Jones, Haycock & Co ... " 

Nepean facing 23 

Appropriating $200,000 33 

Page, John — sent 32 

Report referred to " 

Agreement about prices " 

Pattison, J. H 44 

Parliamentary Building — where erected — front of , 10 

Wings of , " 

Legislative Chambers in " 

What they were originally to comprise......... " 

Materials. " 

Cost of " 

Accommodation ,, » " 

Style of 48 

Works on — good— except brick. « s . 



•f 



VIII 



Pages. 
Parliamentary Buildings. — Continued. 

Caused by Larose • * 43 

Work to bedone on " 

Style of construction 

Pelham, Mr 

Pickfaced masonry — made from stone excavated 

Cost of allowance for 

Progress Estimates — Note of Mr. Keefer not to apply schedule prices to 

And they were not — memorandum of Mr. Rubidge 

Paid for till August, 1861, inclusive 

Prices is referred to by Hon. Mr. Killaly 

His prices and former ones not easily compared 

Premium for Designs — Order in Council for 

Plans — Made an assumed ground line 

Agreed to by Deputy Commissioner 

Where to be seen 

For Tenders no time for putting in heating and ventilation 

Adaptation to climate doubtful 

Quoins — Error in specification about Departmental Buildings 

Allowance for improperly allowed in Parliament Building 

Rock Excavations — enormous. 

Rubidge, Mr.. Report of 

Memorandum of on Progress Estimates 

Schedules of prices — No mention of in Tender , 

What they are and how used 

McGreevy to put in one 

His schedule 

Rejected 1 

Refused to put in another 

Agreement not to apply , , 

Architects and Mr. Morris to make statements 

How made 

Departed from — how prices made and sanctioned 

Note of Mr. Keefer and Mr. Rubidge 

Prices by Hon. Mr. Killaly 

Difficulty of dealing with 

Reasons for not applying them 

Schedules of Commissioners : 

Sites of Buildings — selected when ,,* 

By Sir Edmund Head 

Described 

Height of 

Sewers — Depth of increased 

Strength of— Main one for Eastern Departmental Building 

No good reasons for increased length 

Stent, Mr. — Evidence of on heating and ventilating 

Explanations of Mr. Killaly's prices allowed by him 







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44 






31 






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33 


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39, 


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IX 



PAGH8. 

Stone— Durability of Limestone, Nepean, Potsdam, Ohio 23 

Nepean substituted for limestone 

Cost of 

McGreevy agrees 

Jones, Haycock & Co. acquiesce 

Contractors allowed advances on 

Stone from excavation 30 

Contractors allowed advances to use without chargo M 

Supervision bad 48 

Suspension of Works 35 

Tenders volunteer ■ 13 

Form of 14 

McGreevy's 

Oponed with others 

Seven selected 

Peters " 

Commissioners Report upon 

Order in Council on 

Toise— What it is 30 

Of stone — masonry 

Different modes of applying it 

Rubble masonry, Toise of 54 feet 

Water in excavations allowed for 2 ? 

Walls too thick 25 

Useless, wrong 

Superfluous 

Out oi place ' v 

Corbelled over < 

Witnesses examined, commenced 4th August 9 

Works good except brick 48 

Why brick bad in " 

Contractors not to blame for extra and additional but for super- 
fluous and useless M 48 

Creditable to Contractors , 49 

Suspension of 35 

Works extra and additional, prices for 28 

Note of Mr. Keefer on il 

Correspondence about., tl 

Sanctioned by Architects 48, 49, 50-1-2-3-4 

Covered in winter, December 1st 

How carried on in 1861 

Money sufficient for 

Stoppage of 

What enabled Contractors to go on 

Hon. Mr. Killaly's arrangement about 

Works, His principles of measurement 

What extra — what additional 

Rate3 and prices set on by Mr. Killaly 

Rates in Progress Estimates .' 

Column for in Estimate of Commission 



28, 


29, 


30 

33 

<< 

34 

36 

37 
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n 


38, 


3D, 


40 


28, 


29, 


30 
47 



Pagbb. 

Works. — Continued. 

Terms applied to — not correct 47 

Difficulty of dealing about prices for 48 

Reasons for not applying contract prices to extra and additional 

work 49 

Works yet to be done — Parliament Buildings " 

Departmental Buildings 50 



INDEX TO SCHEDULES ATTACHED TO REPORT. 

Pages, 
Schedulh A.— Parliament Buildings. 

Summary of measurement of work done 60 

il u Measurement of work done, &c 61 

tl a. Account of work done and material supplied by Thomas McGreevy. . . 63 

" B. — Departmental Buildings.-— Eastern Block. 

Summary of work done 66 

" u Measurement of work done to Eastern block ... 67 

M b Account of work done, &c 69 

H 0. — Departmental Buildings. — Westbrn Block. 

Measurement of Work done from first floor line upwards 71 

Measurement of work done to Departmental Buildings. 73 

u c Summmary of work done ; 75 

Account of Work done 75 

" D. — Parliambnt Buildings. 

Details of work required for completion 76 

u d. Summary of estimate 98 

M E. — Departmental Buildings. — Eastern Block. 

Summary of Contract works and works required to finish 99 

Details of work required for completion 100 

u F. — Departmental Buildings. — Western Block. 

Details of contract work and works required^to finish 112 

Summaryof " •< " " 122 

«* G. — Parliament Buildings. 

Summary of measurement of work prepared 123 

Measurement of work prepared on ground 124 

t( H. Materials delivered for Parliament Buildings . . 136 

Materials at Briek Yard 138 

li I Particulars of valuation of sheds and plant 139 

li t. Plant in Brickyard, west side of canal 145 

" " east " " 14Q 

" K. — Departmental Buildings, — Eastern Block. 

Summary of work prepared and material delivered at the Eastern block 148 

Measurement of works prepared and of materials delivered 149 

Schbduli L. — Departmental Buildings — Western Block. 

Summary of work prepared and materials delivered 148 

Measurement of work prepared and material? (delivered. .,„..... 151 



XI. 



Pages. 

" M. — Departmental Buildings. 

Measurement of plant at eastern block. . . 153 

Measurement of plant in brickyard 154 

Measurement of plant in western block..... 160 

" " in brickyard 164 

u N. List of certificates issued on account of Public Buildings 166 

" 0. Estimate of external* work 174 

Departmental Buildings. — General summary 174 

Departmental Buildings, — General Summary 175 



INDEX TO APPENDIX. 

Pages. Pages. 

Examined. Recalled. 

Evidence of John Morris 1 — 16 inclusive, 64 — 68 inclusive. 

" Thomas Fuller 16—31 <* 

« ThomasStent : 31—46 " 57,58 " 

" John Grist 46—50 " 

u Alexander Mackenzie 51 — 57 " 

" Thomas Stewart 58—60 « 

« Charles Garth 60—64 «. 

" Joseph Larose 68—73 " 132 

u Jean Baptiste Tison 73 

u Win. Haughy 74 — 76 inclusive. 

" Samuel Keefer 77—89 " 99—105, 125—128 

l« William Coverdale 89,90 " 

" James Baine 91,92 

" James Dyson Slater 92,93 

" Patrick McMahon Burns 93,94 

" Hewitt Bernard 94,95 

" John Rose 95,96 

u Frederick Preston Rubidge 96 — 99 inclusive. 

t* William Hutchison 105—109 " 132,133 

" George Brown Pelham 110—112 " 135 

" Toussaint Trudeau 113,114 

u Thomas McGreevy 114 

" John Henry Pattison 114—117, inclusive, 124, 1.31 

" Hon. Joseph Cauchon 117—119 " 

" John Bowes 119—122 « 131,132 

" Thomas Murray 122 

" JohnRowat 123 

" John Page 123 128 

" Thomas Gundry 129,130 

u Adolphe Leveque 133,134 

" John Harper 134,135 



Exhibits, from page 138 to 227 inclusive, referred to in the evidence. 




PROVINCE OF CANADA. 



MONCK. 



[L. S.] 

Victoria, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, 
Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c, dec., &c. 

To JonN Wilson, of the City of London, in the County of Middlesex, in Our Province 
of Canada, Esquire, one of Our Counsel, learned in the Law ; Victor Bourjeau, of 
the City of Montreal, Esquire, Architect and Builder; Joseph Sheard, of the City of 
Toronto, Esquire, Architect and Builder ; and to Joseph Stark, of the Town of Sorel, 
Civil Engineer, Secretary of this Our Boyal Commission — Greeting : 

John S. Macdonald, TT THERE AS Contracts have been heretofore entered into 
Atty.-Genl. W with Us by divers persons for the erection of Build- 

ings at the City of Ottawa, for the use, occupation and accommodation of the 
Legislature and of the several Public Departments of Her Majesty's Civil and Militia 
Service of Canada, and the same have been thereunto commenced, and are yet 
incomplete and unfinished ; And Whereas the sum of money originally voted by 
the Legislature of Our Province of Canada, for the purposes of erecting such several 
Public Buildings has been largely exceeded, and there is reason to believe that extensive 
and unauthorised departures from the Contracts and the terms thereof have occurred ; 
And Whereas it is desirable that full and impartial enquiry and investigation should be 
made into all matters connected with the designs for the said Buildings and the Contracts 
for the erection thereof and the performance of the same, and of all expenditure, outlay 
and disbursements in any manner in connection therewith. Now Know Ye, that 
reposing especial trust and confidence in your loyalty, ability and integrity, We, of Our 
special grace, certain knowledge and mere motion, and of ©ur Royal Will and Pleasure, 
Do, by these presents, nominate and appoint you, the said John Wilson, Victor 
Bourjeau and Joseph Sheard, to be Our Commissioners for the following purposes : 
To enquire fully into the system of management under which the said Public Buildings 
have been conducted from the time the designs for them were first invited by public 
competition up to the present date, especially whether the plans adopted are of the style 
of architecture best adapted to the climate of this country, and are of the class and 
character of workmanship called for by the Advertisement inviting competitors. If any 
and what Estimates for said buildings were submitted to the Department of Public Wcrks, 
and if so by whom and what action was taken in regard to them ;. whether any alterations 
were made in the plans after they were received and before they were exhibited to Con- 
tractors as a guide for " Tendering," and if so, what those alterations were ? Whether 
provision was made for heating, ventilation, drainage, water and gas supply, and if such 
works were embraced in the Estimates, and to what extent provision was made for works 
of this class ; whether any and what examination was made in regard to the sites of the 
respective buildings, in order to ascertain the nature and character of the foundation before 
the building contracts were given out, and whether it is common or usual to do go for 
large buildings. 



6 



And also, to enquire into the manner and way in which " Tenders" for the Works 
were received, and if the plans and specifications supplied sufficient information on which 
parties could reasonably base their " Tenders V Whether it is usual for a Schedule of 
rates for " extra" and additional works to be appended to " Tenders" and Contracts for 
such a class of works, and if so whether it was done in respect to the works in question ? 
Whether it is usual to adhere to such a Schedule when so appended to contracts, and 
whether it has been adhered to in making payments to the contractors for the works in 
question, and if not, the reasons and authority under which a departure from the Schedule 
rates has been made ? 

Also, to enquire into and aecertain what methods were taken to test the durability 
and fitness of the stone to be used in the construction of the buildings, previous to the 
commencement of the same ; whether such tests were sufficient to establish the quality of 
such stone, and if any substitution of other building stone subsequently took place, upon 
what ground such substitution was made, and what additional cost to the Province, if any, 
resulted from the substitution of one description of building stone for another in the 
progress of the works ? 

And also, Whether the system of heating and ventilation subsequently adopted was 
absolutely necessary or desirable for either or all of the three blocks of buildings ? 
Whether, in view of the limited appropriation by Parliament, the Department of Public 
Works was warranted in recommending or adopting such a system ? Whether it was 
known that the carrying out of the system would be attended with so much outlay as the 
Progress Estimates show, and whether such information was communicated, and if not 
why not to the Government, or to the Commissioner of Public Works ? On whose 
recommendation was the the system of heating and ventilation adopted ? Who made the 
Estimate for it, and if no Estimate was made, whose duty was it to have furnished such 
Estimate ? And also, to enquire into the manner in which the system of heating and 
ventilation has been carried out, and under whose direction, if under the Architects of the 
respective buildings ? then to ascertain their authority, and whether the works were 
examined and how often by an officer from the Depertment of Public Works, and the 
name of that officer, and whether he approved of the works in progress or otherwise, and 
whether the carrying out of the system adopted necessarily entailed so much expenditure 
as the progress Estimates show, and if the same system could have been carried out at less 
expense ? 

And also, to enquire whether the adoption of the system of heating and ventilation 
rendered necessary any other works, and if so the nature of such works, and whether they 
are of a character and extent that the appropriation for the buildings would warrant, and 
under what special or other authority each or all of such additional or extra works were 
undertaken, proceeded with and carried out ? 

And also, to enquire into the various progress and other Estimates that have been 
made and submitted, and the payments made on them or otherwise to the Contractors, as 
well as into all other expenditure that has been incurred directly or indirectly connected 
with the said buildings, by or under the Department of Public Works ? 

And, in case you find that a departure from the Schedule of rates appended to the 
Contracts is warranted by the evidence brought before you from the official letters or docu- 
ments in the Department of Public Works, then you, the said Commissioners will, after 
fully determining what is contract, and what is " extra" or additional work, procuro 
the whole of the work done to be measured correctly, according to the mode of measure- 
ment generally adopted in the locality where the buildings are situated, or at all events 
after such a mode as is generally recognized in this Province, and capable of being readily 
understood, and at rates applicable to such mode of measurement as you the said Commis- 
sioners may determine upon. Contract Work to embrace all classes of work included in 
the bulk sum of the Contract, and to be reckoned in the computation at its relative value 
to the contract sum. " Extra Work" to embrace all the work done to make good defi- 
ciencies in the plans and to be measured as heretofore mentioned, and the different classes 
or work to be allowed and paid for at fair current rates adapted to the mode of measure- 
ment. u Additional Work" to embrace all work on foundations below contract lines. 
Work connected with heating, ventilation and sewerage (not covered by contract) to be 
measured as before stated, and the different classes of such work to be allowed and paid for 



at like fair current rates, according ta the mode of measurement to be adopted. And in 
case your enquiries should lead yon to the conclusion that the contract sum for the 
respective buildings has been or might be remunerative or otherwise to the Contractors, 
you will take the same into consideration, arid the amount of damages, if any, they may 
have sustained or may sustain from the works of said contract having been suspended, after 
they have been paid for all work and materials provided at their relative value to the said 
contract sum. 

And you will consider whether the said Contractors are entitled to remuneration, and 
if so to what amount by way of damages for any " Extra" or additional works which may 
have been suspended after they have been paid for all such work done and materials 
provided at fair current rates. In both these cases you will state your reasons for the 
conclusions arrived at. 

And also, to enquire into the amount of expenditure that will be required to finish 
and complete the three different blocks of buildings according to the designs or plans on 
which they have been so far carried on • and whether it is judicious and for the public 
interests that the works should be proceeded with under the present contracts and system, 
or that the present Contractors should be settled with and the unfinished portions of the 
works relet. 

And also, to enquire into the nature of the agreement made between the respective 
Architects and the Department of Public Works, and the degree of responsibility attaching 
to the said Architects in regard to the progress or other Estimates made and signed by 
them in connection with the works, taking into consideration the respective contracts and 
the Architects instructions from the Department of Public Works ; and whether from the 
evidence and the documents that may be submitted to you it would be judicious, or for the 
public interests longer to continue the said Architects in their present position or otherwise 
and the course you would recommend in regard to the future arrangement of the works. 

And also, to enquire into the degree of responsibility directly attributable to the 
Government, the official head and professional adviser of the Department of Public 
Works, the Architects of the respective buildings and other officers as well as of the 
Contractors in regard to the carrying out of said Contract Works, system of heating and 
ventilation, sewerage and all other works, " Extra" or additional of the contracts. 

And also, to enquire as to whether the mode of management under which the designs 
were received and approved of, the awarding of the Contracts, and how the works were 
proceeded with have been of a nature such as was calculated to lead or has led to the 
economical construction of the buildings, and if it is for the public interest that the same 
uystem should be further continued in regard to the buildings in question. 

And generally to enquire into, ascertain and report fully upon all and every the 
matter connected with the Tenders and Contracts for and the construction of the several 
works connected with the buildings, and every matter and thing appertaining thereto in- 
so far as the same have been commenced and proceeded with or may hereafter require to 
be prosecuted to completion. 

To have and To hold the said office of Commissioners as aforesaid, unto you and 
each of you, during Our Royal Pleasure. And we do further nominate and appoint 
you, the said John Wilson, to be Chairman, and you the said David Stark, 
Secretary of and to the said Commissioners. And it is Our further will and 
pleasure, and We do, in pursuance of the Statute in that behalf confer upon you and each 
of you the said Commissioners the power of summoning before you any party or witnesses, 
and of requiring them to give evidence on oath, orally, or in writing (or on solemn affir- 
mation if they be parties entitled to affirm in civil matters,) and to produce such matters 
and things as you the said Commissioners deem requisite to the full investigation of the 
matters into which you are appointed to examine j And We do hereby enjoin and 
require that a majority of you, the said Commissioners, shall be held to be and be a quorum 
for the transaction of business, and for carrying out the purposes of this Our Royal Com- 
mission ) Of all which Our loving subjects and all others whom these Presents may 
concern are hereby required to take notice and govern themselves accordingly. 



8 



In Testimony Whereof, We haTe caused these Our Letters to be made Patent, 
and the Great Seal of Our said Province to be hereunto affixed; 
Witness Our Right Trusty and Well- Beloved Cousin the Bight 
Honorable Charles Stanley, Viscount Monck, Baron Monck of 
Ballytrammon in the County of Wexford, Governor General of British 
North America, and Captain General and Governor in Chief in and 
over Our Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the 
Island of Prince Edward, and Vice Admiral of the same, &c, &c, &c. 
At Quebec, this Twenty-first day of June, in the year of Our Lord, one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, and in the twenty-sixth year of 
Our Beign. 



By Command, 

A. A. Dorion, Secretary. 



The execution of the within Commission appears by the Report annexed. 



Ottawa, 29th January, 1863. 



John Wilson, Chairman. 
Joseph Sheard, 
Victor Bourgeau. 
David Stark, Secretary. 



COMMISSION 

Appointing Commissioners to enquire into matters relating to the Public Buildings at 
Ottawa. 

Recorded, 26th June, 1862. Lib. K A., Fol 221. 

Wm. Kent, Deputy Provincial Regr. 



KEY TO FOOT NOTES IN BEPOBT. 



Ba., Baine; Bu., Burns; Ber., Bernard; Bo., Bowes. Co., Coverdale; C. ; 

Cauohon; On., Contract. F., Fuller. G., Grist; Ga., Garth. EL, Haughy; Hu., 

Hutchison. K., Keefer. L., Larose. M., Murray; Mo., Morris; McK., Mc- 



Kenzie ; McG., McGreevy 
Estimates ; P., Page. 



Pt., Pattison; PL, Pelham; Pn., Plan ; P. E., Progress 
llo., Bowat; B., Hon. J. Bose ; Bu., Bubidge. SI., Slater; 



St., Stent; Ste., Stewart; Sp., Specification. T., Tison ; Tr. ; Trudeau. 



It having been found that reducing the plans made mention of in the report and 
evidence, to the size necessary to embody them with these documents, would unfit them for 
imparting the information intended; reference is requested to the originals, placed on view 
in the Railroad Committee Room of the House of Assembly. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSION 



APPOINTED TO INQUIRE INTO MATTERS CONNECTED WITH THE 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



A.T OTTAWA. 



The undersigned, who were appointed bv Her Majesty's Commission 1st July, open- 
under the Great Seal of the Province of Canada, bearing date the 21st day of e( commisslon 
June, A.D. 1862, to inquire into matters connected with the Public Build- 
ings at the City of Ottawa, opened their Commission there on the 1st day Examined 
of July last; examined the buildings, ordered the measurements of them, and buildings, 
made the necessary arrangements for carrying out the objects of the Commis- 
sion, until the 4th day of August, when they proceeded to take the testimony Commenced to 
upon oath of the several witnesses summoned before them j continuing the tak 5 n eV A J ^ nc ^ 
same from day to day, till the 10th day of September, when, the measure- con tinued till 
ments of the buildings not being completed, they directed them to be pro- the 19th Sept., 
ceeded with, and adjourned the Commission until further notice. Upon 
notice, the Commission again met at Ottawa on the 18th day of December, 
1862, when it was reported that although the measurements had been com- 
pleted about the 15th day of October, the calculations for the quantities of 
work had not been made up. Thereupon the Commissioners proceeded to Hearl farther 
hear what further evidence was to be heard, and now, at the date hereof, the evidence, 
quantities of work having been duly ascertained and the matter fully enquired 
into and understood, they respectfully beg leave to report to His Excellency 
the Governor General : — 

That the site selected by His Excellency Sir Edmund Head, in the Description of 
end of May, 1859, for the public buildings at Ottawa,' was Barrack Hill,* site - 
one of the points of land formed by the indentations of the Ottawa River, 
containing about 28 acres.f The easterly, northerly, and westerly parts of the 
boundary are steep and rocky, from its intersection with Wellington Street, 
on the east, round to within a short distance of the same street on the west. 
The extreme easterly part is one side of the ravine, containing the first eight B *, . f 
locks of the Eideau Canal, the remaining portion, round to Bank Street,^ is site. 
the precipitous undcrwooded bank of the Ottawa Ptiver. The south-western 
and southern boundaries are Bank Street and Wellington Street, which are 
low* than the ground on which the buildings stand. The land is highest at 
its most northerly point, from which it slopes gradually southerly towards 
Wellington Street. 

* K f SI. 

9 



10 



Height of site Taking as a base, the supposed low water mark of the Ottawa lliver' 

twa an assumed point, about 6 feetabovethe entrance locksill of the Rideau Canal, 

the height of the northerly portion of the ground is 160 feet, its mean height 

on Wellington Street 133 feet.* On the southern line of the Departmental 

Buildings the ground is seven feet lower at the eastern than at the western 

Description of building. The Parliament Building has been erected on the northern portion 

Parliamentary of this land, and has a southern facade of 473 feet, it is flanked by two wings, 

each having towers, and there is a tower at the grand entrance in the centre, 

44 feet by 30 feet at the base, fronting Wellington Street, at a distance of GOO 

feet from it.f 



Building. 



Situation of The Legislative Chambers have not been placed in the front of the build- 

Legislative ing, but in the northern and rear portions of it. They are each 82 by 45 
am ers. f QQ ^ inside, with vaulted roofs 44 feet high from the floor to the spring of the 
roof, and 53 feet from the floor to the ceilings, which are to be ornamented 
and pannelled with glass, through which the chambers will be lighted from 
skylights in the roofs. The Legislative Council Chamber is on the right, the 
Library, Ce- Legislative Assembly on the left of the grand entrance HaH. On the northerly 
soription of. part of the ground the Library has been placed, a sixteen sided building ex- 
ternally, but circular inside, having a diameter of 90 feet in the clear, and 
joined to that portion of the Parliamentary Building which contains the Legis- 
lative Chambers. J 

Departmental The Departmental Buildings are distant from Wellington Street about 92 

Buildings, de- f ee t and are formed thus : 
seription of. 








Ajjtutmmtim 



■/. . /// 




Plan of 
grounds 
levels by 
Slator. 



and 
Mr. 



The eastern one has a frontage on this street of 253 feet, and a front- 
age on the quadrangle of 318 feet. The western one has a frontage on the 
same street of 277 feet, and on the quadrangle of 211 feet ; they are distant 
from each otber 700 feet. A road of 100 feet in width is to be made in front 
of all the buildings, so that, exclusive of the roads, there will be a quadrangle 
of 500 feet in front of them. § The precise form of the ground, and its levels 
at every 50 feet, were marked on a plan, made from a survey by Mr. Slater, be- 
tween the 21st May and the 6th June, 1859, and returned, when completed, 
to the Department of Public Works, of which no use was made when the plans 
for exhibition to tenderers were in course of preparation. || 



for designs. 



Notice to Ar- On the 7th May, 1859, a notice was issued to architects, \ calling for 

chit'ets calling pi ans anc i designs for the several public buildings proposed to be erected in the 
city of Ottawa, to be addressed to the Hon the Commissioner of Public Works, 
which were to be received up to the 1st day of August, 1859, at the office of 
that Department/' In respect to these buildings they were to comprise : 
" 1st. — Elevations, plans, sections, longitudinal and transverse, specification 



* SI. pee plan. t pli4T1 A ' I Plan D ' I PIan A - 



SI. 



f F, St. 



11 



and estimate of buildings for the Provincial Parliament and Library, 
the latter to be fireproof. 2nd. — Elevations, plans, and sections, with spec- 
ification and estimate of the buildings for the Public Departments/' 
For the most approved set of designs for the Parliament Buildings, the sum of 
£250 was to be awarded as the first premium and £100 as the second. For the 
Public Departments £250 was awarded as the first premium, and £100 as the 
second. The plans selected were to become the property of the Commissioner 
of Public Works. The edifices were proposed to be built in a plain substantial sty j e f Du iij. 
style of architecture, the masonry to be coursed hammer dressed, with neatly ings called for. 
pointed joints cut stone quoins, window dressings, cornices, and entablatures. 
The material was to be found in the vicinity of Ottawa. The interior walls 
were to be of brickwork."* 

The Commissioner of Public Works limited the expenditure to the follow- Cost of the 
ing outlay : — For the Parliament House, $300,000 ; for the Departmental buildings. 
Buildings, $240,000. The drawings were to have a motto attached, and to be 
accompanied by a sealed envelope containing the name and address of the 
competitor. On the 11th day of May, 1859, the Department of Public Accoramoda- 
Works published a statement of the accommodation required for the Legisla- tion to be in 
tive Buildings, the Government Departments, &c, for the guidance of them - 
architects preparing competition plans, but this was so ill considered that it 
was afterwards found that nine rooms had been omitted for the Bureau of 
Agriculture. f This omission, with seven rooms still required, was the cause 
of additional work on the north return of the east wing of the eastern Depart- 
mental Building. 

The above notice induced certain architects to submit twenty-three 
separate designs for the Parliamentary and Departmental Buildings ; for the 
Parliamentary Building, sixteen designs by fourteen competitors, and for the 
Departmental Buildings, seven designs by six competitors. 

On the 12th October, J 1859, Mr. Kecfer had sent for Mr. John j^^^ 01 " 

Morris, then employed as Clerk of Works on the University of Toronto, and 

who was afterwards Clerk of Works on these Buildings. On a mode of 

comparison suggested by him, § embracing what were assumed to be ten of the 

principal requisites for the buildings : — 1st. Fitness of plan and interior 

arrangement. 2nd. Economy of construction and cost. 3rd. Adaptation to 

specified and local materials. 4th. Adaptation to site or position. 5th. 

Adaptation to climate. 6th. Economy of warming and ventilating. 7th. 

Lighting. 8th. Beauty of design. 9th. Conformity with conditions in regard 

to information required. 10th. Safety against fire. Leaving out of the J eSidenc ® of> 

• (jrovcrnor 

question the residence of the Governor General, two designs were selected as General not 

entitled to the first premiums offered. That having the motto Semper Pa', atus considered 

for the Parliament Building, and that with the motto Stat nomen in umbra, ^ ere - 

for the Departmental Buildings. 

On the 25th August, 1859, His Excellency, Sir Edmund Head, furnished ^^^^ 
a memorandum to the Department of Public Works, with a view to the Head, 
reconsideration of the report of the Deputy Commissioner, and the Architect, 
Mr. Rubidge. There was much in this memorandum to recommend it to very 
attentive consideration, but the suggestions contained in it seem to have been 
overlooked, especially the one in reference to the rejection of any design 
which would probably exceed the prescribed cost. 



B. B, f Mo. St. K. % Mo. K. § Mo. St. 



12 



Duty of the Before any designs were adopted, it was the duty of the Department of 

Deputy Com- p^}^ Works to have tested the cost of them by taking out the quantities of 

missioner to _ . . J . „° . „ l 

test the cost the works, and putting fair prices upon them, instead of relying^upon any crude 

of the designs, mode of cubed measurement, such as was adopted,* or any volunteer tender 

in confirmation of the correctness of the vague estimates of the competitors 



who offered the designs. 



Report of the O a the report of the Deputy Commissioner of the 27th August, 1859,f 

Deputy Com- accompanied by the report of Mr. Bubidge, the Assistant Engineer of the De- 
1 partment of Public Works, of the 2ord August, an Order in. Council was 



Mr. Rubidjre. 



Volunteer ten- 
der not hona 
fide. 



Duty of De- 
partment to 
have sites tho- 
roughly ex- 
amined. 



made and approved by His Excellency, awarding the first premium to the 
design with the motto ll Semper paratus " for the Parliamentary Building, 
and to the design with the motto u Stat nomen in umbra" for the Depart- 
mental Buildings. It has just been stated what the designs were to be. 
Those selected were civil Gothic, which, as is now admitted by the Architects 
and Mr. Keefer, and which it seems then to have b_en known, could not 
have been constructed for the appropriation. J 

The volunteer tender submitted by the Architects for the construction of 
the Parliamentary Buildings does not appear to have been made by respon- 
sible parties. § The premiums were awarded for these designs by an Order in 
Council of the 27th August, 1S59, but an opinion was therein expressed u that 
noue of them could be accepted without considerable modifications and im- 
provements, and that the prize exhibitors were to be so informed.'*] On 
the 1st September, 1859, an Order in Council was passed recommending "that 
the Architects who obtained the first premiums, should be respectively informed 
that, though these premiums had been awarded, their plans would not neces- 
sarily be adopted unless they could be so altered as to be made satisfactory 
to the Government, and that therefore if they desired to produce this result, 
they should repair to Quebec without loss of time, and confer with the De- 
partment of Public Works there, without any extra charge to the Govern- 
ment."^ Accordingly a letter dated the 9th September 1859, was addressed 
by the Deputy Commissioner of Public Works, to the Architects of the 
Parliament Building, describing the modification required, and requesting 
them to have plans and specifications with forms of tender ready for the 
approval of the Department, by the 10th of October then next, and for the 
inspection and examination of parties desirous of tendering, on or before the 
15th of October, at Toronto, Ottawa, and Quebec.** 

Another letter, dated the 14th September, of the same tenor, was ad- 
dressed to the Architects of the Departmental Buildings "ff 

Having reference to the levels of the ground, which was to be the site of 
the Buildings, and the position of the rock in the neighborhood, as soon as 
the outlines of the ground plans of the Buildings had been settled upon, and 
before the plans were made which were intended to be submitted for tenders 
for Contract, it became the duty of the principal officer of the Department of 
Public Works, to recommend to the Government the necessity of a thorough 
examination of the intended sites, to ascertain the depth of the rock from 
the surface, and its suitableness for the foundations, on the exact portious 
of the ground where the respective Buildings were to be placed, in order that 
the result of the examination might be communicated to tha Architects before 
the plans for tendering were made for the purpose of enabling them to make 



f Mo, K, 



tK. 



t *\ St. K. 



\ * 



i'\ v !. 



M' ! 



13 



the plan strictly adapted to the foundations and to the Buildings as they No such ex- 
were actually to be constructed. No &uch examination, however, took ^ (1 J, n atl ° u 
place, or was recommended, although it could have been accomplished at 
any time, in less than a fortnight, during the summer of 1859, after the 
9th June when Mr. Slater's plans and levels were returned to the De- 
partment.* On the contrary, after the competition plans had been modi- 
tied to suit the requirements of the Government, it was agreed between the 
Deputy Commissioner *>f Public Works, and the Architects, that the plans 
to be exhibited to intended tenderers for the Parliamentary Buildings 
should be made on an assumed line two feet under the assumed ground 
line, instead of the actual one, "f" and that the plans to be exhibited for 
the Departmental Buildings should be on an assumed line three feet three 
inches below the level of the ground floor. As the Departmental Build- 
ings actually stand, Mr. Stent says the foundation of the excavated parts of 
the buildings are nine feet below that assumed line, and in the unexca- 
vated part four feet below it. As the Parliamentary Buildings now stand, 
the assumed foundation line touches the ground in a few places, but the 
actual foundations are for the most part from two to fifteen feet under the 
assumed line on the plans. If the actual ground lines had been given if a c t u a 1 
to the Architects, part of the difficulty which followed would have been ground line 
avoided, and if test pits had been sunk, and the true nature and position of , "® en . glv . e , n 

, / , • i i ill t , i • i o i ant i test pits 

the rock ascertained, there would have been no extra work m the iounda- ma <j e> no ex- 
tions of the Buildings, and such an examination would have shown that they tra work in 
could not have been erected for the appropriation. An attentive consider- foundations, 
ation of the ground levels alone, would have suggested the expediency and 
economy of placing the Departmental Buildings, especially the eastern one, less 
underground than they are, thus obviating part of the rock excavation on 
their sites, and in the ducts and drains leading to, and from these Buildings, 
as well as dispensing with the areas around their basements. 

Before the arrival of the Architects to modify and perfect their plans, and Notice to con- 
on the 8th September, 1859, a notice to Contractors for tenders was published g^f£ ors jggg 
by the Department, stating, that " sealed tenders would be received at that f or tenders for 
Office till Tuesday the 1st day of November following, at noon, for the erection Parliamentary 
of the Parliamentary and [Departmental Buildings i D the city of Ottawa, in ac- aml , , ^^\~ 

j -ii i -!•/>• T-T'-ii • • mental build- 

cordance with the plans and specifications, which might be seen on application i n g S . 
at that Office, and at the Offices of the Architects at Ottawa and Toronto; and 

for information relative to the Parliament Building, parties were to apply to 
Messrs. Fuller & Jones, Architects, Ottawa and Toronto; and with regard to 
the Departmental Buildings, to Messrs. Stent & Laver, Ottawa; and for both 
at the Office of the Department of Public Works." J The tenders were to 

be addressed to the Secretary of PublicWorks, Quebec, and endorsed " Ten- 
ders for Public Buildings, Ottawa," and were to be signed by two or more re- 
sponsible persons, who were willing to become security for the due per- 
formance of the Contract.' Printed forms of tender were to be supplied, and 
no tender was to be received unless in accordance with the form. There is in this 
notice no allusion to schedules of prices being attached to the tenders, but the 
general practice of the Department was to have them attached to, and form part 
of the tender and Contract.§ 

The distribution of printed forms of schedules, and the'exhibition of 
blank printed forms pf contract, showing the application of the schedules and 
the heading of the schedules themselves, clearly indicated that they were 

t ft M. & $ at. g, ? K, 



14 



Schedules of to accompany and form part of the tender. * These schedules of prices are 
prices. Hst>s, in minute detail, of all classes of contemplated work, to which prices arc 

attached, which prices should fairly represent the rates at which the work is 
tendered for, and the rates at which all extra and additional work is to be 
paid for, in case it is performed. They are used for three purposes, 1st, to 
value contract work, for the monthly payments, called " progress estimates." 
2nd, to value extra and additional work ; and 3rd, to value work not re- 
quired to be done, or contract work dispensed with by reason of changes in 
the work, as it proceeds. 

See the ten- When the tenders were opened, it was found that McGreevy's had no 

uor - schedule of prices, and was ambiguous as to fireprooflng, and it was further 

found that the tender of Mr. Peters was for precisely the same sum, but had 
a proper schedule, and was not ambiguous, f In the list of seven of the 
lowest tenders, proposed by the Deputy Commissioner for selection, he wrote 
against the name on Thomas McGreevy's tender the word " informal." J 
In fair dealing, Mr. Peters's tender ought to have been accepted; but if it 
were intended, as the result has shown, that the schedule of prices was not to 
be applied to extra and additional work, then all tenderers should have been so 
informed, and all put upon an equal footing. 

Chief Commis- In his report to the Executive Council of the 17th November, submitting 

sioner did not the seven tenders, the Chief Commissioner stated, " that he did not feel war- 
fee warran e ran j e( j either in reiectini', or entertaining Mr. McGreevy's tender, and there- 
in rejecting or J ^ ft m J J 
entertaining upon, on the 22nd of NoveniDer, an Order iu Council was made that the 

Mr. MeGrec- tender of Mr. McGreevy should be received and accepted for the whole 
vys tender. WO rk, but that he should be called upon to submit the names of new sure- 
tics, and that schedules of prices should be prepared by him to the satisfaction 
of the Deputy Commissioner of Public Works. § In apparent compliance with 
The schedule this order, Mr. McGreevy did send in a schedule of prices, which was not sign- 
he put m. ec i ? Du t W as made on one of the printed forms, and bore upon the face of it, 
that it applied to extraand additional work.jj On examining it, it was found 
not applicable to the bulk sum of his contract, and had been so made that if 
the progress estimates had been prepared and paid upon thesel prices, he 
would have received the whole contract sum before the work was half finish- 
ed ; it was therefore rejected.^ At this point, one of the two things was clear, 
either that he was mistaken in the quantity of work to be done under the in- 
tended contract, or that he was trying to impose upon the government. It 
What Mr. Me- was fair to presume the first of these alternatives, and he should have been 
Greevy should informed that, if" he supposed these prices represented in detail the value of 
have been to t. ^ Q wor j- contemplated by his tender, he was mistaken, and that he must either 
adapt the schedule to the tender or withdraw it, and he should have been 
made to understand that without a schedule applicable to the tender, it could 
He refused to u0 ^ be taken as a tender at all. He refused to put in another, or to have it 
put in another, apply to extra or additional work.** Instead of rejecting his tender, he was 
allowed to temporize and make his own terms, for, as Mr. McGreevy states 
itjff Mr. Kecfer, the Deputy Commissioner, agreed, but as the Deputy 
Commissioner asserts the Commissioner agreed jj that the schedule of 
prices to be attached to the contract should not apply to extra and additional 
work, and as the Commissioner himself states it§§, no agreement was made at 
all, to give Mr. McGreevy any advantage over other tenderers; but it is 
certain, that whoever made the agreement, it was carried out with the know- 
ledge of both the Hon. Commissioner and the Deputy. 

*Ber. f Mo. K. J K, § K. || K. f F. K ** K. 

ft McG. tt K. \\ K, 



15 



Between the time when the schedule of Mr. McGreevy was put in, 
(the 29th November, 1859,) and the signing of the contract, on the 7th 
December, the Architects of the respective buildings and Mr. Morris, were 
instructed lry the Deputy Commissioner to prepare schedules of prices which 
should apply to the bulk sum of the contract for the Parliament Building 
and the Departmental Buildings, respectively, f 

Before anything was done in regard to the preparations lor these ][<>w the scho- 
schedules. Mr. Fuller left Quebec, and they were prepared by Mr. Morris dule3 were 
and Mr. St ent, without Mr. McGreevy's knowledge, and in this way : — !!L a t?!LiJ^I 

' -I-I-1 -I. . cess oi m;i King 

They procured from the clerk, having the custody of them, the tenders which (he™, 
had been opened ; from these they selected three, which they considered 
bona fide and fair tenders;" and comparing them and that of Mr. McGreevy, 
they estimated the ratio of his to be about 35 per cent lower than those 
selected, and taking the average prices of these they made new schedules of prices 
at reduced rates for these buildings to represent Mr. McGreevy's bulk tender. 
Having the quantities of one of the Departmental Buildings, they applied the 
rates to these quantities, 'And found they represented the bulk sum of the esti- 
mate for that building within £500, t and so they assumed the schedules as 
fairly representing the whole of Mr. McGreevy's bulk tender. 

To these schedules, it is alleged, Mr. McGreevy never agreed, § except How it was to 
for the purpose of the progress estimates, and Mr. Morris and the Architects n VV ] y- 
understood at that time, from the Deputy Commissioner, that these schedules 
were not to apply to extra or additional work.|| 

A contract was drawn by the Department on the usual printed form in 
use, but it was not signed. ^[ In the meantime it had been determined to make 
the Parliamentary Building fire-proof, and by an Order in Council of the 2nd 
December, 1859, Mr. McGreevy was to be allowed $48,810 for fireproofmg in 
addition to his original tender. Instead of preparing the contract by the Contract to be 
Department, which had been usual, it was deemed of sufficient importance to fl^Officers y 
have it prepared by the law officers of the Crown. ** Instructions were, there- 
fore, given by Mr. Keefer, to the law officers to draw up a contract between 
Her Majesty, represented by the Commissioner of Public Works, and Thomas 
McGreevy and his sureties, for the erection of the Parliament and Departmen- 
tal Buildings, and among other instructions given was, " schedules of prices 
to be attached." A draft of this contract was prepared, and Mr. McGreevy's See the draft, 
written objections to it had been put in ; but before it was settled he had, on 
the 1st December, 1859, requested the government to let Messrs. Jones & Co., 
have the erection of the Departmental Buildings, to which request the govern- 
ment, by an Order in Council of the 5th December, 1859, assented, and for 
these buildings they thus became the contractors precisely in the place of Mr. 
McGreevy.fj" New instructions were given in writing to the Law Officers of New instrue- 
the Crown by Mr. Keefer, to draw a contract for the Parliament Building, in tl0n , s ° (,raw 
which Mr. McGreevy wss to be the contractor, for the sum of 8348,500, and 
for the Departmental Buildings, in which Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., were 
to be contractors, for $278, 810. ||; In these instructions again, schedules of 
prices are directed to be attached, and the very schedules which had been 
prepared by Mr. Steut and Mr. Morris, on the printed forms, were sent in 
without alteration or remark, to be attached, and they were attached to and 
declared, by the written heading of them, to be part of the respective con- 
tracts, and were signed by the contractors as such, when they executed the 



t Mo. F. St. K. % st - \ K - I! Mo - F - st - If K - ** Ber - K - 

ft K. Ber. %% Ber. 



16 



contracts, on the 7tli clay of December, 18511, without remark or protest of 
any kind, by any of the parties to them.f 

An agreement so important as not to apply schedules of prices to extra and 

additional work, aught to have been of sufficient consequence to appear in the 

instructions to prepare the contract, and if it were really intended, that they 

should not apply to extra or additional work, the contract should have expressly 

provided how, and at what rates such work was to be paid. The Department 

Printed copies of Public Works sent printed copies of the contracts and schedules to the res- 

of contracts pective architects for their guidance, but these printed copies did not contain 

did not con tain ^ worc j s ^ making these schedules part of the contract, nor did they show 

schedule. ' that the contractors had signed them as such/j; They were not in fact true 

copies of the original contract in this respect. 

For this omission the Deputy Commissioner cannot account. § 

As appears by the records of the Department the scheme of public tender 

and public competition wascarried out according to the practice of the Depart 

inent. By the form of tenders and schedules, supplied to intending tenderers, 

schedules of prices were to be put in, applicable to extra and additional as well 

as to contract work, and were required by the Order in Council accepting the 

tender of Mr. McGrreevy, who put in a schedule in the prescribed form.|| 

There were written instructions twice given, and written contracts, in which 

these schedules of prices are mentioned as fairly carrying out the scheme of 

All appears fair tender.^ Everything appears fair, open, just, but behind all is found a 

but clandestine c l anc | es tine agreement that these schedules shall not be applied to extra or 

hfud emeC °" additional work, which no one avows as his act,** but which has been carried 

into effect unjustly as regarded the other tenderers, and unjustly as regarded 

the public interests, as the event has shown. 

Department The Department of Public Works is not bound to any particular mode 

should ha\e f letting work ;■)■■)* but having adopted a particular mode, it ought to have 

fairly ? ar ™J ^ ecn strictly carried out. That the officers of the Department felt this in the 
out their own J m m i •in 

scheme of let- nrst instance, is shown by the laet, that nine tenders were received after 
ting the work, noon of the day on which they were to have been put in ; they were conse- 
quently not opened, and were actually produced before the Commission still 
unopened, to show how impartial their dealings with tenderers had been.|| 
How far this strict impartial dealing was adhered to, in a most important 
point, has just been s'lown. 

IIcw it is al- 
leged the con- Referring to the contracts as execute J, it is alleged§§ that they are so drawn 
tracts were as to carry out the arrangement, by not expressly providing for the payment 
of extra or additional work, at the prices mentioned in the schedule. The 
fourth section of the thirteenth clause, providing for such work, says : — 
" The same shall be allowed to the contractor, not rated by the schedule 
of prices, as is said by the architects and the Deputy Commisimissioncr, 
of contracts" ^ jut at ^ r current rates. "|| If, however, the whole contract be read, and the 
heading of the schedules also, as part of it, then after the word "allowed " 
should be read, " at the rates and prices mentioned in the schedule of prices, 
which schedule is embodied in, and forms part of, the contract." In another 
respect, while he was the tenderer for all the buildings, Mr. McGroevy was 
allowed to make his own terms.* 



f Mo % See printed contract annexed. g K. || K. Ber. f K. Ber. ** K. Ber. 

ft K. XX K. U K. mi F. St.K, *K. 



drawn. 



Construction 



17 



At the time the plans were exhibited to intending tenderers, there was Mr. McGrcevy 
submitted with them blank printed copies of contract in use in the Depart- niakThia^own 
ment of Public Works, aud those tendering were left to infer that this terms in bar- 
form of contract was, in its principal clauses, the one to be used. That the * u g the clause 
Department so understood it, appears from the fact that th^ first origiual draft i*™„ t!f' the 
of the contract was on this form.")* It and the subsequent draft contained a contractors 
clause to the effect, " that in case the amount voted lor this service by the having no 
Legislature should bo at any time expended previous to the completion cla n in J ^ or s |? 8 " 
of the work contracted for, the contractor might, or might not, as he saw fit, p ayme nta if 
on receiving a notice in writing from the Department to that effect, stop the appropriation 
work ; but in any case the contractor should not be entitled to any further exhausted, 
payment for work done, after the service of the notice, until the necessary 
funds should have been voted by the Legislature, nor should the contractors 
have any claim for compensation or damages for the suspension of payment." 
When the original draft-contract was submitted to Mr. McGreevy, he 
objected to this clause, and at his suggestion it was left out. J In this 
respect he gained an advantage over all the other tenderers. And the ftct, 
that this clause was not in the contract, as had been usual, was taken by the 
Hon. Mr. Killaly as the ground for considering, in his judgment, the 
Government liable to the contractors for the amount of such losses as they 
could establish, because of the suspension of the works. § 

Another clause in the contract, in view of heating and ventilating tr ^ts 6 relative 
requires to be noticed. This clause is the ninth, and provides, " that to co-operat- 
Avheuever, or so often, as it be necessary for the contractor to co-operate with ing with con- 
any person contracting for supplying or placing the apparatus for heating the ^e^iins: °* 
buildings, the contractors shall diligently, and under the directions cf the 
Architect; in charge, or the Clerks of Works, perform all such work as shall 
be requisite or proper, on the part of the contractor, for building in, securing, 
and placing in proper position, the flues or other apparatus required for 
heating, in such a manner as to prevent the possibility of fire therefrom, and 
without any extra charg) therefor, and shall be bound in all things to con- 
form to the direction of the Commissioner touching such work/'|| This ^ueti °^" 
clause was never once construed, by any officer of the Tepartment, or by the meaning any- 
architects, as meaning anything, for, as the fact is, the alteration of any wall thing, 
or flue from the contract p^n, to agree with that of Mr. Garth, was allowed 
as an extra, without question, although it is submitted the contractors for 
these buildings were to co-operate with the contractor for heating and 
ventilating without any extra charge, so far as the flues were concerned. 
The competition plans had provision for heating and ventilating, and in 
regard to the system in the Parliamentary Buildings, it was declared by the 
architects in their report, accompanying their competition designs, that*j[ 
" The greatest attention has been given to the warming and ventilating of 
the houses and offices, &c, in connection therewith, and the architects from 
their experience on this subject, in the erection of many important buildings 
in England and elsewhere, are able to guarantee that the system they propose 
would be most efficient. In ordor to obtain a thorough ventilation, it is 
absolutely necessary to provide an ample supply of pure air, to be warmed 
in winter, and vice versa, in summer, and to provide efficient means for 
abstracting the air, as it becomes vitiated. For this purpose, flues are 
provided of sufficient area, according to the dimensions of the rooms, corri- 
dors, &c, both for the supply of the pure air and the extraction of the vitiated, 
and are so arranged that all inconvenience of draught would be avoided, and the 
supply be regulated according to the requirements ; but in a climate such as 



f K. J See Cn. j^B. B, j| See Cn. J F., Report with competing designs. 

3 



18 



Canada, the method for winter and summer requires to be separatel 
described." 

u All the windows having double sashes, and the external entrance s 
and lobbies having double doors, little or no egress for fresh air is to be relied 
on ; in fact, in order to thoroughly warm the buildings, it is necessary to 
guard against it. It is proposed to effect this by a sufficient number of 
apparatus for heating the air, both by steam and hot water pipes, the 
apparatus being fixed in the most convenient situations, and the steam 
forced through the pipes by powerful engines. The houses, and rooms on 
the ground floor, it is proposed to warm by fresh air admitted by shafts from 
the interior into chambers in which the furnaces, with coils of pipes, &c, are 
erected, and the air so heated will be moistened by jets of steam or large 
shallow tanks of water, so that the unpleasant effect of air heated by contact 
with hot metal will be avoided. It will thence be conducted by flues to the 
various apartments, and the apparatus by which it is admitted will be 
provided with guaze wire, so as to distribute it and prevent draught, and 
also sliding valves, so that it may be regulated according to requirements. 
Flues for the extraction of vitiated air would be taken from each room in 
area or number, according to the cubic contents of the room, and carried 
into a flue which would be taken from each' room, and carried into a 
main flue, which would be taken into the nearest ventilating tower or shaft. 
In this tower, immediately above where the flues enter, a small furnace would 
be kept burning (or a sufficient number of gas jets would answer equally 
well), this, by rarifying the air, would create a vaccuum, and cause the 
extraction of all the vitiated air from the rooms, and thus enforce the entrance 
of the warmed and pure air. In the houses and corridors, the chambers 
between the ceilings and outside covering would, when occupied, be kept 
heated by the gas jets, and thus form an additional and most powerful 
extracting flue. It is proposed in all cases, in order to avoid unpleasant 
draughts in the opening of the doors, to thoroughly warm all the corridors 
and passages ; in fact, without that being properly effected, it would be 
impossible ever to obtain a thorough system." 

Summer renti- " The pure air to be admitted from shafts as before specified, and cooled 

lation. by means of fans about five feet in diameter, driven by the engines, and 

thence conducted to the rooms by flues provided for hot air. The system 
of the extracting flues would have to be kept up precisely in the same manner 
as specified for winter use, and by these means the whole of the buildings 
might be kept at a temperature considerably below that of the external air/' 

Open fire- " But in addition to this, fire places are provided for all rooms, and tht 

pUoei. sashes would all be made to open for summer use." 

Baths and La- "The baths and lavatories would be supplied with warm water heated by 

ratones. furnaces, and all the water closets and urinals would have a chamber of hot 

air provided, in which tho pipes would be taken to avoid danger of freezing 



yy 



u The architects trust that the foregoing description supplies sufficient 
lnformntion to give the Board assurance that the subject is understood and 
will be properly treated." 

But Mr. Fuller in his evidence says :* "We had been directed by the in 
structions of the 9th September to put five boilers in the area without the main 



* J. 



19 



walls, but on the 20th September I wrote to Mr. Keefer to say that, on confer, 
ring with the parties who constructed the heating apparatus in the Toronto 
University, we thought two boilers in the central court better than five, and 
to have fans to drive the heated air in winter, and the cold air in summer 
through the building. He answered by telegraph that " our plan for heating 
by two boilers was approved/ " 

Mr. Fuller further says : " It would have been impossible to have prepared 
the plans in time showing the system of heating and ventilating, and as far as 
my experience extends, it was a responsibility not usually thrown upon architects 
in charge of buildings of this extent. Heating is in itself a separate branch 
of construction, and I know of no public building in England which has not 
been done by persons professing that branch of business under the superin- 
tendence of the architects. The plans provided ventilating flues from venti- 
lating shafts, the ordinary fire places, and two large flues for the use of boilers." 

As regards the heating and ventilating of the Departmental Buildings, 
Messrs. Stent and Laver report with their competition plans tha.tf " The sys- 
tem of heating and ventilating to be that in general use in England, known 
as Haydn's patent, or, if preferred, a plan of more local character can be 
adopted, each room to be separately heated by a register and ventilated one 
or more of the most approved valvular gratings, and connecting with the main 
shaft in the centre of the building." 

But Mr. Stent, in his evidence, says{ : « We had not contemplated any ^stent i°n 
complex system of heating 5 we had provided for the ordinary ventilation, evidence. 
Our plan provided a boiler house, extracting and smoke shaft, but we had 
directions from Mr. Keefer to the eftect that the heating of the buildings 
should be left out of the specification and made a separate contract." 

On the 14th day of November, 1859, notices were issued inviting tenders 
for heating and ventilating, which were to be delivered to the Department on 
or before the 30th day of December next, but subsequently postponed till the 
16th January, 1860. § This induced five competitors to give in tenders for the Number of 
work, but by an Order in Council of the 28th January, 1860, it was given to competing ten- 
Mr. Garth of Montreal,|| whose tender was $61,285 for heating and ventilating, ders * 
exclusive of excavation, mason's, and bricklayer's and joiner's work.^f 

In awarding this contract to Mr. Garth, the express terms of the notice 
seem to have been entirely overlooked, for the tenderers were to state a bulk 
sum for which the contractor was willing to supply all materials and construct, 
erect, and put in successful operation all the work, machinery and appliances 
connected with the entire system of heating for each building,** but not- 
withstanding this, his tender was received, which excepted excavations, &c, 
as has just been stated. 

He tendered to put in the heating apparatus and such things as were ne- 
cessary for it and for ventilation, but excepted from his tender the adaptation 
of the building to receive his boilers and apparatus, the excavations, the con- 
struction of the ducts, hot air chambers, flues, boiler houses, and everything 
which it required.ff 

To understand how the enormous outlay connected with the introduction „,°T * ,!*f nor " 
«-, * , , .* . * . , , , ,. mous outlay 

01 the system 01 heating and ventilating was incurred, and how much is wa s incurred. 

t St. % St. § F. St. K. U Ga. f F. St. K. ** See Tr, ff Ga. 



20 



r. r i -i. nnn.-i*iinrr« <-i — 



justly attributable to it, aud how much is not so, it will be necessary to give a 
brief description of it. 

Coil system. The mode of heating embraced by Mr. Garth's contract is the "coil sys- 

tem" applied in two ways, the common and the vault system. 

Common. The common is to have coils of iron pipe in all the rooms and passages 

intended to be heated. The vault system i3 to have vaults or chambers under- 
neath the building in which the coils of iron pipes are placed, and in which 
all the air is heated, and then conveyed through flues in the walls from the 
vaults to every passage and room to be heated. 

These coils of pipe are connected with boilers such as are in ordinary 
Boilers, where use for steam engines. In these buildings the boilers are placed in separate 
placed. apartments called boiler houses, outside the buildings, and are on levels lower 

'han the lowest coil of pipe. When steam is raised in the boilers, it forces 
itself through the coils of pipes which are heated by it in its passage through 
them, and when it condenses returns as water through the lowest pipes di- 
rectly into the boilers. 

Pumring of j n buildings where the boilers cannot be placed under the level of the 

con ensec wa- j oweg |. co ^ ^he wa t e r produced from the condensed steam falls into a cistern from 
which it has to be pumped into the boilers, and becomes cooled by the process, 
the constant pumping of this wator into the boilers entails the expense of a 
small engine to work the pumps; where, on the contrary, the boilers stand 
on levels lower than the coil, economy is effected by getting the water returned 
to them at a higher temperature without pumping. 

No cistern or rp} ie circulation through the pipes is continued by the passage of steam 

quired" 8 * through them from the boilers which returns to them as water. The heating 
system without cistern or continuous pumping is applied to these buildings, 
but the other is spoken of to show what Mr. Garth's plan of placing his boilers 
ten feet lower has accomplished, and what espcn.9 it has led to in its adaptation 
to these buildings. 

Ventilation. Ventilation forms a part of his plan, and is inseparable from every pro- 

per mode of heating buildings. 

Where vaults The vaults or chambers in which the air is heated for the use of the 

are - buildings arc situated in the basements, and are supplied with external air 

through long ducts leading from the edge of the bank and from several other 
points about the buildings. The cold air passing through the.^e ducts into 
the warming vaults comes in contact with the coils of pipe heated by the steam, 
and being heated by the coils passes through these hot air vaults, and flues to 
every room and passage intended to be heated. Every passage and room has 
a register to admit, limit, or stop the supply of hot air at the pleasure of the 
occupant. The hot air would not pass into the imoms without pressure, unless 
means were provided to allow the air already in them to escape and make room 
for the freshly heated. 

Spec : ai adap- The escape of the vitiated air, as it is called, is provided for by ventilat- 

tation of Lc- ing flues and shafts in different parts of the building. To ventilate more 
Chambers to thoroughly the Legislative Chambers and the Library, special adaptation 
ventilate. has been provided by flues near the floor lines, and in the floors of 

these chambers which communicate with what is called the main smoke 
and ventilating shaft, a column of masonry 15 feet square and to be 128 



21 



eet in height.* In the centre of this shaft are two iron smoke pipes, Dweriptioo of 
each two feet in diameter, to take the smoke from the fires under the ^tuition, 
boilers. The heat from the smoke pipes communicates with the air in 
the shaft around them, and causes an upward current from the base of the 
shaft which has no external opening other than these flues from the Legis- 
lative Chambers and the Library, the vitiated air from which passing off down- 
wards to the base of the shaft, then upwards through between the walls of 
the shaft and the iron smoke pipes to the open air. This contrivance is called 
" the downward ventilation." 

The Legislative Chambers and Library, as well as all the other rooms These chain - 
in the Buildings, have flues, however, th: ough which the heated and vi- r °* mg an h ^ ye 
tiated air passes upward to the other ventilating shaft of the Buildings These flues for escape 
arrangements embrace the whole system of heating and ventilating, but expe- of air upwards, 
rienee has shown that drawbacks exist in its practical operation. 

In cold weather, the first coils which come in contact with the external 
air in hard frost, have the steam contained in them suddenly condensed, the 
water freezes, and stops the circulation, by which all the pipes and coils 
cease to act. 

To obviate this, Mr. G-arth's system is to allow the external air to pas s 
through long ducts,")" to modify its temperature as he supposes, before it 
reaches the coils, so as not to freeze them. Hence his desire to have long 
ducts constructed as essential to the proper working of his system. These 
ducts, he supposes, will obviate the necessity of faus,J which are required to 
force the air into the warming vaults, and through the Buildings, when the 
external air is brought down through shafts close to the Buildings. 

These fans are constructed on the same principle as those used for winn- Fans for draw- 
owing, but specially adapted for the purpose of forcing into the warming ing air * 
vaults and flues, a large volume of air. The fans are driven by a steam en- 
gine, which will not be required if this system succeeds, but in ca»e of its not 
succeeding, provision has been made in the construction of the main duct, 
for the Legislative Chambers, for the introduction of a fan into it if required, 
at the expense of the Government. 

A steam engine in any event h^d to be attached to the boilers to furnish 
them, and the cistern on the top of the buildings, with water,§ and the small 
economy in the expense of pumping the condensed water from the steam-pipes 
into the boilers again, was nothing compared to the expense of deepening 
the boiler houses ten feet in rock, in all the buildings, lining their sides 
with ashlar masonry, deepening the main drains of the buildings in rock, and 
constructing the main sewers in them all, ten feet below their intended levels || 
In point of economy too, the consideration tWt the temperature of the air Economy enor- 
in passing through the long duets into the warm air vaults, would be so modi- mously out- 
fied as to preveut the steam coils from freezing, and the dispensing with the wei S Ded . in 
engine for driving the fan,*|f is enormously outweighed by the fact that these pec?.^ W *" 
external ducts have be:n constructed at an outlay of $76,751.01 in all the build- 
ings. Mr. Garth's contract was to put in the boilers, coils, registers ai:d every- 
thing connected with the heating apparatus, but he had nothing to do with 
the air ducts or flues, or the adaptation of the buildings to his system.** 
It was the excavation for the boiler houses and air ducts, the masonry in them, 

* Mo. F. f Ga. J Ga. § Ga. |J Me, F. St. K. fl G». *» Ga. 



22 



What^ Mr. an d the constructing his smoke and air shafts, ventilating flues and shafts, 
tract^was eon ~ together with the additional depth of drainage required, which have cost so 
•normous a sum.* The system, however proper, as such, and however mnch 
Mr. Garth's contract was within the appropriation, could in no way justify, 
in the mere adaptation of the ducts and buildings to it, an expense equal, as 
the event has shown, and as ordinary prudence could have foreseen, to 
$333,000, including work in and exterior to the buildings. 

Grave feature The gravest feature in the whole mismanagement was, that the works con- 
in mismanage- nected with the heating and ventilating system were allowed by the Deputy 
aifowin^these Commissioner to be undertaken, proceeded with, and paid for, without esti- 
works to be mate being made or called for, without a contract, without any check, any 
proceeded schedule of prices, or any arrangement whatever as to terms or price of work.t 
for without es- ^e extraordinary expenditure was shown by the monthly estimates for the 
timate, or any year 1860, for they exhibit extras, amounting to the sum of $311,420,J 
arrangement which could in no way be accounted for, by the mere fact, of extra excava- 
a out prices, tion, and extra work under the assumed foundation lines of the buildings. 
Considering the extent of work required for this system, and the complica- 
tion it was likely to produce, it was the duty of the practical head of the 
Department of Public Works, not to have allowed plans for the buildings to 
be exhibited to tenderers, until that for heating and ventilating had been ma- 
turely adopted, and incorporated with the plans, and in the specifications for 
the construction of the buildings. This was not done, nor was any precaution 
whatever taken to prevent the confusion, and vast amount of extra and addi- 
tional work which subseqnently took place. 

f^d* ! ras re " In connection with this, while extra work was being performed without 

while all this order or estimate, and paid for to the other contractors from month to month, 

expenditure during the working season, of 1860, to the amount of $103,108, in anticipation 

was going on. of Mr Goth's contract, which was not signed till the 12th January, 1861, 

although his tender was accepted on the 28th day of January, 1860. In reply 

to his application for advances in the meantime, he was informed that nothing 

could be paid to him, for anything he had delivered or done, until his contract 

was signed.§ 

Reasons of De- The Deputy Commissioner alleges that if all the plans had been perfected, 
p.uty Commis- an( j a j] ^ e usua j an( j necessary precautions adopted, in reference to the con- 

sionor tor not ±. * 

incorporating struction of these buildings, little could have been done till the summer of the 
the plans for year 1860,|| indeed nothing was done or could be done until the plans of the 
heahng and buildings and those of Mr. Garth for heating and ventilating were incorporated, 
withM^otber during the winter, and up to the 12th of April, 1860, when they were so far 
plans. matured as to admit of the masonry going on.^f 

9th September, On the 9th of September, 1859, Mr. Morris had been requested by Mr. 
1859, Mr^Mor- j£ ee f er ^ inquire into the character of the materials available in the vicinity of 
to enquire into Ottawa, for the Public Buildings,** and although the Nepean sand-stone was 
materials in known to exist in the neighborhood, for want of practical industry he failed to 
Otta V1 a nity ° f discover l % anc * on fcne 4th day °f October reported his views,f f in which 
this sand-stone is not spoken of, but Gloucester limestone is suggested as the 
stone available for the purpose. The very dark colour of this stone, as well as the 
want of durability, which had become manifest in the decay of the Locks and 
Sapper's Bridge of the Rideau Canal, where blue lime stone of a similar charac- 
ter had been used, induced the Deputy Commissioner to cause inquiries to be 



* Mo. F, St. f F. St. K. Ru. t P. E. I Ga. K. \ K. f Mo. F. St. 

«* Mo. K. tt Mo. 



23 



made for other stone in the neighbourhood,* and in a heap of stone brought in Enquiries for 
for this purpose, was this light coloured hard Nepean stone, which was at once p e pu ty y c om - 
pronounced upon, as that best adapted for the style of the buildings, for colour, missioner. 
durability, and the resistance it made to the action of fire. At the suggestion 
of the architects, and the Deputy Commissioner, it was determined this stone 
should be used, instead of the Grloucester blue limestone, f On the 15th Feb- 
ruary, 1860, Mr. Morris was requested to state his views : — 1st., as to the 
quality of the Nepean andTempleton stone, its architectural effect and dura- 
bility, as compared with the limestones and, 2nd., his opinion as to the differ- 
ence of cost.J On the 22nd February, 1860, he made his report, which is pub- 
lished in the blue book, page 259. He makes out the difference in cost between 
the Gloucester and Nepean stone is to be 21 cents per cubic foot, and recommends 
the sandstone as judicious, at the same time suggesting that the expense might 
be properly charged to the general item of precaution against the effects of fire. § 
On receipt of this letter, and the letters of Messrs. Stent & Laver, of the 25th 
January, 1860, Messrs. Fuller & Jones, of the 27th January, and of Sir Wil- 
liam Logan, of the 18th February, Mr Keefer recommended the substitution 
of Nepean stone for the limestone, in his report of the 28th February, 1860. 

The Chief Commissioner in his report of the 10th March, saw no reason for Chief Commis- 
changing the materials determined upon, and specified in the contract, but by sioner SGQS no 
an Order in Council of the 2nd June, 1860, the substitution was determined chanore# 
upon, and the contractors were to be called on to assent to the change, and 
to agree to the difference of estimate in the expense, (21 cents per foot,) and 
also to agree that the present contracts should remain in every way intact."|| 
Tq this rubstitution, and the price authorized for it, Mr. Mcdreevy expressly 
agreed, by his letter of the 15th day of August, 1860, in which he says, " I ^ r ; e McGre !^ 
agree to the change, and accept the price mentioned, viz : 21 cents per super- i e °tter marked 
ficial foot."T 107. 

Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., did not expressly agree as he did, but they Messrs. Jones, 
began the work, and carried it on, and to this extent they acquiesced in the Haycock & Co. 
change, at the price stipulated by the Government. No tests** were applied ^"sce by* do" 
to try ths durability of the stone used in the buildings, but Sir William i ng the work. 
Logan's letter, referred to, expressed his opinion in favour of that formation, of 
which Nepean sandstone, and Brockville stone are composed. ff 

Potsdam red sandstone is used in the relieving arches and mosaic wcrk 
over the windows, the enduring quality of which is unquestioned. The dura- Ohio stone, its 
bility of Ohio stone, seems not to have been tested or questioned, though grave durability 
doubts arise in the opinion of the Commissioners whether it will stand in the S oub i? d an t d 
plinths exposed to the water from the roofs, and exposed weatherings, and sus t a in great 
whether it will sustain great pressure, unless on its natural bed, such as will weight. 
occur in the arches and weatherings under them, in the base of the main 
tower. 

There seems to have been no perfect understanding with the Architects 
and the Department as to their renumeration, their duties, and responsibili- 
ties. As regards their renumeration they say, Mr. Keefer agreed they were to 
have five per cent on the outlay. JJ True, there was an Order in Council 
limiting their renumeration to $33,000, — but they say they never assented to 
it, and claimed from Mr Rose, and yet claim to be paid five per cent on the 
whole outlay, as their right. In this view of their claim to renumeration for 



* K. J P. St. K. X Mo. I Mo. II B.B. % See McG's letter. 

**Mo. It St. &F. 



24 



What was ex- all expenditure, and in view of the express provision of the contracts,* that 
pected from nQ extra wor k whatever should be done without the written authority of the 
of this unset- Commissioner of Public Works, given prior to the execution of the work, or 
tied claim to any allowance, or payment whatever be made for the same, in case it should 
per centage. be ^one without such authority ; it was their duty not to have allowed any 
work to be done, or recognized any claims made for it, without such written 
authority of the Commissioner, and yet nearly the whole of the extra and ad- 
ditional work was undertaken and done, as if no such clause in the contract 
What they al- existed. They allege that their dutyf as r« gards the correctness of the foun- 
lege in refer- dation and othe" walls was performed when they furnished copies of the con- 
duties* t Cir tract plans, placed in an office open to all concerned, on a scale of 10 feet to 
an inch for the Parliamentary Buildings, and 12 feet to an inch for the De- 
prrtmental I'uildinga, figured only as regarded their exterior dimensions, 
east and west, north and south, but the sizes of the rooms and the thickness 
of the walls not figured upon them, and that they were not bound to give, and 
did not give any plans of the foundation walls, or figured plans of the basement 
and other floors of the buildings. 

CI i exemp- They claim to be exempt from responsibility for mistakes and errors in 

Hon from res- construction, and for correctness of measurement, because they had not the 

ponsibility be- nomination of clerks of works, and from the fact that Mr. Morris, the chief 

cause they ha c ] er k f the works, although nominally under them, was in their opinion over 
notthe nomim- . .■». n t n i • . . r . , . . 

ation of clerks them, having the ear ot the Government, and in communication with it, m- 

of works. stead of them, and in charge of the grounds independently of them. J 

If Mr. Morris usurped authority which did not of right belong to him, 
and ordered work, as he avowedly did, on his own authority without their ex- 
press orders, or if he were unequal to the duties he undertook to perform, it 
was alike due to their own position, and the duty they owed to the Govern- 
ment, promptly to report it, which they omitted to do. 

Architects ne- The architects never did in fact, measure any of the work,§ although from 

ver did mea- t ne monthly estimates signed by them, it would be inferred 'they had done 
so. Mr. Morris had no correct measurements or sections of the rock excava- 
tions, nor had the architects. || It is said the book in which the measurements 
Book was lost, were entered for the greater part of the first year was lost,^[ but at the same 
time, they are admitted to have been only approximate ones, the quantities 
being tliose put into the progress estimates. 

G . . , Mr. Grist had a copy of a large portion of this book, but it furnished 

copy of most of n( > definite information.** Mr. Morris says he intended in the winter of 
it. 1860-61, to have gone over those measurements j but never did. ff Much has 

been said about the loss of this book, but it is fair to say, that it was more likely 
to disappear from the little it contained, and the little consequence it possessed, 
than from the information it could have given. The architects trusted to the 
competency and care of Mr. MorrisJJ to see that the foundations and all other 
portions of the buildings were properly laid out from the plans furnished by 
them, but he greatly neglected his duty in this respect. 

Architects did The architects of the Parliamentary Buildings especially, never themselves 

not test the tested the correctness of the walls till they had been carried up to the level 

waUs^at "first °^ tne Dasement an( ^ ground floors, and then they discovered, with surprise, 

' that many of them were wrong, — many out of place, some useless, many too 



* See Cn. f F. St. % F. St. g F. St. || Mo. F. 'F. *» Q. 

ft Mo. tt F- St. 



5 



thick,* — and they then betook themselves earnestly to set them right by causing 

new walls to be built, others to be thickened to suit the upper walls, others to 

be corbelled over, all presenting the consequences of gross want of attention in 

the first instance. Mr Morris, on being questioned, admits he laid off the WhatMr.Mor- 

walls of the Parliamentary Building, encircled by a black line, marked by him [^.i^',, 1 "'^ 

on the plan I). This plan shows at a glance, by the light blue coloring, what 

the walls are as executed; and by the dark blue, what they were intended to 

have been by the contract.! 

He does not know who laid out the portion not done by himself; he thinks 
li it was Grist, or the contractor's foreman, ; '| but he alone wai charged with this 
duty. Mr. Grist denies laying out any.§ The contractors foreman admits McGreevy's 
laying out some, and says Mr. Grist and Mr. Morris did the rest; but that he, ount of how 
having no directions, and being unable to obtain any from those who should t'ia Avails wero 
have given them, did not stand about the thickness of the walls, or the exact made, 
correctness of their position, and being in the interest of the contractors he 
would not keep the men idle. He made the walls thick, and where chimney 
breaks were shown on the plan, they were built solid across the whole wall, be- 
cause it was easier, — in using the rough stuff to doit, and no one objected to 
it. || Mr. Morris, Mr. Grist, the architects, all agree, that right or wrong, un- 
necessarily thick or not, corresponding with the plan or not, all that was done 
was measured and allowed for in the progress estimates.^ Mr. Bowes and 
Mr. Pattison say they measured all such work for the Hon. Mr Killaly's esti- 
mate. * * 



Mr. Morris was sole clerk of works for all the buildings up to the 19th -SiMrMor- 
day of April, 1860, when Mr. William Hutchison came. They two were clerks Y is was ' solo 
of works till the 20th day of June, 1860, when Mr. John Grigt was appointed.ft clerk of works. 
The Department of Public Works supposed that Mr. Morris would be sufficient 
to superintend all the buildings during the first winter ; JJ but this would have 
been a charge too heavy for a man of much greater practical abilities. No one, 
however capable or energetic, could have properly done the work thrown upon 
him, up to June, 1860. He assumed the right and power to give instructions Assumed too 
to do work, which neither the contract nor the circumstances warranted. As much power to 
instances of this, he directed the foundation of the principal staircases to be of so- 
lid masonry; §§ and he directed or sanctioned most of the superfluous and unne 
cessary rock work in the excavations, and most of the useless masonry in the 
foundations. mi Over a large portion of the interior of the building, the rock R° ck exeava- 
was near the surface. In making the air-ducts it was necessary to blast it in 
two directions, but without any authority from the Department, Mr. Morris 
allowed, if he did not direct, this whole rock to be excavated deeper than was re- 
quired, and kept no correct measurements or sections of it,^f^f so that about 1,700 ^° seef 10 ? 3 
cubic yards**'" are claimed by tho contractor over and above what is admitted measurements! 
to have been done by the clerks of works; and as already stated, no sections 
were made at the time, to be kept on record as the correct dimensions and 
shape of the excavation. By the regulations laid down in the first instance, and No extra work 
indeed by the terms of the contract, no extra work was to be done without the was to be done 
written order of the architects, approved by Ihc Department. "j"j"j" There never was t(m or ^ m J " f 
any written order by any officers of the Department to excavate rock exterior 1o architects, ap- 
the buildings jjjt but there was the verbal order of the Deputy C jmmissioner proved by De- 
to excavate it to a limited extent in the interior ;§§§ and yet, in defiance of the par men ' 
terms of the contract, and of these regulations, the work was allowed and paid 



t See Pu. % Mo. I G. || H. 

XX K- U Mo. || j| H. Bu. 

ffiK. 

4 



f Mo 3 F. St. G. ** Bo. 


pt. 


-ff Mo. G, 


f Mo. *** Bo. 


ttt 


See Cn. 


Ml» 







26 



for in tho progress estimates, from mon'h to month, to the extent shown by 
Contract also these estimates. 5 '' The contracts provided that no extra work was to be per- 
pron ed tun. f* orilie< £ T^itljoixt orders, and an order-book was provided for the purpose.f The 
first and only order ever given in compliance with this stipulation for the 
Parliamentary Buildings, was on the 12th day of December, 1859, but delivered 
to the contractor on the 14th day of February, I860. Tt is as follows: — j 

Ort«r. " You are hereby requested to excavate the ground for the various founda 

tious down to the surface of the reck, and also the whole area of the central 
court, and all the trenches requisite for the cold air-ducts in connection with the 
warming apparatus; and leave openings for the doors in the basement walls of 
the rooms in the front part of the building, so as to give access and fit them 
for future use, should they be required ; giving them light also, from without, 
aud fire-places within, as shown ou the working drawings." 

The first and only order ever given for the Departmental Buildings, was 
on the 10th December, 1859, but delivered to the contractors on the 10th day 
of March, 1860, as follows :— § 

u You are hereby requested to continue the surface excavations under the 
suites of rooms of both blocks of Depuitmental Buildings next Wellington street, 
to admit of future use of those portions of the basement; a!eo to excavate 
trenches for all walls, piers, &c, of both blocks down to the solid rock, and 
to level the same; and also to excavate for boiler houses and other work con- 
nected with the contract for heating and ventilating; continue the Walls down 
to the rock in every case, and make door-ways, windows and fire places in the 
suites of rooms in those portions of the basement above mentioned/' 

No one reading these orders could imagine that the excavations were io go 
deeper than the rock or exterior to the buildings; but they are the only written 
authority upon which the enormous rock excavations were made. 

Instead of going to the reck only, or confining the excavati< ns to the 
foundations ofthe buildings, rock excavations were made, — 

In March, I860, to the extent of 5,434 cubic yards, 811. 345.55 

In April, " " 4,031 

In May,' « " 6,468 

In June, " « 8,732 

In July, " " 3,455 

August and September, 9,602 

October and November, 2,529 



u 


7 540.05 


a 


17,087.95 


a 


15,342.75 


tt 


, 9,500.55 


u 


26,107.55 


a 


9,055. TT) 




$95,986.15 



Total, 40,251 

As shown in the progress estimates. || 

Strict regard With reference Io the classes of extra work in the progress e.,ti- 

not paid to mates, strict regard was not paid to the terms used. A great deal 
terms in pro- f excavation was classed as "hardpan," which, was not so in iVct.^f 
grew ea ana . £| n y w hich was harder to excavate than ordinary, by reason of it 
being mixed with gravel or boulders, was called tl hardpan j" so was frozen 

•StfM. tMo. J P. | St. || See P. E. ^ Mo. 



27 



earth.* That there was, iu seme instances, water in the excavations, is said to Water in cx- 
have induced the allowance of extra prices; but it will be found that pump- ^lowe^forT* 
ing this water forms an item in the extra day bills in the same progress esti- 
mates,)* to which reference must be had for the details of the expenditure 
for extra and additional work, as well as the filling in of earth in the founda- 
tions,}; for which extra prices were given, for ramming, while at the same lime 
this ramming also was allowed for in the day bills.§ 

The vast extent of the excavations in regard to ducts, drains, and boiler Reference to 
houses, will be best understood by referring to the plans marked G, L and J^ere ducts 
M,|| which show where these are situated, how they radiate from the Build- drains, and 
ings, and go through them, and to the sections of them to show their depth boilet houses 
and width and the useless and extensive amount of masonry, and their 
erroneous construction To enable Mr. Garth to dispense with pumping 
the condensed water, he asked the Deputy Commissioner if his boilers could 
be placed ten feet lower than the level of the basement floor Without con- 
sidering what additional expense it would entail, he was told by Mr. Keefer 
that he could ; "-J" and forthwith the exeavations for the boiler houses were Boiler houses, 
directed by the architects to be made ten feet deeper in the rock. The oue J iad S17,e of .? x ~ 
in the Parliamentary building is 85 by 79 feet, that in the eastern Depart- in'ti^m. 
mental building 42 by 31 feet, and in the western Departmental building 40 
by 40 feet; ** all 10 feet deeper in the rock than originally contemplated. 
This increased depth required the main drains to be ten feet deeper than 
before. 

The one from the eastern Departmental building Avas made 385 feet . 
long, 22 feet deep, 14 feet wide at bottom, 25 feet w T ide at top The one from 
the western Departmental building 418 feet long, 25 feet deep, 15 feet wide 
at bottom, 22 feet wide at top, and that from the Parliament Building 396 
feet long, 15 feet deep, 9 feet wide at bottom, 17 feet wide at top. These are 
the average dimensions of them. 

There are in the eastern Departmental building three air ducts leading 
from the west front 9 feet below the surface of the ground. They were sup- 
posed to come out level with the ground in the terrace wall, but the building 
having been sunk so much lower in the ground than was originally intended, 
there cannot now be any terrace, consequently they must terminate iu a shaft, 
and will require to be drained, as no provision has been made for drainage, 
otherwise they will have to be abandoned.")")" 

In excavating for these ducts through the Parliamentary building, it is What ah onl( * 
said the rock was shattered, and, immediately the whole of the rock within ^ e 8 ^^ d C j. 
the building was verbally ordered by Mr. Morris, under the direction of the cavated.; 
architects, to be excavated. t| 

It was proper to excavate the rock for the outer foundation walls to 
the depth of three feet, from the surface, but beyond this depth, and for the 
interior foundation walls, it was unnecessary. To the extent of about 0,370 
cubic yards, rock excavation was required to be moved in this view of it, but 
there w r cre instead about 13,175 cubic yards of rock excavated in the in- 
terior'of the Parliamentary building. Iu all the buildings it has just beeu 
seen that, inclusive of ducts and drains, 40,000 cubic yards were excavated as 
extra work, as the progress estimates from time to time showed. §§ All the 



* Hu. f Hu. % See P. E. g Hu. J See Pus. ft Ga. ** Measts. by Coma, 

ft See Pa. # Mo. F. St. < ft See P. B. 



an cs- 



28 



extra work mentioned in these estimates was allowed and paid for with iittle 
question or remark, except as will be immediately noticed, to sanction prices, 
and a departure from the schedule of prices attached to, and forming part of 
the contract. * 

Before any extra work had been returned, and in anticipation of it, a How extra P ri " 
correspondence between the architects and the Department took place. It is tioned. 
of great importance as showing that the schedule of prices attached to the con- 
tract, was not intended to be applied to extra and additional work, and that 
the Hon. Mr. '{Rose had this matter specially before him. f The first letter 
is from the Secretary of Public Works to the Architects of the Departmental 
buildings. It is dated the 7th February, 1860, and states as follows : — " In n , 

reference to your letter of the 1st instant, on the nature of the soil for the site ence. 
of the right hand| block of the Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, I am direct- 
ed by the Hon. the Commissioner to inform you that he approves of carry- 
ing the foundation down to the rock in all parts of the right hand blosk 
of the Departmental buildings, but before the order is given for it, he desires 
to be furnished with an estimate in detail of the quantities of masonry and j) es - ireg 
the prices at which the extra work is to *be estimated, which with the assis- timate first, 
tance of the clerk of works you are desired to prepare and send to this Office/ 7 

To this on the 28th February, the Architects send the following reply : — Reply of Ar- 
" Referring to your favour of the 7th inst., requesting to be Tfurnishcd with a chitects of De- 
detailed statement and prices for proposed extra depth of foundation to the partmental 
rock of the right hand Departmental building, we beg to say that we find 
it impracticable to furnish you with the precise quantities of work, owing 
to the uncertain level of the rock, but annex herewith the prices on which our 
calculations for the extra work have been made." 

" We have reason to believe on further examining the ground that the Estimated pri- 
approximate estimate which we furnished in our communication of the 1st ces ' 
instant, will not be exceeded. Masonry'per toise of 72 feet in trenches, 
S9.66. Rock excavation in trenches below 5 feet, $1.90. Rock excavation 
to 5 feet, 81.25." 

A note on the back of the above signed IS. Keefer, 5th March, says : — *i ot ° of ^ Ir - 
" I do not approve of these prices ; they are too high ; when the work com- too\teh! 
mences, the opinion of the clerk of works should be asked." 

The next in order is again from the Architects of the Departmental Architects of 
buildings to the Commissioner, and of date March 12th, 18G0. It is as fol- g^dklT^to 
lows: — "We are in receipt of your favour of the 8th inst., informing us Department of 
the Deputy Commissioner does not approve of the \ prices given by us for ex- works, 
tra walling and excavation, which we had the honour of submitting to you 
in 3 our letter of the 28th ult. We beg to say that the prices were arrived 
at in a conference with Messrs. Fuller & Jones, Mr. Morris, and ourselves, 
held with the special purpose of arriving at prices for extra work, the decision 
and prices being entered in the minute book at the clerk of works office, and 
applying equally to both theParliamentary and Departmental buildings, the 
toise of 54 feet being used [in the Parliamentary building, and the local toise 
of 72 feet adopted by us, the prices being in the same proportion. 

" We take the liberty of suggesting that a schedule of prices for extra 
work shall be prepared by the several architects employed in the Public Works 
here, which shall be the basis upon which all extra work shall be valued/' 

* See Cn. f K, , 



29 



A note on the back of the above, signed S. Keefer, 19th March, 1860, Suggestion of 
states: — -' This is a good suggestion, and I recommend that it be at once acted x ' cr * 
on, by calling upon each of the architects, and the clerk of works to forward 
a list of the prices at which the extra work should be returned and paid for 
in the progress estimates." 

Another note on the back of the same letter, in the Secretary's hand J* 016 of Secre- 
writing, says, "act on this." 

Then follows a letter from the Secretary of the Department to all the Letter of Se- 
architects, of the 23rd March, saying : — -- I am directed by the Honorable the cretary. 
Commissioner to request that you will be pleased to trausmit at your cailiest 
convenience, a schedule of prices upon which the extra works at the new 
Parliament buildings should, in your opinion, be returned and paid for in the 
progress estimates/' 

The reply of Messrs. Fuller & Jones, Architects for the Parliamentary Reply of 
building, to this letter, is as follows, dated March 30th, 1800 :— «• In answer Messrs. Fuller 
to your communication of the 23rd instant, we have the honour to lay before 
you the three following prices fixed upon for extra work on the Parliament 
building, and at the same time beg leave to state that it is impossible to fix 
with any degere of accuracy a complete schedule of prices until the works are 
farther advanced. Excavation in rock not exceeding 5 feet in depth, $1.25. Prices suggest- 
Kxcavation in rock below 5 feet in depth, $1.90. Masonry in foundations ed by them * 
and backing, $8.00 per toisse/' 

A note on the back of this letter, signed S. Keefer, 17th April, 1800, Mr. Keefer ap- 

states : " After seeing the work, and discussing the prices with the architects P r ? ves of fcheM 

and clerks of works, I have agreed to these prices as fair and just for the 

extra work, and the estimates will in future be made at these prices." 

Another note on the back of the same letter, in the handwriting of the Note of ilou 

Hon. Mr. Kose, the Commissioner, and sitrned with his initials, contains the Mr * .^o^e ap- 

z u j " proving, 

word " approved. c 

The circumstance of the Hon. Mr. Kose marking with his initials the 
approval"' of these prices, before any extra work wes returned to the Department, 
seems fairly to establish that the Commissioner himself approved of prices 
which were other than those in the schedule attached to the contract, and so 
in fact sanctioning the dispensing with these prices according to the agreement 
with Mr. McGreevy as alleged by Mr. Keefer.")* 

The reply of Messrs. Stent k Laver, architects of the Departmental build- Messrs. Stent 

ings, to the same letter of the Department, of the 23rd March, and of date the f n,i J arei " as 
i^xi o a -i 10/-A j to extra prices. 

14th of April, I860, days : — l 

"Referring to your letter^of the 23rd ult., we beg to inform you that we 
have conferred with the Deputy Commmissioner, S. Keefer, Esq., respecting 
extra prices for additional works at the new Departmental buildings, during 
his visit to Ottawa, this week." 

■•He (Mr. Keefer) approves of our suggestion to submit the prices for all 
extra work to a conference of the several architects, and requests that such 
prices shall in all cases, before being certified by us, be laid before the 
Commissioner, for his approval. These instructions we understood to apply to 
all the Public buildings in Ottawa." 

K. t K, 



30 



Correspond Tliis whole correspondence points clearly to the agreement spoken of by 

agreementspo° Wr - Reefer, and is vouched for by him as proof of it on the part of the Chief 
ken of by Mr. Commissioner. 
Keefer. 

Justafter this correspondence, on recaipfc of the March estimate for 1860, 
the first in which extra work appeared, the Deputy Commissioner, ou examining 
it, wrote these words on the margin : " Schedules of prices not to govern extra 
work, to be allowed for at fair, current ratcs. ;; * 

Memorandum On this same estimate for March, Mr. ftubidge, assistant engineer and 

of Mr. Rubidgo architect to the Department, wrote the words : a No schedule prices given : the 
opprogress es- ra t es foeing determined by the local judgment and experience of the resident 
archieects and clerks of works, and are taken to be fair and just." t And 
thenceforward the extra work was paid for at rates exceeding the contract 
prices. Up to this time all work beyond the contract was classed as extra 
work. 

Contactors al- An extraordinary feature in the management, so far as rock excavation is 

lowed udvan- concerned, is the total disregard to economy with which the work was 
ces on stone C0D( ] uc t e d. So soon as the rock was taken from the excavation in the Parlia- 

tiiey iiadquar- , ^. . , .. ,. . . . - _. _, . 

vied as rubble mentary and eastern Departmental buildings, it was estimated by Mr. Morris 
stone delivered as rubble stone delivered by the contractor for the work, at the rate of 87 cents 
for buildings. for every §± cubic feGt? or ^ 3>48 per quarry to i se f 21G feet/f Two-thirds, as 

least, of the pickfaced masonry in the ducts and drains of these buildings it 
composed of the rock thus excavated, and a very large portion of the rubble 
masonry in the drains, ducts and foundations was constructed of rock from 
the excavations. § 

The contractors were allowed advances upon it, in the monthly estimates' 

as for quarry stone delivered by them, and were permitted to use it for rubble 

masonry and picked-faced stone-work as if it had been theirs, of right, without 

Without re- any remark or remonstrance whatever, being made by the Department. || The 

mark or re- estimates for all the buildings show that over 40,000 yards of rock were 

monstrance. excavated j this would, after allowing for waste, be equal to 8,000 toise, and 

would construct 0,000 toise of masonry of 54 feet, which was the measure 

a dopted, as the contract recognized 54 feet as thetoise.^f In Toronto a toise** 

of rubble masonry is 54 cubic feet; when this rule is adopted, the cubic 

contents of the wall in feet, including half openings, are measured and reduced 

Quarry toise. to the toise. In Ofctawaff and Kingston JJ the toise is 02 feet, but walls less 

than two feet thick, are measured as two feet, and openings under ten feet 

are not deducted. §§ In Montreal the toise is 72 French feet, usually estimated 

at 86 English feet, beiug really 86^ feet, and one half of all openings over ten 

feet wide, are deducted. The quarry toise of stone there is 216 French feet, or 

260j 2 6 English feet, cubic;|||| but in Upper Canada it is 216 English feet. The 

toise is a French measurefor quarry stone. It is a rough pile measuring 6 

feet long, 6 feet high, and 6 feet wide, — but the toise of masonry is 72 cubic 

Different feet, French. The fact of the difference between the French and English 

rdyino- it &P ^ oot no * being understood, or its being disregarded, accounts for the 72 

English feet being the measure in Ottawa, and 86 English feet in Montreal. 

If the Toronto toise be used it should be so as there understood, but the 

rubble masonry for the progress estimates was measured by the toise of 54 

feet, but walls less than two feet thick were measured as two fcct.^f^[ 



* K. f llu - t Mo - I Btc« !| See P. E. % See Cn., P. E. 

**G. fj-Stc. F. Bo. # Co. §§T. [HI T. Ste. Co. f If Hu. Bo. 



31 



An item of great moment in the boiler Louses, duets and drains, is pick- 
faced ashlar stone-work. There was no written order ever given for this extra 
work Mr. Fuller directed the work, and Mr. Morris carried it out as it is, in 
obedience to his directions.'" For this work Mr. Garth's order is vouched, Mr. Garth's or- 
but Mr. Garth never had any right to dictate the class of work; and when it der anddenial , 
was said he did it, he was adapting his plans to the buildings, many months 
before his contract was signed. f He distinctly denies having dictated this 
class of work, t Much of the blame has been hitherto charged upon Mr. Blam ® on bim 
Garth, in regard to the construction of the air ducts and flues, but he was never 
heard in explanation till now. It was convenient at the time, to throw the 
blame on some one, and on him it was thrown. His plans and specifications 
required the air ducts and boiler houses to be brick work. Mr. Morris and 
the architects directed ashlar work, and in these boiler houses, ducts and 
drains, there is allowed, for ashlar work in the progress estimates, the 
enormous sum of $56.320.50, — in Mr. Killaly's estimate, the sum ol 
$167,624.60, all unnecessary; part of the same work being rubble masonry, Rubble mason- 
pointed with cement, which is admitted to be quite sufficient. § In the construe- T /acts and boil° 
tion of the boiler houses, so little care was taken, that a large amount of heavy C r houses, 
ashlar was built under the stairs, and around the part where the boiler and 
smoke shaft are to be built, where the roughest rubble work would have been 
quite sufficient. || In the excavations of the main sewers for the Departmental Rock in main 
buildings, so little care was taken, that the rock in the bottom was taken out ?, ewer ta ?!5 j 00 
to a width of 15 feet, to contain a drain 2 feet 6 inches wide. Credit is, 
however, claimed for using this for air ducts above the drain : but so little skill 
was used in the Departmental buildings that three ducts were built over the 
one, and two over the three, instead of two over the one and three over the 
two as was the natural, as well as the artificial order in which the excavation 
should have been shaped for them.^] They should have been constructed in 
it thus, 

instead of as they are. 









on 0/ 

Y07 



All the space between these duels and drains and the excavation was built 
up with solid masonry, from the bottom to the height of the arches over the 
upper tier, instead of constructing the walls of a proper thickness, and ramming 
with earth And rubbish from the excavations, the spaces between them and 
the sides of the excavation.** The rock from these excavations lay near, and Rock from sx- 
was used as before stated, as belonging to the contractor, and whether actually °*™ tlonfl use 
built as rubble masonry, or thrown in as concrete, it was all measured as rabble 
masonry. 

The actual cost of pick faced ashlar including materials does not exceed 
30 cents per foot, face measure.f| In the progress estimates the contractors 
were allowed 41 cents per foot, face measurement.;);;}; In Mr. KillalyV 
estimate face, bed and joint measurement were allowed, being equal to about, 
$1.34 per foot. It is more than doubtful whether any advantage will be gained 



* Mo , F. 

** pi 



f Mo. J Ga. a Ga. II Ga. Mo. If St. PI. 

tt Ste. Hu. || See P. E. 



32 



Thoir utility by these ducts, more than if shafts had been used close to the buildings. But 
doubtful. whether long ducts or shafts were used there was no need for cither, beyond 

the buildings, till they had advanced towards completion, and their necessity 
and mode of construction had been well and maturely considered. In regard to 
the main sewer with ducts over it, from the eastern Departmental buildings, it 
was carried in a north easterly direction, a distance of 385 feet to the ravine. 
while the direct course only 177 feet, for which little better reason is given, 
than that Mr. Garth wishd the entrance to be in a northerly direction, and 
that some part of it would be available for other drains and ducts, which could 
be made to lead into it.* 

Expenditure Towards the close of the year I860, the expenditure had been so alarming, 

alairain^tho ^ iat m ^ e enc ^ of December, Mr. Page was sent to report upon the works, and 

end of year he remained till March, 1861, but had little opportunity of judging, excepting 

I860. through the representations of the architects."}" The walls had been covered up, 

and the snow was deep all the winter. His report, to which reference is here 

made, shows the data upon which he made it, and how the prices for extra 

works were agreed to by him, on the suggestion of the architects, and the 

showing of the contractors. It enabled the Department to commence the 

work in the spring under better arrangements and supervision. 

Mr. Bowes When Mr. Bowes assumed the duties of measurer for the Parliament 

comes in June, building about the second or third day of June, 1861, t he measured by the 
same mode, which had been used from the commencement of the buildings, 
which as regarded the rubble masonry, was that it should be measured by the 
toise of 54 feet, deducting the openings, but after the appointment of the Hon. 
Mr. Cauchon, and on the 14th August, 1861. he received the following letter 
from the Department of Public Works : — § 



Mr. Cauchon's il AVith reference to the measurement of work done, and materials deliv- 

directions in ere( i at t ] ie Parliament building* Ottawa, I am directed bv the Hon. the Oom- 

August, 1861, . . . . . ° - , .. , . •* . . r . , 

to Mr. Bowes, rmssioner to state that inasmuch as the parties tendering were not informed 
what system or usage of measurement would be followed in reference to these 
buildings, the contractors must naturally have presumed that they were to 
adopt a mode in usage in the locality where the buildings were to be erected. 
and without doubt have based their calculations on the modes referred to. 
I am therefore directed to instruct you to measure the work doneand to be done, 
and the materials delivered for the building you are now engaged on according 
to the usuages and customs in force in Ottawa. I am farther to request you 
to take special care with regard to the contract work, that the pro rata rates 
in the progress estimates are in fair proportion to the bulk sum named in the 
contract. I have also to instruct you to transmit in future the estimates direct 
to this office as soon as they arc prepared." 

Custom in CH- The custom in Ottawa was, not to deduct openings under ten feet, taking 

tawa applied. 72 feet as toise, and from this time until he had new instructions from Mr. 
Killaly, Mr. Bowes did not deduct openings, but still used the Toronto toise of 
54 feet, by which half openings are deducted. || Up to the month of August. 
the Nepean facing was measured to the chamfer of the jambs only. After 
that time the whole of the openings were measured as if they had been faced 
with Nepean stone. ^f Upon what principle this change was made, the Commis- 
sioners cannot understand. 

By the contract Ottawa limestone was to be used. By the arrangement 
already mentioned, about which as regarded the Parliament building there was 

*Hu f P., I Bo £Bo. || Bo. 1| Bo. 



33 



no dispute, Nepean stone was to be used instead of limestone, and the price of Explanation of 
substitution of the one for the other was to be 21 cents per foot * Those por- J! 1 ® subatitu- 

i « i ii i vt liiii r» i- tion of JSepean 

tions only, ot the walls where iMepean stone had taken the place or limestone for limestone, 
ought to have been measured and allowed for, at the rate agreed, and nothing 
more. The difference allowed between the two seems ample, and at all events 
had been fully agreed upon, as before stated expressly by Mr. McGreevy, and 
by Messrs. Jones. Haycock & Co., by acquiesence with the Order in Council. 

From the commencement of the works in the spring of 1861, until they Works carried 
were abruptly suspended in the end of September, they had been carried on, ^"better*" 11 " 
under better regulations and supervision than in the year 1860, and great pervision, 
progress had been made during that year, especially with the Departmental 
buildings. 

At the time of the resignation of the Hon Mr. Rose in June, 1861, there 
was on hand of the original appropriation $327,986.75, and to this sum was 
added two amounts of $100,000 each on the 23rd day of September and 19th - . 
day of November, by Orders in Council, of these dates respectively."!" The pro- till end "of Au- 
gress estimates had been regularly paid, and embraced all the work done from gust, 1861. 
month to month, and so continued till the month of August inclusive. J 
The whole works were going on, and there was money sufficient to carry them 
on at their ordinary progress, to the end of the building season. § 

The Hon. Mr. Rose had been succeeded by the Hon. Mr. Cauchon, who Hon. Mr. Cau- 
not being on terms with the Deputy Commissioner, did not consult him,|| or S!? on ^ UC p ee(i, 
any competent officer of the Department, and who, unfortunately for the pub- __ never con' 
lie interests, not satisfied with paying the monthly estimates, as had been the suits Deputj 
practice from the commencement, of his own authority, and without the Commissioner, 
ordinary or usual vouchers, paid Mr. McGreevy on the 11th September, peten t officer 

1861, the sum of $40,000 

On the 8th of October, 1861 40,000 

On the 19th October, " 10,000 

On the 20th November, « ,.. 45,000 

And to Jones, Haycock & Co.:— How f^ he 

On the 1st August, 1861, the sum of $10,000 exp 

On the 24th August, " 40,000 

On the 11th September, " 23,700 

On the 9th October, " 30,000 

On the 28th " " 10,000 

On the 20th November, " 45,000 

On the 13th May, 1862, " , 2,000 

Making a total sum of $295,700 

of which $135,000 was paid to the contractor for the Parliamentary building 
between the 11th September and the 20th day of November, 1861, and $158,- 
700 to the contractors for the Departmental buildings between the 1st August, 
1861, and the 20th November, a further sum of $2,000 being again advanced 
to them on the 13th May, 1862-Tf 

The amount paid to the contractors previous to the above advances by the 
Hon. Mr. Cauchon was $738,855.49,** making a grand total paid on all the 
buildings up to the stoppage of the work, on the 1st October, 1861, of 

*Mo. fK. . JK. IIK.C. 

5 



34 



Without appa- $1,034,555.49. On the 27th September, six days after having sent the Hon. H- 
rent cause. sua- jj Killaly with instructions, which will immediately appear, he ordered the 
S '»giyorks on the respective buildings to be suspended, because the appropriation 
had been exhausted. In fact so far as it appears, he had without necessity ex- 
hausted the appropriation, and immediately assigned this circumstance, as good 
cause for suspending the works.* 

On the 21st September, 1861, the following letter was addressed to the 
Hon. Mr. Killaly by the Secretary of the Department of Public Works : — 

Letter to the " I am directed by the Honorable the Commissioner, to request that you 

Hon. Mr. kil- w j]j ms ]^e it convenient to proceed to Ottawa with the least possible delay. 

" The sum appropriated by the Legislature towards the erection of the 
Parliamentary and Departmental Buildings, and of a residence for his Excel- 
lency the!Governor General, is now exhausted, and the honorable the Commis- 
sioner is most anxious that arrangements should be made with the view of 
closing the works for the winter as soon as possible, consistent with their being 
put into a state of security against frost, &c. The Commissioner, on his coming 
into his present office, found the plans of those buildings had been decided 
upon, the contracts entered into, and considerable progress made with the 
works, and in the preparation of materials of all kinds. In view of the magni- 
tude of these works, and the great outlay they involve, he at once devoted a 
large portion of his time to acquire such a knowledge of the details connected 
with the previous payments, the state of the works, &c, &c, as would enable 
him to form some idea how they stood with regard to completion, &s. ; but be- 
fore it was possible for him to acquire this information the appropriation was 
all but exhausted. The Commissioner very soon discovered that an extraor- 
dinary large proportion of the amount already paid has been for additional work 
extraneous of that shown and described in the plans and specifications and em- 
braced in the original contracts ; that of such additional work, no previous esti- 
mates or measurements had been made nor quantities ascertained. These quan- 
tities seemed to vary every day, and no prices or mode of measurement had 
been agreed on. Great discontent exists on the part of the contractors in con- 
sequence, who complain that a large sum to which they are entitled is held back 
from them, to their great injury and embarrassment in the carrying on of 
their work, and they represent that the returns of the architects did not, and 
do not, truly show the state of the work, the contract and additional work being 
so mixed up together that it is not possible from these returns to make out in 
the office the true state of the accounts — a fact as unfair and embarassing to 
the Commissioner as it is unjust to the contractors. In their opinion, this has 
been done with the view of hiding the great outlay on work not embraced in 
the plans and specifications, which should have been foreseen and provided 
for by the architects. 

ft Under the oircumstances, the Commissioner is of opinion that it is abso- 
lutely necessary to refer the matter generally to some qualified and impartial 
person, and as he understands you have practised as an architect as well as a 
civil engineer, and have not been connected with the works in question, he is 
very desirous that you should undertake the investigation of the whole case, 
keeping the following points in view : — 

" Firstly, — What arrangement can be at once made to suspend the work, 
in order to reduce to the utmost the amount to be expended on the responsi* 

*C 



35 



- gr r.. - ; ;*: 



bility of the Government, until the whole subject can be submitted to the Leg- 
islature. 

" Secondly, — To ascertain the amount that will be required to pay for 
work and material already done and provided, in order to enable the con- 
tractors to pay off and discharge their mechanics and labourers. 

11 Also, what expenditure will be strictly required to protect the works 
in their present unfinished state against the effects of the coming winter 

" Thirdly, — To make such investigation, and have such measurements 
made, as will enable you to distinguish clearly the additioDal work from that 
embraced in the contract. 

" To establish reasonable prices at which the former should be paid. 

"Fourthly, — To ascertain and report, for the information of the Commis- 
sioner, what portions of the work might, in your judgment, be allowed to 
lie over; and also, at what time it is probable the completion of the buildings, 
respectively (so far as to permit their occupancy), may safely be calculated 
upon, and whether it might be advisable to extend that period without inter- 
fering with the arrangements contemplated. 

" After duly and carefully examining into all these important details, 
you will be pleased to prepare and transmit a report thereon to the Commis- 
sioner, who will then be prepared, without loss of time, to have a final de- 
cision arrived at on the subject." 

On the same day that the above letter was written to the Hon. Mr. 
Killaly, the following was sent to Mr. Bowes, measurer for the Parliamentary 
buildings : — 

" I am directed by the Honorable the Commissioner, to inform you that 
the Hon. Mr. Killaly has been directed to make a thorough investigation 
into, and report upon, the state and progress of the works at Ottawa, past 
and present, and upon all details whatsoever connected therewith, with a 
view of determining the prices, and the mode of measurement to govern the 
settlement with the contractors." 

" Mr. Killaly may be expected in Ottawa in the early part of next 
week. In the meantime, you will exert yourselves, and endeavour to have all 
measurements of work and material closed up to the present month. You will 
also afford Mr. Killaly in the course of his investigation, every possible as- 
sistance, and information he may require, upon all matters connected there- 
with." 

These instructions to the Hon. Mr. Killaly, did not contemplate the set- These instruc- 

tlement of the contractors claims for the stoppage of the works, but immediate- tlon , s , , not 
i -ii i ' t* ii i ii -i contemplate 

ly alter he received them, he was informed that the contractors had received settlement 

orders to discontinue the work in toto. In his report of the 12th November, with contract- 

1861, he informs the Department of the course he intends to adopt, with ors ^ for 8top " 

reference to rates, upon which the contractors should be paid, for all work, 

not originally contemplated, or included in the contract, and that these rates 

should be applicable to all such work already performed, or remaining to be 

done to complete the whole. 



36 



Does not, ap- This so far as it appears, was passed in silence by the Department, leav- 

pcar to have j D ^ ^ m tQ [ Q f eY ^ that, what he proposed to do, was assented to, and became 
by Department part of his original instructions. It is to be regretted, that it did not oc- 
of Works. cur to him, that the settlement of what were fair prices for the work done, 
or to be done was the one thing, and the damages which the contractors 
claimed by reason of the stoppage of the works another, and that they had 
no necessary connection with each other. It was proper to show what fair 
prices were, as well as what was a fair compensation for an alleged injury, so 
long as it was understood that the damages had nothing to do with the actual 
prices of the work. The mere contract work could never have been done 
for the sum for which it was taken. What enabled the contractors to pro- 
ceed at all, was the extraordinary quantity of extra and additional work, and 
the extraordinary prices that had been allowed upon it, previous to his corn- 
Extra wo* ing.* To have stopped this extra work would have effectually stopped the con- 
was what en- tract work also, and it is difficult to see on what principle damages were ex- 
ors to "-o orTat pected for contract work, admitted to have been taken ruinously low, or for 
all. stopping extra work, which the Government had not bound itself to have 

done. In any eve it the quantity of work done and its value were totally un- 
connected with damages real or imaginary for the stoppage of the work, but 
Hon. Mr. Kil- ^] r Killaly appears to have based his mode of measurement and prices for 
hhf mode 1 of ^ ie P as ^ an d future woiks, and to have justified them on the ground that they 
measurements included or rather precluded all claim for damages for the stoppage of the 
and prices. work. i'he whole arrangement made by him was virtually a new contract for 
the extra and additional work, which had been done, and was to be clone at 
rates perfectly satisfactory to the contractors, but alike irreconcilable with 
fair prices, or the schedule prices attached to the contract,*)" the schedule of 
prices put in, in the first instance by Mr. McGreevy, and rejected as not re- 
presenting the contract, or the prices which the architect, Mr. Page, and the 
Department had considered fair and equitable while the works were in pro- 
gress..! 

His mode of jf t ne mode of measurement had been continued which had existed from 

measurement ,, , . , . r -. ,. ,. 

made comnari- tae commencement, aud increased juices iixed as remunerative, the comparison 

son difficult, between the rejected schedule of prices originally put in by Mr. Greevy, the 
schedule of prices attached to the contract, and those from time to time al- 
lowed as the works proceeded, would have been easy. To exhibit the com- 
parative ratio between those prices and these allowed by Mi. Killaly, has 
caused much delay in the progress of this commission, but without such a com- 
parative statement, the true position of the matter could never have been ar- 
rived at. 

Between the time the Hon. Mr. Killaly received his instructions, and the 
30th September, he had, as he says, after full consideration, decided upoi the 
principles of measurement for works of the Departmental buildings, which 
were also to govern those of the Parliamentary building, as stated in the fol- 
lowing letter of instructions sent by him to Mr.Bowes§ : — 

His letter to « A. s it is of the greatest importance that the full measurements of all the 

r. owes. wor k j Q the Parliament buildings executed up to the 1st of October next, be 

made and ready by the same time as those of the Departmental buildings, I 

have to request that you will at once proceed to make them. In so doing, you 

will be governed by the following principles in classifying the work : — 



* P. E. f St. % See P. E. § Bo. 



37 



" 1st. Contract Work. — That is to say, all work done, and materials de- 
livered for work strictly coming under the original contract, and wherein no 
deviations or additions have been made from or to the plans and specifications. 

" 2ud. Extras. — That is to say. such work and materials delivered for Extra. 
work coming under the head of contract work, but in which changes or addi- 
tions have been made either in the position, style, or class of materials from 
that shown or specified. 

" 3rd. Additional Work. — That is to say, all work, labor, and materials Additional, 
not included in the original plans and specifications. The principles of mea- 
surement agreed to and decided upon, after full consideration, for work of the 
Departmental buildings, are those which of course must govern the measure- 
ment of work of the Parliamentary building, and they are as follows : — 

" 1st. Masonry to be measured solid, including cut-stone, and no open- 
ings to be deducted. 

M 2nd. Nepean facing to be measured upon the whole of the external 
superficies of the walls of the building. 

" 3rd. Brick work to be measured 20 bricks to the cubic foot. All flues 
per foot lineal, and all splayed and arched work, per foot superficial in addition. 

u 4th. Cut-stone by English rule of measurement; that is to say :— 

" 1st. To be cubed to external dimensions before cutting. 

u 2nd. Plain face labor to cover, in addition to the face, one bed and joint. 

" 3rd. Sunk and moulded work to be measured, in addition to the p 
vious, by girth-ing, wherever it occurs. 

a As the works have been now stopped, I have requested Mr. Larose to 
unite with and aid you in making up the measurements. " 

On the 24th October, 1861, Mr. Bowes had the following letter from Mr. 
Killaly* :— 

The schedule is as follows : — 

" I enclose you a schedule, showing the rates agreed on for the additional 
works performed by the contractor for the Parliament buildings ; you will be 
guided by it in m iking up your return. The rates for material delivered you 
will regulate in due proportion to the prices of the work for which they are pro- 
vided, fixing those of material for contract work according to contract prices, 
and for additional work, by the rates in the schedule. 



* Bo. 



38 



The schedule is as follows : — 

NQ Hm^. Do6criplioil . b P SSS Ojta. Allow- 

1 — Cubic yd... Rock excavation in building to 5 ft. deep 1.25 2.25 2.00 

2 — " ... " extra depth for heating 

and Ventilation from 5 tolO feet deep... 1.90 3 60 3.00 

3— " ... " " « 10 to 15 2.25 5.00 4.25 

4— " ... " « " 15 to 20 6.00 6.00 

5 — " ... " in ducts and drains, forheat- 

ing and ventilating, to 5 feet deep 1.90 3.25 2.00 

6— " ... " 5 to lOfeetdeep 2.25 4.50 3.00 

7— " ... " 10 to 15 " 3.50 8.00 4.25 

8— <« ... * 15 to 20 * 5.10 9.00 6.00 

9 — " ...Earth excavat'n, extra depth to reach rock 0.40 0.75 0.55 

10 — " ...Filling to walls, levelling and ramming. . 0.35 0.8* 0.75 

11 — " ...Masonry in angle towers, additional 
foundations, thickening to walls in 



boiler-house, &c, &c, 4.00 7.50 6.50 

12 — Ft. Supl.,... Pick-faced work in ducts and drains. . . 0.41 ) n oc 0.41 

13— " ... * " in boiler-house 0.90 j U ' 80 0.41 

14 — " ...Picked face in arches to ducts) -, ? , -, »r -, - K -• r A 

15— » ... « " to drains. } 1-25 to 1.75 1.75 1.50 

16— Per mill.,... Brick-work in walls 13.50 16.10 13.80 

17 — Per ft. supl.,... Arches, segmental and circular.... 0.20 0.20 

18— Per ft., lineal... Flues 0.07 0.12* 0.25 

19— Per ft. supl.,...Nepean facing 0.21 0.55 0.50 

20—" " ...Flagging, 3-inch and under.. 0.07 to 0.38 0.45 0.25 

21—" " ... " 3-inch to 6-inch.... 0.07 to 0.38 0.45 0.30 

22 — ■' u ... " over 6-in., to be measured 

as block 

23 — " a ...Potsdam stone in relieving arches... 0.90 0.90 

24— Per ft., cubic... Ohio stone 0.75 1.40 1.25 

25— " " ...Nepean stone 1.40 1.25 

26— Ft. sup.. ..Plain face on Ohio stone 0.28 0.45 0.40 

27— " ...Sunk " « 0.42 0.75 0.60 

28— « ...Circular « « 0.56 0.90 0.64 

29— « ...Moulded and sunk works, Ohio stone 0.40 0.65 0.60 

30— « ... « and circular « « 0.62 1.00 0.90 
31 — Miters ...Allow a foot for each, price accord- 
ing to classification. 

32— Ft. cube...Brockville stone 0.52 0.80 0.80 

33 — Ft. sup., ...Labor on do. 50 per cent more than 



W~m ^Ohio. 

34 — Ft. cube... Blue sandstone for steps and landings 1.40 1.25 
35 — Yd. sup.,... Concrete in bottom of drains Jand 

ducts one foot thick , 2.00 2.00 

36— Yd. sup,,. ..Do. for floors 3.00 3.00 

37_p er ton ...Boiled iron joists 160.00 140.00 

38_ tc ...Bivetted plate girders 240.00 220.00 

39— Ft. cube. ..Marble 2.50 2,00 

40— Ft. sup.,... Labor on do. plain faced 3.00 2.50 

41— « ... " « circular 3.75 3.50 

42— " ...Centreing, measuring all arch 0.20 0.35 0.20 

43 — Per lb., ...Ornamental iron work in castings 

and terminals 0.50 

44 — Ft. sup.,... Doors (additional) on basement floor. 0.70 

45 — " ... " above basement 0.7 

5 



3d 



No. ,- Description, 

lion. c 

46 — Each ...Additional windows in basement of 

angle towers, sashes and frames 
complete, not glazed 

47 — Additional windows in other parts of basement, 

large, with double shades 

48 — Each ...Additional windows on ground and 

first floors, none. 

49 — Each ...Altered windows on ground and first 

floors, none. 

50 — Ft. sup. . . Architraves 6 x 2, with 2£ roll base- 
ment 

51 — P. square... 2-in. white pine flooring laid, includ- 
ing strips in concrete 

52— P. square... H-in. do, do, do 

53 — Per lb., ...Plumber lead work 

54 — P. square... Slating, including copper nails and 

battens 

55 — Per lb., ...Iron bolts and straps fixed 

56 — M.B M. ...Labor and timber in roof concealed 

(framed) 

57 — P. yd. sup... Plastering, best class, hard finish... 

58 — ...Oak wrought and fixed (not settled) 

59— ...Pine " " " 

60 — P. ft. sup... Cement moulded skirtings, includ- 
ing mitres 

61 — " ...Plain plaster cornice ..... 

62 — Per lb., ...Ornamental cast iron 

63 — Yd. sup.,... Painting 4 coats in oil 

64 — " ...External iron work in picked colors 

65 — " ...Asphaltum staining, 2 coats 

66 — " ...Oak graining 

67 — In. sup., ...Gilding 

68 — Yd. sup , ...Cement floors, l£-in., 

69 — " ...Extra labor on sandstone quoins... 

70 — Alterations in saloons to be settled by ' 

deducting work not done at 
schedule prices, allowing the 
extra rate for work substituted. 

71 — Claim for cut-stone in piers in base 

ment. The architects admit 
this as far as under. the houses 
below contract level, — quanti- 
ties to be ascertained and en- 
tered as sim ilar work 

72 — Claim for 7 iron built girders to carry 

walls, and required when the 
additional fire-proofing was 
adapted ascertain weight and 

rate as similar work 

73 — Claim for extra labor on Brockville stone in 

windows of basement, plinth, 
&c. The stone was procured 
by the contractors, consider- 
ing it cheaper; finding the 
difficulty of working it, they 
abandoned it. No allowance. 



Progress Claim- Allow- 
Estimates. ed. ed. 



12.50 
20.00 



0.20 

7.50 
5.75 
0.25 

11.50 
0.15 

30.00 
.40 



0.56 
0.30 
0.08 
0.30 
0.40 
0.18 
0.35 
0.04 

0.75 



To be settled by 
Measurer. 



To be settled by 
Measurer. 



£bb per ton 



40 



74 — Claim for difference between oak and pine sills ^ 

to all sashes throughout the | 
building; settled by assuming I To be settled by 
oak and workmanship at 85 | Measurer, 

cents a supl. foot, and deduct | 
value of pine sills. J 

(Signed,) H. H. KILLALY. 

The difference between the prices allowed in this list, and those used for 
the progress estimates, will not appear by mere inspection, but by considering 
also the increased quantity of work which Mr. Killaly's mode of measure- 
ment gave, and to which his prices were applied. 

For example, pick-faced work in ducts and drains, bad been allowed 
lor by the architects at 41 cents per foot, measured on the face only, but Mr. 
Killaly added a bed and a join', so that 51,000 feet face, became 164,000 
feet, for all of which the price of 41 cents was given. 

The masonry in the ducts and drains, roughly measured as solid work, 
became 8,744 yards, instead of 4,643 yards, the actual quantity. 

Mr. Killaly's y[ Y Killaly, as he states in his report, considering in his judgment the 

Department Department liable to the contractors for the amount of such losses as they 
being liable to could establish, the extent of which he doubts not would be considerable, 
contractors. Du t into which he did not separately enquire, caused him to fix on equitable 
rates, which should be applicable to work already performed, and to be per- 
formed, so as to induce the contractor to waive all claims whatever caused by 
the suspension of the work. In determining these rates, he appears to have 
received the statements of the respective contractors, and then to have con- 
sulted Mr. Stent,* one of the architects of the Departmental buildings, in 
Mr.^Stent ex- reference to them, who in explaining the apparent inconsistency of his con- 
plains his ap- duct in reference to the prices staled by himself and his partner to have been 
parent inoon- f a | r an( j equitable, while the works were in progress, and the prices allowed 
gard to former by him in the estimate of Mr. Killaly, and in explaining the part he took in 
and Mr. Kil- the settlement made by Mr. Killaly, says f : " We considered Mr. Killaly a 
laly's prices, special commissioner with special powers. We understood from him that he 
had come to settle disputed points between the contractors and ourselves, 
and that he was also entrusted to deal with the question of compensation to 
the contractors for a breach of their contract on the part of the Government, 
and that he was authorized to enter into the question of compensation to 
them. The contractors submitted to him their complaints'and grievances in 
respect of the work • he requested us to meet him at his office, and we did ; 
he proposed to get Mr. Pattison, accompanied by some person on the part 
of the contracters, to measure the work on a mode of measurement which had 
been adapted conjointly, and upon which we were consulted. 

We understood the measurement was made in accordance with this 
mode, but we had nothing to do with it or with the measurements, from June, 
1861. We went overthe claim of prices for the work, as made by the contrac- 
tors; many of these prices we objected to, and they were reduced, and some 
rejected altogether. Those reduced, were so, to the amount mentioned in his 
report, If we had been consulted as to the settlement, we should have said, 
measure and value of the whole work, was the fair mode, at the prices we had 



* St. t St. 



41 



been chiefly accustomed to use, and which we settled with Mr. Page, We 
considered measurement and value as the fair mode, because the contract had 
been lost in the amount of extra and additional work. Mr. Killaly thought 
it would be better to give compensation to the contractors, in the increased 
price for their work and materials. He decided it on his mode of settlement. 
Messrs. Jones, Haycock <fc Co., put in the prices they claimed, what was al- 
lowed was put by the side of their claim, as an equitable compromise. He got 
all the information he could from us, and from the contractors, as to the 
value of labor and material. He made the estimate and value of the work 
done, and to be done on his own judgment, and when his estimate was made, he 
requested us to sign it, and the measurer also/' 

The heading states that that estimate is based upon the rates of prices, and 
the principles of measurement for past and future work, arrived at, and ap- 
proved by Mr. Killaly. We signed that estimate, certifying it to be a correct 
statements the amount of material in the building, and that the gross amount 
carried out, from the data given, is correct We do not assume the responsi- 
bility of its being correct in detail, nor can we assume the responsibility of say- 
ing what is due the contractors for damages, for breach of contract on the part 
of the Government. We assume that the measurements are correct on the 
principles Mr. Killaly laid down, but we do not assent to some of the items 
of his prices. We do not certify to the measurement, for we never measured the 
work while in progress, or afterwards. We only took the measurement as cor-' 
rect, by Pattison, on Mr. Killaly's principles. — 1 consider the measuring of beds 
and joints as the only true mode of measuring masonry : that is the universal 
practice in England, and in my own practice, but I object to measuring openings 
in face work. The local custom is not to measure beds and joints. In our let- 
ter to the Department, we stated that we thought this the fair way, but we 
knew it was contrary to the rules of the Department, the local custom in this 
place, and the custom in the Province. I considered the prices fixed by Mr. 
Killaly in excess of prices allowed *nder ordinary circumstances. The ques- 
tion of the prices allowed, by Mr. Killaly, as the mode of compromise for dam- 
ages, was what I considered out of the ordinary course." * 

In his evidence, given before the Commission, Mr. Fuller, one of the 
architects for the Parliamentary building, states : — 

" When Mr. Killaly came, we considered he had the supreme authority Mr. Fuller's 

to fix and determine everything."! evidence in ex- 

planation of 

his conduct in 

" SVq only signed his estimate as a matter of form, without any res- signing that 
pousibility whatever. As we understood it, the progress estimates of work estimate - 
done and materials delivered for the Parliament building, to the 1st October, 
1861, was based upon the rates of prices and principles of measurement, for 
past and future works, arrived at and approved by the Hon. II. II. Killaly and 
Thomas McGreevy, as the heading of it shows. 

''I gave my opinion once, on being asked, but I and my partner took no 
responsibility in it. It bears at the end of it our certificate as to its correct- 
ness, but we only certified it as based upon the principles and terms stated in 
its heading, and not as to the correctnessof the prices. I understood these 
prices were settled as a compromise which he had full power to make. 

" I do not recollect any direct request, from Mr. Killaly, that I should 
sign this estimate, but I recollect saying to him : I can have no objection to 



See the evidence of Mr. Stent, in further explanation. + r 

6 



42 



sign it wheu, by its heading, you assume the principles and rates upon which 
it is based, and .1 say now that it was upon his desire, in sonic way expressed, 
though I cannot now remember the distinct terms of it. T did sign it. 

"My estimate of the amount required to finish the buildings, stated in 
Mr. Killaly's report, is based upon his prices and mode of measurement, not 
upon any estimate of my own. 

" I cannot say how much it is in excess of the contract prices, or of 
the prices we settled with JMr. Page, and I have never made any estimate as to 
what it will take to finish the buildings. I should not like to venture even 
a guess estimate, a positive estimate would take months to make. Those of 
Mr. Killaly are but approximate estimates." 

Mistakes of Mr Referring to these principles of measurement, it is submitted that Mr. 

Killaly sug- Killaly was mistaken in directing masonry to be measured solid in the ducts 
gested in re- d ^ 
gard to open- 
ings. 

The face beds and joints of the pick faced stone in them were measured, 

and then the whole was measured as a solid mass of rubble masonry, when in 
fact they were composed of bottom sides and top.* To treat the openings in 
these as the openings in the face of a wall seems unreasonable. He was mi s- 
of Nepcan taken too in directing the Nepeau facing to be measured upon the whole 
f*cing. of the external superficies of the walls of the building, "j- for as it has been 

shown, Ncpean stone w T as a substitution for blue limestone where this would 
otherwise have been used. This circumstance being overlooked, may have 
led to the mistake. 

Mistake in He was mistaken also in allowing 20 bricks to the cubic foot, for there 

bricks. are only 20 bricks in the superficial foot of a 1^ brick wall, and lastly he was 

mistaken in applying the English mode of measurement when it was not used 
In bed and r relied on, and in directing one bed and one joint in addition to the face to 
J0 be measured on cut stone. 

In this Province and in the United States, the face only of worked stone 

is measured, and although it is true that where beds and joints are measured, 

as in England, the price per loot is less, yet that fixed by Mr. Killaly was 

greatly in excess of what had been considered, and was in fact fair and 

Errors in al- equitable. Besides the differences which appear between the value of the work 

M Wa K*n l° f ^°" e in fc ^ e est * mates °f ^ r - Killaly, on his own principles of measurement and 
rates of prices, and those adopted by the Commission, there are errors and al- 
lowances, w r hich it is submitted ought not to have been made. In items Njs 
Items Nos. 62 62 of the Eastern Departmental building, and 63 of the Western Depart- 
of Eastern De- men t.d building, he erroneously carried out the extra brick-work in all the ex- 
buildino-s, and ternal walls in which there were contract and extra work together, in such a 
63 of Western, manner that all such walls w T ere rated extra thus, in item (52, of the eastern 
wrong. Departmental buiidiug, brick laid in thickened walls, and in additions per M. : 

Howwrongin 1,941^81 bricks at 813.80 $ 26,791.05 

mental Si- Contract, 957,300 bricks at $6.30 6,031.36 

ing. 

$ 20,759.69 



* Bo, t Bo. 



43 



Now it should have been bricks in thickened walls and ad- 
ditions, 1,941,381, bricks of which there are 957,360 of 
contract work, giving 984,021 extra brick, at $13.80 $ 13,579.48 

Error in favour of contractor $ 7,180.21 Error. 

for the eastern block, and in the same way in item 63 of 

the western block there arc returned brick in thickened 

walls and additions : 

1,674,110 bricks, at $13.80 per M $ 23,102.71 

Contract, 753,060, at $6.30 4,744.27 How in West 

$ 18,358.44 
It should have been brick in thickened walls and additions, 
1,674,110 bricks, of which there arc 753,060 bricks of 

contract work, giving92i,050 extra brick at $13.80 $ 12,710.49 

Error in favour of contractor 5,647.95 * Error. 

The errors amount to 12,828.16 

and consist as is evident in not deducting the quantities from each other to 
ascertain the number of extra bricks before extending the prices. 

Another error of $8,500 in the three buildings, is in the item of scaffold- Scaffolding er- 
ing, numbers 91 and 86 of the Departmental buildings. fowed^ 17 ** 

It is said the contractors intended to have had the scaffolding inside, and 
to have built the external walls overhand j but it appears such work cannot 
be properly done in this way, and that scaffolding of the kind used was re- 
quired in carryiug out the contract, and should not have been allowed. Mr. 
Stent says it should not have been allowed as extra,"!" but he signed Mr. Kil- 
laly's estimate allowing it.t There is no allowance for scaffolding in the Par- 
liamentary building, for the specification was explicit on this point. 

In reference to the architects for the Departmental buildings, two items Error in speci- 
for extra work, Nos 33 and 34 of Mr. Killaly's estimate for both the De- fication of De- 
partmental buildings, deserves special notice, as they involve an amount of P art ^ental g 

$15,030.74. reference to 

quoins. 

" These are Ohio stone quoins extra from limestone/' and the Commis- 
sioners concur in the view that they are extra taken by Mr. Killaly. The 
specifications were stated, as has been mentioned by the architects, to have 
been so well considered that it was not anticipated any extras would arise. §§ 

In the specification for the Departmental buildings it is said, tl all the 
stones used in the buildings, except otherwise described, are to be the blue 
limestone of the district carefully selected," and again '• quoins in all cases 
to bed in the walls at least 9 inches, to be in no case less than 15 inches long 
and 9 inches wide, to rise in irregular heights, and have random back joints j" 
and again, " the whole of the sandstone dressings, including pinths, window 
and door joints, heads and mullions, tracery, stringcourses, eaves course, finials, 
buttress caps, and slopes, parapets, chimney shafts, caps and mouldings, and 
otherwise on the external fronts." Quoins, however, are not mentioned ; and . 
when they were not, blue limestone was to be used. || It had thus become a arose whether 
question with the contractors whether they were bound on a fair construction the contractors 
of these clauses, to make the quoirs of Ohio stone, but havine; so made them, ^©rebound to 

,,,.,., , «r ' nnt Ohio stone 

they claimed it as an extra. ^ j a q UO i ug 



S» ft, t St, i 6t f I y, and St. reports: with original dosign*, j| gp, f St, 



44 



The architects had contended that the specification bound them to put in 
Ohio stone, and until Mr. Killaly flame they had resisted it as an extra, and 
signed his estimate allowing for it $15,030.74 in the two Departmental build- 
ings. 

The allowance or disallowance of this sum made a difference to them for 
their per centage of 8750. 

Allowance ©f [n the Parliament building the quoins are not better than those specified, 

\?'*m"*? t0 - ' llutlve " sandstone upon which there should have been no extra; but notwith- 

for quoins standing this a claim was made by Mr. McGreevy for extra labour on them, 

without any which Mr. Killaly acknowledges by allowing him for it the sum of .$1,780.40.* 
reason. 

There having been in fact no measurements of the buildings, except what 
Mr. Killaly had caused to be made, on principles which the Commissioners 
could not adopt, it was deemed expedient to have them thoroughly measured, 
as well as all the plant and materials on the ground. 

New measure- For this purpose they appointed in the first instance, Mr. Gundry, an 

ment ordered, ai . c hitect from Toronto ; Mr. Leveque, an architect from Montreal ; and sub- 
sequently, to expedite the work, Mr. Harper, a builder from Toronto. 

With Mr. Gundry, they associated Mr. Bowes and Mr. Larosc ; with 
Mr. Leveque, Mr. Hutchison and Mr. Pattison ; and with Mr. Harper, Mr. 
Pelham. Mr. Bowes had been measurer for the Department of Public Works, 
of the Parliament building, and had measured it from the time he came for 
the progress estimates, and for Mr. Killaly on the principles laid down by 
him.f Mr. Larose had been clerk of works on the same building. J Mr. 
Pattison had been measurer of the Departmental buildings, and had measured 
them from the time he came for the progress estimates || and for Mr. 
Killaly on the principles § he laid down, and Messrs. Hutchison & Pelham, 
had been clerks of works on the Departmental buildings. *|f This mode of 
association was adopted, that no part of the work should be omitted, that 
one should check the other, and that data for a comparison should 
be afforded, of the present with the approximate measurements, and 
Notice to con- with that of Mr. Killaly. Before proceeding however, Mr. McGreevy was 
tractors. informed by letter on the 15th day of July, 1862, that Mr. Thomas Gundry, 

who had been engaged by the Commission to measure the work done upon 
the Parliament building, would begin that day at three o'clock, and the 
Commissioners considered it proper to advise him of the fact, in order that 
should he be so inclined, he could be with him during the measurement. The 
Reply of .Mr re pty °f ^ r - McGreevy to this notice is dated the 17th July, and was as 
McGreevy. follows : — " I beg to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 15th instant, and 
in reply would say, that the works constructed by me, and the materials de- 
livered, have been already measured by the architects and measurers appointed 
by the Board of Works for that purpose, as certified in their estimates to the 
1st October, 1861, bearing date of 12th March, 1862, of the correctness of 
which I am satisfied. I therefore do not consider it necessary to take any part 
in the new measurement now contemplated, as however, it is possible that the 
directions to the gentlemen appointed to this duty, may differ from the system 
pursued by the architects and officers of the Board of Works, who previously 
measured my works, and by whose decision I am bound, under the terms of 
my contract. I will feel much obliged, by your furnishing me with a copy of 
the instructions given to Mr. Gundry, in order that I may, if I think neces.-ary, 



» St, f Bo, i I*. Pt, | Pt. <f VU 1J«, 



45 



call the attention of the Commission to any portion of them. I take this the 
earliest opportunity that has been afforded to me, to beg that as the enquiry 
which is now taking place has been instituted by the Government without 
reference to me, that you will be pleased to furnish me with a copy of your 
instructions as far as they relate to my works/' 

The reply of Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., to a like notice on the same Reply of 
day, apprizing them of the appointment of Mr. Leveque, is precisely to the Haycock &Co. 
same effect, aud neither took any part in the measurements, for if the measure- 
ments of the lion. Mr. Killaly, and the prices fixed by him, were to bind the 
Government, it was clear that the contractors would neither take part in the 
present measurement, nor submit any claim for damages for the suspension of 
the works. 

The gentlemen to whom the measurements were committed, had written 
instructions on the 15th July, 1862, as follows : — " Excavation to be measured 
per cubic yard, masonry to be measured solid, and all deductions for openings 
of doors, windows, &c., to be recorded. Nepean facing to be measured on the 
face of the work, by a thickness of nine and ten inches. The openings of win- 
dows, doors, &c, the Ohio stone dressings, and the Potsdam stone arches to 
be separately recorded as deductions. 1 he local stone for which the Nepean 
stone is substituted must be deducted. Brick work to be measured, 20 brick 
to the standard foot, of three bricks in thickness. All openings and fire places 
to be deducted to Jthe spring of the arches, and recorded. Cut stone to be 
measured first for the cubical contents of the stone ; second, for the superficial 
labour on the visible face of the stone under the respective headings of rough 
bush hammered work, picked work, erandlcd work, fine bush hammered work, Bash hammer- 
plain work, rubbed work, sunk work, moulded work, chamfered work, carved wor " 
work, and the same heading of circular work ; this applies to the Ohio and 
Brockville stone. Potsdam arches to be measured per foot superficial on the Potsdam stone, 
face of the wall, at an average thickness to be ascertained. Carpenters, Joiners, 
Smith, Iron founders, Slaters, and Plumbcrs'work, to be measured and classified 
according to the several headings, set forth in the schedules attached to the 
contracts of the respective buildings. The measurement to be entered in the Measurement 
measurement books under the respective headings therein contained, viz : — - m the mea- 
Total measurement of work as it now stands. Contract work, which istosurement 
include all classes of work included in the bulk sum of the contract. Extra Dooks - 
work to make good deficiencies in the plans and specifications. Additional 
work, to embrace all works on foundations below contract lines, and work 
additional to contract plans. Works connected with heating and ventilation 
to be kept distinct from other works." 



Farther written instructions to the measurers were given on the 19th Farther in- 

ember, as follows : t™™Zl 

measurers. 



li First, To measure the various kinds of work in the buildings, as they are Work as it n< 
at present, entering the dimensions in the books and returning the quantities. " 



is. 



u Second, To measure the Buildings and ascertain the quantities of the vari- Contract work, 
ous kinds of work done in accordance with the contract. 

il Third, To ascertain the various quantities of work that have been done Extras, 
extra to the contract, and return them under the different headings according 
to previous instructions, and the omissions from the contract. 

"The dimensions of the above to be entered in the large books, as Oj»i3sio»i!» 
previously instructed. 



46 



" Fourth, To measure the various kinds of work required to complete th 
Tstvl PI< buildings in the present style and character of work, and return the quantities* 



Work to com- 
plete 
sen 



Work to com- ''Fifth, To measure the various kinds of work required to complete the 

plete accord- buildings according to contract, and return the quantities, 
ing to contract. ° 

Materials. u Sixth, To measure and ascertain the quantities of all materials of their 

different kinds, whether in the rough, or prepared, or partly prepared for the 
works in the buildings, and return them accordingly. 

Plant and ap- " Seventh, To measure and value the whole of the plant and appliances 

pliances. on the grounds necessary for the carrying on of the work, including sheds, 

fencing, &c, and return the same accordingly, with prices and quantities of 

each item.'*' 



Verbal instruc- 
tions subse- 
quently given. 



Time required 
for measure- 
ment exceeded 
expectations. 



There were verbal instructions subsequently given not to measure Nepean 
facing by the cubic foot, but on the superficies of the wall, where it had been 
substituted for limestone. In the Parliament building it was said to be bedded 
ten inches in the walls; in the Departmental building nine inches The 
change in the mode of measuring this work arose from the circumstance that 
in the correspondence and estimates about the Nepean facing, it is sometimes 
spoken of by the cubic foot, but on referring to Mr. McGreevy's acceptance 
of the price of 21 cents for the substitution, he mentions it by the superficial 
foot, and it has been so measured. The time required for the measurements 
and calculations of quantities has exceeded what the Commission contemplated, 
but it is believed that no time has been spent unnecessarily, and that the utmost 
diligence in performing the work intrusted to them has been shown by all 
employed; indeed Mr. Fuller in his evidence says that to make a positive 
estimate for the completion of the Parliamentary building would take months. 



Schedules A 
and o. 



Their measurements and calculations minutely detailed as they are, will be 
available, it is hoped, for future use, in case any difficulties should again arise 
respecting the measurement and value of the work. 

The estimates prepared upon the measurements under this Commission 
have been made in nearly the same order as those of the Hon. Mr. Killaly, 
that they maybe the more easily compared. 

The schedule of work done on the Parliamentary building is marked A ; 
the schedule a attached to it is the day bills of work done, amounting to $347,- 
404.44. 



Schedules B 
and b. 



Schedules C 
and r. 



Schedule G. 



Schedule H. 



The schedule of work done upon the eastern Departmental building is 
marked 13, and the schedule b attached to it is the dav bills of work done, 
amounting to $227,342.91. 

The schedule of work done on the western Departmental building is 
marked C, and the schedule c attached to it, is the day bills of work done, 
amounting to 8188,156.71. 

The schedule Gr is the statements and measurements of the work prepared 
for the Parliamentary building, amounting to $27,630.20. 

The schedule H is the statement and measurement of the material on 
the ground, and in the brickyard for the Parliamentary building amounting to 
•06,880.05. 



47 



The schedule I is the list aud valuation of the plant, sheds, and workmen's Schedule L 
houses for the Parliamentary buildings ; and the schedule i attached to it is 
the plant in the brickyard, amounting to $10,052.12. 

The schedule K is the statement and measurement of the work prepared, Schedule K. 
and material on the ground for the eastern Departmental building and of the 
brick in the brickyard for both buildings, amounting to $44,9-32.22. 

The schedule L is the statement and measurement of the work prepared, Schedule L. 
aud material on the ground for the western Departmental buildine:, amounting 
to $17,525.87. 

The schedule M is the list and valuation of plant for both Departmental 
buildings, and the plant in the brickyard, amounting to SI 6,990.54. 

Schedule N is the amount of the expenditure on the buildings till the 29th Schedule K. 
December last, amounting to $1,106,083.73. 

Schedule O is the valuation of the external work 

The schedules A, B, C, show in the first column, the contract work What Sehe- 
rated at the prices mentioned in the pchedules of prices, attached to the dules A - B * c 
contracts, the aggregate of which, added to the quantities of work yet to 
be done, at the same rates, shows how far these were applicable to the 
bulk sums of the respective contracts. In the second column the work and 
its value, which has been omitted from the contract work at the same rates. 
In the third, the extra work which, in the language of the Commission, is 
to u embrace all the work done to make good deficiencies in the plans/' — 
In the fourth the additional work, which in the same language, is to embrace 
work on foundation lines below contract lines, work connected with heating, 
ventilation, and sewerage not covered by the contract. In the fifth, heating 
and ventilation which, in this view is additional work. lu the sixth, 
the total quantity of all the works of every class, rated at what are 
conceived to be fair prices according to the mode of measurement adopted by 
the Commission. In the seventh, the, superfluous work, the plans and 
specifications of the contracts being the standards. I : this column is all the 
picked-faced masonry in the boiler-houses, ducts and drains, for if rubble 
masonry smoothly pointed was suflicie r t, as is now admitted, this pickfaced 
work was all superfluous, and has all been measured in addition as rubble 
masonry. The distinction between extra and additional works, as used in Extra and ad- 
connection with these buildings, and introduced into the Commission had had ditional work 
the effect of giving a colouring to some of the mismanagement connected as usc ' 
with them, by making that appear additional which was in fact extra. The 
work embraced on the foundation lines below contract lines was caused by de- 
ficiency in the plans, which did not show the true but imaginary grout d 
line and was, therefore, extra work, on the very definition of it given in the 
Commission. 

It will be observed that in these schedules the prices set upon the extra and Prices set upon 
additional work, are not those of the schedules attached to the contract, but ®? t . rfl * nd a< V 
the prices settled upon, and allowed as the works were in progress, by the not those at- 
architects, sanctioned by Mr. Page and the Department of Public Works. It tached to con- 
will be borne in mind that the agreement with Mr. McGreevy, while he was tract - 
ole tenderer, that the schedule of prices to be attached to the contracts, 
hould not be applied to extra and additional works, was made before the 
ontracts were executed, and that whatever might have been the previous 
greement, the contracts themselves settled what the final agreement was. 



*o 



iS 



Written and f) n no principle known to the Commissioners, could there exist together 

•ontompora- a wr jttcn and contemporaneous parole agreement about the same thins:, nor 
neous parole , *T „ ,, r .. a „ ,. ... , , c> . 

agreement. any agreement made beiore the sealing ot the contracts, which could restrict 

or modify them. But the difficulty arises from the fact that the architects 
fixed, and the Department of Public Works afterwards sanctioned other 
prices than those contained in the schedules to the contracts. That the works, 
while in progress, were paid for at these prices, and that the Department of 
Contractors Public Works dealt with the contractors respecting this work at those sub- 
dealt with by ge q Ueil t prices. At this late hour to apply the schedule of prices attached 
the subTe^uent to the contract, to extra and additional work, under these circumstances, w r ould 
prices. be manifestly unjust, for the work has been so paid for j to get it back is 

supposed to be out of the question. The Commissioners have therefore adapted 
the prices which have been so settled upon, as far as they can be applied, 
and fair prices where they had not before been settled On the same princi- 
ple, no charge, for rubble stone from the excavations has been made against 
the contractors, for as the work was going on, they were allowed to use it as 
True state of their own. In order to show the true state of the account for the whole work, 
accounts at ^he total of all the quantities of the work of all kinds has been carried out, and 
rates. *" rated at prices applicable to the mode of measurement which the Commissioners 

consider fair, as deduced from* the evidence, and applied, under the experience 
of the gentlemen who, in this branch of knowledge, are on the Commission, 
on the principle of measure and value. 

Stylo of the The style of the buildings accords well w r ith the noble and commanding 

buildings. position on which they have been placed. The Parliamentary building 
especially, presents a very grand, yet very pleasing facutle The De- 
partmental buildings are more severe, and broken in their outlines, but 
contrast, not unfavorably, with the other more regular and chaste building 

Works, on the The works as executed are, upon the whole, good, excepting the brick 

t th°° wor ^ i Q both, especially in the Parliamentary building, which is, to a con- 
brick-work,— siderable extent, bad in itself, and worse than in the other buildings, both as 
bad in all, regards material and workmanship. * — The objectionable part was done 
worse in Par- cn iefly under sub-con tracts, and the bad material was allowed to be used by 
i n g. L Mr. Larose, for reasons stated by him, *f but he, in this respect, failed to do 

his duty. The large quantity of bricks rejected by Mr Morris, J it is believed, 
were for the most part subsequently used in this building, § although some of 
them were removed from the grounds. 

How the errors The errors made, aud the superfluous work permitted to be done, 

were made,and arose in all the buildings from the want of due consideration of what was 
the superfluous rea ]] v required, and of proper supervision and control, but a large proportion 
of this is found in the Parliamentary buildings. 

Contractors The contractors cannot, in justice, be censured for doing as much extra 

only to blame ail( j additional work, as the imperfect plans or new requirements of the build- 
or par * ings rendered necessary, for by the performance of these alone, at prices 

other than those mentioned in the schedule, could they have saved themselves 
from ruin. For the unnecessary and useless work, they are to blame, for the 
want of supervision did not justify them in doing what was clearly erro- 
neous, unnecessary and superfluous. It is, nevertheless, creditable to them that 
under the circumstances, with the exception of the brick work, the purely con- 
tract work has been so well and fairly executed. 



* McE. t L. % Mo. I L. 



.49 



The work yet to be done on the Parliament building is shown to be What yet to be 
$636,682.01, as by the estimate marked D. The work yet to be done on the one ' 
eastern Departmental Buildings is shown to be $164,929.83, as by the estimate 
marked E. The work yet to be done on the Western Departmental building 
is shown to be $140,768.96, as by the estimate marked F. These estimates 
have been made at the same scale of prices and mode of measurement as those 
for the work already done. 

The measurements and prices allowed to the contractor in the progress 
estimates for the Parliamentary Building on his contract work, and extra and 
additional work taken together, were, in the opinion of the Commissioners, 
remunerative, for the amount is in excess of the value of the work estimated 
at fair prices, according to the mode of measurement adopted by the 
Commission. He had, besides the rubble stone which came from the excava- 
tions, an item of no inconsiderable value, which, on a close accounting, 
ought to be charged against him. His schedule prices were 31 per cent. 
in excess ot what would have represented the bulk sum of his contract. 

The measurements and prices allowed the contractors in the progress 
estimates for the Departmental Gildings on their contract work, and extra 
and additional work taken together, were, in the opinion of the Commission- 
ers, not remunerative, for the amount is not in excess of the value of the 
work estimated at fair prices, according to the mode of measurement adopted 
by the Commission. 

These contractors, too, had the rubble stone, but it was of less value to 
them than it was to the other contractor, for in the Western Departmental 
building little, comparatively, was used, although in the eastern one it was. 

The following summary exhibits the results of this branch of the 
enquiry in all essential particulars : — 



PARLIAMENTARY BUILDINGS. 



Hon Mr. Killaly's estimate of work done and materials on 

hand, including day bill $ 686,120.52 

Amount received by contractor 483,163.95 



Parliamentary 
buildings. 



Amount yet due $ 202,956.57 

Estimate of Commission ©fall work done and materials on hand, 

including day bill $ 441,463.75 

Amount received by contractor 483,163.95 

Amount overpaid contractor 41,700.20 

By giving contractor credit for plant, &c, in case he does not 

finish the building 10,052.12 



The balance overpaid will be $ 31,648.08 



DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS. 

Hon. Mr. Killaly's estimate of work done and materials on hand, 

day bill including $ 785,609.85 

Amount received by contractors 511,391.54 

Amount yet due $ 274,218.31 

7 



Departmental 
buildings. 



50 



Estimate of Commission of all work done and materials on hand, 

including day bill $ 477,955.71 

Amount received by contractor 511,391 54 

Amount over paid contractor 33,435.83 

By giving contractors credit for plant, &c, in case they do not 

finish the buildings 16,990.54 

The balance overpaid will be $ 16,443.29 



Estimate for ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 

completion. 

Hon. Mr. Killaly's estimate for completion : — 

Parliamentary Buildings $ 454,825.76 

Departmental Buildings 372,394.25 

External work 267,290.00 



$1,094,510.00 



Estimate of Commission exclusive of materials on hand : — 

Parliamentary Buildings 636,253.95 

Departmental Buildings 306,696.79 

External Work ; 128,675.00 

Works connected with Mr. Garth's Contract.. 36,727 95 



$1,107,353.69 
Add for Superintendence and Contingencies, 15 per cent 16,6103.04 

Total $1,278,456.73 



It has been the aim of the Commissioners that this report should be in 
the narrative form, rather than that of dealing with all the subjects of 
enquiry in the order in which they occur in the Commission, — but there are 
matters mentioned therein, which cannot well be disposed of in this way, and 
will therefore be specially referred to. 

Whether plans First then, as to whether the plans adopted were of the style of architecture 

adopted were Des t adapted to the climate of this country, and are of a class and character of 

called for. 8 y * workmanship called for by the advertisement inviting competing designs. As 

the designs have been adopted, they have not made this a subject of special 

enquiry. The opinion expressed upon their agreement or otherwise with the 

advertisement, are conflicting. The style of architecture is also the subject of 

differing opinions, and it is very doubtful whether it is the best adapted for 

the climate of this country, or for the purposes of the buildings. The 

climate requires a style admitting of a projecting cornice, and gutters to protect 

the walls j this style does not properly admit of either, and the gutters which 

were intended for the Departmental buildings, have been dispensed with, walls 

The will be much exposed to the water from the roofs, and to the weather. 

Probable want There will also be found a great deficiency of light in many of the apart- 

°arts Sht m j ments i a the Departmental buildings, and in the basements of the Parliament 

{buildings. 



51 



Secondly: "As to whether the works were examined, and how often, by an How often 

officer of the Department of Public Works and the name of that officer, and wo ^ k3we w e f" 
ill i n i i i • >> amincd \j an 

whether he approved of the works in progress or otherwise. officer of De- 

partment. 

It appears that the Hon. Mr. Rose visited* these works on the 20th day of 
September, 1859, the 5th July, 1860, and in September, on the laying of the 
foundation stone. Mr. Keefer, the Deputy Commissioner, visitedf them on 
the 6th October and 20th December, 1859. On the 11th April, 21st June, 
1st September, and 6th November, 1860, and the 23rd May, 1861. Mr. 
Rubidge.J on the 23rd May, 1861 j Mr. Page,§ on the 18th December, 
1860, and remained till the beginning of March, 1861. Mr. Cauchon|| visited 
the works on the 22nd July, and on the 30th October, 1861. The architects 
say that the Hon. Mr. Rose was taken over all the works and shown the exca- 
vations for sewers, and Mr. Stent says his attention was especially drawn to 
the extra price paid for rock excavation in the western Departmental building 
over that in the eastern one.^f Mr. Fuller say Mr. Keefer never disapprove! 
of anything that was going on.** Mr. Morris says the works were exa- 
mined by the Deputy Commissioner at his visits, f*)* and that he saw and 
sanctioned the work in the air ducts and boiler houses JJ Mr. Keefer himself 
says that on his visit, in April i860, he saw the works, and also when he 
was in Ottawa, in June, inspecting the Prescott and Ottawa Railway, when 
the eastern Departmental building was all up to the basement floor, and about 
half the basement walls laid in the Parliament buildings, and the model of 
the library nearly finished. In his visit of September, at the ceremony of 
laying the foundation stone, he made no inspection. In November he went 
over the works with the Hon. Mr. Sherwood and the architects, examined 
estimates with them, and heard complaints of contractors regarding delay in 
getting plans, but that he has no recollection of the state of the drains 
and ducts in Apiil, 1860, or when the excavations were commenced, and 
has no knowledge of the authority for doing them outside the building; 
that in June he must have noticed the works but does not remember what 
impression they made on his mind. In November the excavations were 
far advanced and attracted his notice, when he though*, there was going to 
be an immense amount of unauthorized extra work.§§ 

Mr. Rubidge says that on the 20th May, 1861, he received instructions 
from the department and went to Ottawa in the end of the same month, and 
remained till the end of June ; that he made preparations under the directions 
of Mr. Keefer, who was with him, for an independent measurement of all the 
extra work which had been done on the buildings, but upon the Hon. Mr. 
Cauchon's coming into office, the Order in Council under which he acted was 
rescinded. mi 

Thirdly : " As to the amount of damages (if any) the contractors may have Damages for 
sustained, or shall sustain from the works having been suspended. The Com- sto PP a g e of 
missioners gave notice by addressing letters to Messrs. McGreevy and Messrs. claimed. 
Jones, Haycock & Co., on the 3rd day of September, 1862, informing them 
respectively that they were prepared to receive any claims for damages which 
either might have against the Government by reason of the stoppage of the 
work, and that they would receive any evidence they might wish to give in 
support of their claims. " In answer to this, Mr. McGreevy addressed a 
leiter, dated 9th September, to the Secretary, saying: — 



*Mo., F. St. fMo., F. St. K. J F. St. 

I F. St. 98, jj St. f St. ** F. St, ft M °v 

XX Mo., \l K. HI Ru., 



52 



Mr. McGree- « I have to acknowledge the receipt ot your letter of the 3rd inst, in which 
vy'e reason for y QU state ^at y 0U are directed by the Commissioners to say that they are 
submit any. prepared to receive any claim for damages which I may have against the Gov- 
ernment by reason of the stoppage of the works. 

" In reply, I have to remark that I consider that I am in no wise bound by 
any report which it may be the pleasure of the Commissioners to make,, 
regarding the works constructed by me at Ottawa. 

" I presume that the Commission has issued under the provisions of law r 
if so, the investigation must be of limited character, and cannot, under any 
construction of the statute, be made to comprehend the proposed inquiry, the 
same being beyond the jurisdiction of the Commissioners. I therefore respect- 
fully decline to submit for the consideration of the Commissioners, the adjust- 
ment of any claims which I may have against the Government of this Pro- 
vince, arising out of my relationswith it, in respect of the buildings at Ottawa." 

In answer to the same notice, Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., addressed 
a letter to the Secretary, saying: — 

Messrs. Jones a We have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of 3rd inst., in- 
Haycock & forming us that the Commissioners are prepared to receive any claims for 
for not sub- damages which we may have against the Government by reason of the stop- 
mitting their page of the works, and that they would receive any evidence we might have 
claim. to g* er j n s U pp 0r t of our claim. In reply, we beg to say that in the settlement 

made between us and the Hon. Mr. Killaly, acting on behalf of the Govern- 
ment, it was agreed that all claims of the character to which you allude, should 
be included, which was done. 

u We have never been informed that the Government do not consider 
themselves, and are bound by the settlement then made, and until we are so 
informed, we think we are precluded from advancing claims which are em- 
braced in it. Acting under this impression, we beg you will inform the Com- 
missioners that the only claim we now make is for payment of the balance 
stated by Mr. Killaly and the architects to be due to us with interest, and 
such further sum as we can show and are entitled to be paid for materials 
delivered since his report was made, and which are not included in it, together 
with necessary expenses for taking care of the works since the 1st day of May 
last, at which time it was supposed the works would have been resumed." 

No enquiry upon this point has been made. 

Whether judi- Fourthly, as to " whether it is judicious and for the public interest that the 
cious or not to WO rk should be proceeded with under the present contracts and system, or that 
under present ^ ne present contractors should be settled with, and that the unfurnished por- 
contracts. tions of the work relet." 

Reasons why The works having been suspended when the contractors were willing to carry 
they cannot, them on, it cannot now be expected that they will finish the respective build- 
ings and works under the existing contracts. From their replies to tlie invita- 
tions to attend the measurements, and from the reasons given by them, for 
declining to submit their claims for damages for the suspension of the works, 
it is evident that they stand upon the settlements made with them respectively 
Commissioners by the Hon. Mr Killaly on the part ot the Government. The Commissioners 
do not suppose asgume there are sufficient grounds for the Government to disclaim those 
by it. settlements, both as regards the work done, and still to do, and they consider 

that to carry on the works, there must now be new contracts or some othe 



53 



mode adopted to finish the building. They therefore respectfully recommend Recommend § 
that the whole work yet to be done, so far as is absolutely necessary for their wor to g0 on 
occupation, be vigorously carried on, that such work shall be offered to the 
present respective contractors at the prices mentioned in the estimates of work 
to be done hereto annexed, marked D. E. F., which, if accepted by them, shall 
be the basis of new contracts on their parts with the Government, but on con- 
dition that any brick work originally bad, shall be replaced by them, at their 
own expense. That if this offer be declined, the work to be done be offered 
for public tender at prices above, below, or agreeing with the prices in this 
estimate, or that the work be carried on with the present staff of measurers 
and clerks of works, under an officer appointed by the Government, to super- 
intend the whole operations. The Commissioners believe that the prices 
mentioned in this estimate will be remunerative. It is respectively suggested Suggest there 

that there should be no difference of salaries erven to those officers as at should be no 
, ° difference in 

present, salaries of 

clerks of works 
Fifthly, as to whether from " the evidence and the documents that 
might be submitted, it would be judicious for the public interests longer to 
continue the architects in their present position or otherwise" has caused the 
Commission much anxiety. That the architects of both buildings have not Architects 
done what might have been expected of them, is very apparent. Both in- Qav . e not done 
duced the Government to suppose their plans could be carried out for the ap- Educing Gov- 
propriation, but works of the kind are never done, it is said in explanation, for eminent to 
the estimated sum.* Much of the mismanagement, and many of the errors su PP ose ^ork 
are directly or indirectly attributable to them. Both ordered extensive extra for a pp r0 p r i a . 
and additional work, to be proceeded with without the written authority of the tion. 
Department, f and permitted unnecessary and superfluous work to be done. J 
Both allowed Mr. Morris to assume powers he did not possess, neither remon- in allowing 
strated, until on the interesting occasion of laying the foundation stone in Mr - Moms to 
September, 1860, it became personally important who should be first, and then ^"™ 
they felt their position had not been assigned to them, that all the eclat of 
the arrangement and management had been given to Mr. Morris, and they 
complained, not of what had annoyed them, but of what they had before omit- 
ted and forborne to complain. § He was put then on a proper footing. Both in leading 
signed the progress estimates, leaving it to be inferred the measurements had Government to 
been made, under their superintendence, contrary to the fact. Both signed n^Jj^red the 
the estimates of the Hon. Mr. Killaly, to give them currency, by implication, work for pro- 
and their explanations of their conduct in reference to these, to use the mildest gress estimates 
expression possible, scarcely removes the impression that they overlooked for 
the moment the true distinction between right and wrong. There is ground Groundfordis- 
for discrimination between them, especially in the part they took in the matter criminating 
of settling the prices, and signing these estimates, but they ought to have e ween em " 
acted on the ground, that their office in its professional character was subordi- 
nate to no one that they were bound without bias or even suspicion of bias to 
maintain their own judgment of what was right in regard both to principles of 
measurement, and prices of work intrusted to them, and that in sanctioning 
either by an act in itself eqivocal, for a purpose avowedly other than the deter- Tne y P lace . 
mining a correct mode of measurement, and fair prices for work, they were a e f a ise V6 pos? 
placing themselves in a false position. tion. 

The high tone of professional duty and ettiquette which Mr. Fuller Mr - Fuller, 
assumed as due to his position in the first instance, would have been detracted 
from in no way, by his using or at least superintending the use of the tape line in 
testing the laying out of the foundation walls, or by figuring the plans for 



K. fP X Mo., F.St. §F. 



64 



Adapting his 
supervision to 
existing cir- 
cumstances. 



Mr. Stent more 
facile. 



Quoins and 
•caflolding. 



Explanation of 
his conduct. 



Commission- 
ers' views. 

Their reasons. 



Hardship of 
dismissing 

arcuitocts. 



No allowance 
for superfluous 
or unnecessary 
work. 



those less skilful than himself in the execution of a work from which he expected 
renown rather than reflection ; nor would it have lowered him in the least de- 
gree to have adapted his supervision to a state of things he found existing 
rather than that which ought to have existed. But he took no part in deter- 
mining the prices fixed upon by Mr. Killaly ; he signed the estimate however 
under the impression that its heading relieved him from responsibility.* 

Mr. Stent was more facile, he was a party to settling these prices and 
agreed to most of them, during their discussion ; t to all of them, in so far as 
signing the estimates was agreeing to them. J What were fair prices he had 
the means of knowing as the work was in progress, and in representing them as 
fair then, he was acting honestly or otherwise ; if honestly, there was nothing 
in the mere circumstance of stopping the work, which made them unfair, or in 
any other circumstance which made them so, or which should have induced 
him to agree to other prices so very different. In the matter of the quoin 
and scaffolding, § items of large amount, they were extra or not, not because 
the works were suspended. 

He explains his conduct by alleging that the contract was swallowed up 
in extra and additional work, and done away with, because as he says it was 
broken by being stopped ; but the very estimates distinguish Nearly between 
the contract and extra and additional work. || In view of all these considera- 
tions, the Commissioners nevertheless believe that great inconvenience would 
be likely to arise in finishing the buildings under other architects. They 
think that the errois which have been committed may be lessons of experi- 
ence for their future conduct, not easily forgotten, and that they will be better 
able now to perform their duties creditably to themselves and satis factori'y 
to the Government. The hardship too, is felt of depriving them ol the credit 
of carrying out the buildings to completion. It is, therefore, respectfully re- 
commended that they be continued, but that their duties and allowances be 
distinctly defined before anything further is done. It is respectfully sug- 
gested that in allowing five per cent on the whole expenditure, the expense 
of the present measurement of the works shall be deducted, for proper mea>ure- 
ment was intended to be made by them, under the original arrangement, but 
that no allowance be made to them for the superfluous and unnecessary work. 
In the ease of the Parliamentary buildings in England, it is understood thit 
three per cent was allowed for plans and supervision, and one per cent for 
measurement. 



Sixthly. — "As to whether provision was made for heating and ventilation, 
drainage, water and gas supply, and of such works embraced in the estimates, 
and to what extent provision was made for works of this class. " The questions 
of heating and ventilation has been already disposed of. 

There was provision made for drainage by means of glazed earthen pipes 

in the spefications. In the Parliamentary building, 100 yards pipe, 12 inches; 

200 yards, 9 inches ; 300 yards, 6 inches j and 300 yards, 4 inches in diameter, 

were to be provided. In the specifications for the Departmental buildings 100U 

feet of pipe, 12 inches, and the same number of feet 6 inches in diameter, were 

to be provided j beyond these, there was no provision originally made ior any 

of drainage. When the boiler houses were allowed to be made ten feet deeper 

boiler houses than was originally intended, it caused the sewers exterior to be buildings to 

to be'deepened ^ e ma< ^ e ten ^ eet deeper in the rock than they otherwise woul-1 have been re- 

also. quired. For this there was neither provision nor estimate, but it was included 

in the extra and additional work for heating, ventilation and sewerage. 



Provision in 
specification 
for drainage. 



Deepening 



* F. 



t St. 



t St. 



I su 



II St. 



56 

■ ■ I I ■ ' ■ - '== — : ~ ' ===== 

The specifications provided for chases in the walls for pipes, but none have Chases. 

been made in them. There is no good reason given for the omission. The Remarks of 

Deputy Commissioner supposed they had been made. The architects say they D ?P ut y Com - 
•.f* 7 . . II* pi -i-ioti missioner and 

had no instructions, and no plan given 01 them, and therefore did not cause architects. 

them to be made. This omission will cause extra expense, spoken of by 

some as very large, by others as very small. Some injury will be done to 

the walls in introducing water and gas into the buildings. It is a small item 

in the mismanagement arising from want of due consideration of what was 

really to be done, before the buildings were commenced. 

Seventhly. — "As to all expenditure that has been incurred directly or All expendi- 
indirectly connected with the buildings." lYth buUd^f 

The estimates prepared under the Commission, show the amount incurred Estimates pre- 

for work done, and materials provided for the work. The amount actually K™ ?"!?; ® r 
. •, r* • i n i t t •vi, ■, , J Commission, 

paid tor services, and an account oi work, directly or indirectly incurred about 

the buildings, from the beginning up to the 29th day of December last, was 

$1,106,083.73, which is detailed in schedule N, hereto annexed, to which Schedule - 

special reference is respectfully directed. 

The Plan A, is a plan of the grounds showing a proposed arrangement Plan A * 
for finishing the quadrangle in front of the buildings. 

Plan B shows the foundations of the Parliament building as they are Plan B. 
completed. 

Plan C, a small block plan of the Parliament building. Plan C. 

Plan D, a plan of the foundations of the Parliament building as finished, plaa D. 
with the contract plan shown upon it in a darker colour. 

Plan E, a small tracing of the Parliament building. Plan B. 

Plan F, is foundations of main tower. Plan F. 

Plan G, sections of ducts and d:ains in Parliament building, with section Plan G. 
of masonry in main drain and ducts. 

Plan H shows elevation of grounds by Mr. Slater. Plan H. 

Plan I, a small tracing of the Parliamentary building. Plan L 

Plan K is a plan showing edge lines of excavation, Parliament buildings. Plan K. 

Plan L, main sewer, west Departmental building. p Jan L . 

Plan M, main sewer, west Departmental building, with elevation showing pl M M 
drain and ducts. 

Plan N, basement floor Parliament building, showing work as executed Plan N. 
and contract work. 

Plan O, ground floor of do do Plan 0. 

Plan P, first floor of do do Plan P. 



56 



Plan Q. Plan Q, foundations west Departmental building, showing the work as 

executed and the contract work. 



Plan R. 


Plan S. 


Plan T. 


Plan U. 


Plan V. 


Plan W. 


Plan X. 


Plan Y. 


Plan Z. 


Plan A a. 



Plan R, basement floor of 


do 


do 


Plan S, ground floor of 


do 


do 


Plan T, first floor of 


do 


do 



Plan U, foundations east Departmental building, showing the work as exe- 
cuted, and the contract work. 



Plan V, basement floor of 


do 


do 


Plan W, ground floor of 


do 


do 


Plan X, first floor of 


do 


do 



Ian Y, plan of grounds and buildings ; showing position and direction of 
main drains, over which are some of the ducts. 

Plan Z, showing the air ducts leading to the buildings. 

Plan Aa, Plan with cross sections of grounds, showing a mode of finish- 
ing them. 

The following are detailed drawings for finishing : 

No. 1 is plan and sectious, extension east wing of eastern block, 
Departmental buildings. 

No. 2, Steps to east door-way do do 

No. 3j. Cornice for main tower do do 

No. 4, Stair cases in building, both blocks. 

No. 5, Details of do do 

No. 6, Finishing of archways to do 

No. 7, Chimney caps do do 

No. 8, Large window for main tower, east block. 

No. 9, Steps to entrance to main tower, both blocks. 

No. 10, do to south doorway do 

No. 11, Plan of ventaduct, eastern block. 

No. 12, Plan of ducts and sewer do 

No. 13, Basement plan, showing alteration in boiler house, eastern block. 



57 



No. 14, Boiler house roof. 

It is believed that all the material enquiries contained in the Commission 
have been reported upon in one way or the other, although not in the order 
in which they are there mentioned ; but lest any errors have occurred, or any 
conclusions have been drawn which are not warranted, or any thing omitted 
which ought to have been reported, the Commissioners respectfully beg leave 
to report, the Commission itself, all the proceedings hud under if, all the 
written testimony of the respective witnesses subscribed by them, all the con- 
tracts, plans, schedules, specifications, estimates, letters and , documents of 
every description had before them. 

Jno. Wilson, Chairmau. 
Joseph Sejeard, 
V. Bourgeau, 

Commissioners. 

"D. Stark, 

Secretary. 

Dated at Ottawa, the 

29th day of January, 1863. 



SCHEDULES 



REFERRED TO IN 



REPORT OF COMMISSION. 



60 



PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, OTTAWA. 
SCHEDULE A. — Summary of Measurement of Work done. 



-m^» 





Valuation at Schedule and 
Progress Estimate Rates, j 




1 

$ cts. 

119,875 87 
8,193 64 




Extra work at Progress Estimate rates 


111,682 23 

6,022 57 
103,610 31 

1 
114,183 56 


Additional work at Progress Estimate rates 


Work for heating and ventilation at Progress Esti- 




Total carried to general summary 


$335,498 67 



Commissioners' Valuation. 



$328,961 08 



THOMAS GUNDRY, 
JOHN BOWES. 



SI 



SCHEDULE A. 
MEASUREMENT OF WORK DONE TO THE r u ;U ,MENT BOTLMN08, OTTAWA. 



. . 






._J!ZZ- 



OlUn. 1Mb Jiiivj, 1881 



Bum •• 



JOI1N BOWKS. 



SCHEDI 



Contract work at Schedu 
Omissions from contract 



Extra work at Progress 
Additional work at Pro^ 
Work for heating and 
mate rates 

Total ci 



63 



SCHEDULE ^.—PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, OTTAWA. 

Account of Work done and Material supplied by Mr. Thomas McGreevy, 
Contractor, from the commencement of the Works up to the 1st December, 
1861, as returned in the Progress Estimates. 



March, 1860 




$ cts. 

6 65 
28 00 
15 00 


cts. 




28 " labourers, at 100 








49 65 




3 50 

65 00 

900 00 

32 30 

288 00 

212 00 

237 50 

52 50 

30 00 

90 00 

450 00 

190 95 




26 days foreman stone-cutter, at $2 50 






450 " stone-cutters, at 2 00 












288 " labourers, at 1 00 


1 




112 " single teams, at 190 






95 " double teams, at 2 50 






30 " blacksmiths, at 1 75 






30 " blacksmiths' helpers, at 1 00 


















12 days foreman stone-cutters, at $2 50 


2551 75 


May, " 


30 00 
268 00 

57 00 
301 00 
144 40 
114 00 
354 00 

90 00 
132 00 




134 " stone-cutters, at 2 00 












301 " labourors, at 100 


i 




76 " single teams, at 190 






38 " double teams, at 3 00 






236 u carpenters, at 1 50 






Balance on model house , 






2 sample walls, materials and labour 






7 days foreman stone-cutters, at $2 50 


1490 00 




17 50 

96 00 

24 70 
307- 00 

26 00 
306 00 

14 00 
7 20 

60 00 
129 20 

51 00 
351 16 
250 00 




48 " stone-cutters, at 2 00 






33 " foreman labourers, at 1 90 


I 




307 " labourers, at 100 


1 




13 " foreman carpenters, at 2 00 


i 




204 " carpenters, at 150 






8 " blacksmiths, at 175 






8 " blacksmiths' helpers, at 90 






30 " masons, at 2 00 






68 " single teams, at 190 






17 " double teams, at 3 00 






Sundry materials used in models, samples,' fences, repairs. &c , 
Paid on account of modelling 






28 davs stone-cutters, at $2 00...., 

152 " labourers, at 1 00 , 


1639 76 


July, " 


56 00 
152 00 

26 00 
304 50 

10 50 

6 00 

130 00 

19 00 

39 00 
399 15 




13 " foreman carpenter?, at 2 00 






203 " carpenters, at 150 






6 " blacksmiths, at 1 75 






6 " blacksmiths' helpers, at 100 






65 " masons, at 2 00 




. | 


10 " single teams, at 190 






13 " double teams, at 3 00 






Sundry materials used in model house, &c 






7 days foreman stone-cutters, at $2 50 


1142 15 


August, ft ........ 


17 50 
204 00 

28 50 
284 00 

20 00 
279 00 

15 75 

9 00 

386 00 




102 " stone-cutters, at 2 00 






15 " foreman labourers, at 1 90 ,.. 






284 " labourers, at 100 












186 " carpenters, at 1 50 , 






9 " blacksmiths, at 1 75 






9 " blacksmiths' helpers, at 100 






193 " masons, at 2 00 








1243 75 






1 


8117 OS 



64 



Account of Work done and Materials supplied by Mr. Thomas McGreevy, 

Contractor, &c. — Continued. 



August, I860. 



Brought forward. 



$ Ct3. 



October and No- 
vember, 1860... 



December and 
January, 1861.. 



11 days foreman masons, at $2 50., 

15 " painter, at 1 75.. 

15 " panes glass, at 50.. 

4 lbs. putty, at 15.. 

28 lbs. mixed paint, at 18.. 

23000 ft. boards and scantling, at 14 00.. 
95 lbs. nails, at 6.. 

Mortar in alterations 

Iron for model 

1375 lbs. soft soap for flues, at $ 06. 

260 lbs. alum, at 20. 



62 days foreman carpenters, at 2 00.. 

416 " carpenters, at 1 50.. 

24 " stone-cutters, at 2 00.. 

9 " foreman masons, at 2 50.. 

92 " masons, at 2 00., 

27 " foreman labourers, at 1 50.. 

486 " labourers, at 1 00. 

97 " single teams, at 1 90.. 

ll£ " double teams, at 3 00., 

Paid cash on account of modelling , 

84 lbs. mixed paint, at $ 15. 

60200 ft. lumber, at 14 00. 

1250 lbs. nails, at 06. 

Mortar in alterations , 

Cash paid Lang for painting 

8 windows painted and glazed, $ 3 00., 
5 gals, paint-oil, at 1 25 

2 gals, turpentine, at 1 00., 

4 bxs. glass, at 7 00. 



April, 



1 pair '.* T" hinges, at 40c. 
39 yds. factory cotton, at 
10 pbgs. tacks, at 
15 days bricklayers, at 
32 " painter, at 

6 sashes, at 
28 panes glass, at 

1 pkg. tacks 

2£ tons straw, at 

82 days labourers, at 
25£ " carpenters, at 

3 " foreman carpenters, at 

8 u labourers, at 

2 " double teams, at 
13825 ft. lumber, at 

170 lbs. nails, at 
6 prs. hinges, at 

1 latch 

2 gross screws, at 

Difference in canvass 

Cach to Zollikoffer 



1 lock, 50cts. 
15.. 

2 
1 



10. 
00. 
75. 



no. 
20 



I 7 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 

14 





00. 
00. 
50. 
00. 
00. 
00. 
00. 
06. 
20. 



$ 1 50. 



500 ft. lumber 

30 lbs. nails 

195| days labourer, at 
55£ " masons, at 
23 " stone-cutters, at 
18 " carpenters, at 

1 " double team , 

1 " single team , 

100 ft. fuse 

15 lbs. powder, at 

600 ft. lumber 



1 00. 

2 00. 
2 00. 
1 50. 



40. 



Carried over. 



27 
26 

7 
00 

5 
322 

5 

19 

120 

82 

52 



50 
25 
50 
60 
04 
00 
70 
00 
00 
50 
00 



124 

624 

48 

22 

184 

40 

486 

184 

34 

120 

12 

842 

75 

30 

16 

24 

6 

2 

28 



5 

1 

30 

56 



00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
50 
00 
30 
50 
00 
60 
80 
00 
00 
15 
00 
25 
00 
00 
90 
85 
00 
00 
00 



18 


00 


5 


60 





25 


15 


75 


82 


00 


38 


25 


6 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


193 


55 


10 


20 


1 


20 


1 


30 


3 


01) 


13 


65 


120 


(0 



6 
1 

195 

111 

46 

27 

3 

1 



6 

6 



00 
80 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
90 
75 
00 
00 



$ cts. 
8117 06 



668 09 



2998 30 



622 71 



404 46 

12710 65 



65 



Account of Work done and Materials supplied by Mr. Thomas McGreevy, 

Contractor, &c. — Continued. 







$ cts. 


$ cts. 
12710 65 






1 00 
27 00 
66 50 






54 ft. ashlar, at 
66£ ft. fL.gs, at 

5 days foreman carpenters, at 
43 " carpenters, at 

85 " labourers, at 

6 " stone-cutters, at 

7 " masons, at 
8000 ft. B. M. lumber, at 


$ 50 






1 00 






2 00 


94 50 


Mkv 1861 


10 00 
64 50 
85 00 
12 00 
14 00 
80 00 
20 00 




1 50 






1 00 






2 00 






2 00 






10 00 












20£ days masons, at 
33 " bricklayers, at 
53 " labourers, at 


$ 2 00 


285 50 




41 00 
66 00 
53 00 
70 00 


2 00 






1 00 












1£ days stone-cutter, at 
26" " bricklayers, at 

9 " masons, at 
20 J " carpenters, at 
63 " labourers, at 


$ 2 00 


230 00 


July, " ., 


3 00 
52 00 
18 00 
30 75 
63 00 
34 00 
12 75 

3 45 


2 00 






2 00 






1 50 






1 00 
























29 days masons, at 
8 " bricklayers, at 
1 u carpenter, at 
13 " stone-cutters, at 
75 " labourers, at 


$ 2 25 


216 95 




72 00 
18 00 
2 00 
29 25 
82 50 
77 49 


2 25 






2 00 






2 25 






1 10 












5 days bricklayers, at 
2 " stone-cutters, at 
4 " carpenters, at 
8 " labourers, at 


$ 2 25 


281 24 




11 25 

4 50 

8 00 

• 8 80 

11 25 

13 58 

1 62 


2 25 


i 




2 00 

1 10 












1132 ft. boards, at 
27 lbs. nai's, at 


$12 00 @ 1000 ft 






06 


! 






1 $59 00 

1113877 84 




1 

! 



In protecting the building from damage — prices fixed by Mr. Killaly : 



October and No- 
vember, 1861... 



December, 1860, . 



185400 ft. 1-inch boards and scantling, at $10 00 @ 1000 ft. 
1750 lbs. nails, at $ 06. 

120 days foreman carpenter, at 3 
618£ " carpenters, at 
41 " foreman labourers, at 
24| " double teams, at 
234 " labourers, at 



00. 
00. 
40. 
00. 
00. 



ROOFING BOILER HOUSE, &c, &c. 

18460 ft. 1-inch boards and scantling, at $10 00 ^ 1000 ft. 
97 lbs. nails, at $ 06 



Carried over. 



$ cts. 

1854 00 

105 00 

360 00 

1237 00 

57 40 

74 25 

257 40 



184 60 
5 82 



3945 05 



190 42 



18013 31 



66 



Account of Work done and Materials supplied by Mr. Thomas McGreevy, 

Contractor, &c. — Continued. 



December, 1860... 



Brought forward. 



1 prs. hinges, at 

4 days foreman carpenters, at 
59i " carpenters, at 

19 w labourers, at 

5 " double teams, at 



% 20. 



00. 
00. 
00. 



3 00 



$ cts.' 



00 40 
12 00 
119 00 
20 90 
15 00 



$ cts. 



18013 31 



167 30 



$18180 61 



The following was allowed by the Clerk of Works, but on revision disallowed by 
the architects, and again allowed by Mr. Killaly : 



September and 
March, 1860 



77£ days carpenter, at 

4 " foreman carpenters, at 
\\ " foreman labourer, at 

99 " labourers, at 

8 " double teams, at 

5 " stone-cutters, at 
5 " bricklayers, at 



00. 
00. 
40. 
10. 



3 00. 
2 00. 
2 00. 



Total |$18502 61 

JOHN BOWES. 



$ 


cts. 


155 


00 


12 


00 


2 


10 


108 


90 


24 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


i 




1 



$ cts. 



$322 00 



DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS, OTTAWA.— Eastern Block. 
SCHEDULE B. — A Summary of the Measurements of Work done. 





Valuation at Schedule and 
Progress Estimate Kates. 


Commissioners' Valuation. 


• 


$ cts. 

78,692 21 
9,077 82 




Omissions from contract at Schedule rates 






i 


Extra work at Progress Estimate rates 


69,614 39 

10,721 13 
82,666 27 

43,620 91 j 




Additional woik at Progress Estimate rates 


i 


Work for heating and ventilation at Progress Esti- 








Total carried to general summary 


$206,622 70 


$225,060 58 



ADOLPHE LEVEQUE, 
J. H. PATTISON. 



SCHEDDLB D 

(BA8I iikmknt ok WDBK DOOT 10 TiiK. BA8TBRH B100K OK the DBPABTIO I U mi n.nr.,.- mi i \w 1 
























: :::; 






Account of "VV 



December, 1860... 



The following w 



Soptember and 
March, 1860 



DEPAI 

schedu: 



Contract work at £ 
Omissions from co 



Extra work at Pro 

Additional woik a 

Work for heating 

mate rates 

T< 



^UjU ■ 



ADOLPHE LEVEQUE, 
J. H. PATTISON. 



69 



SCHEDULE b. 



DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS, EASTERN BLOCK.— Account of Work 
done. — Sundries charged Days' Work in the Estimates, 1860-61. 



Stepping rock foundations : 

181 days stone-cutter, at. 
17 " foreman, at 



Pumping Excavations : 

26 days labourer, at .. 

162 " do at.... 

60 M water cart, at 

20 " foreman, at... 

2 wood pumps, at 

1 iron do at 



$1 

5 



1 

1 

2 

20 

29 



50 
00 



75 
10 
87 
00 
00 
00 



Ramming Earth round foundations 

114 days labourer, at , 

20^ " foreman 



Removing Materials from site of Main Tower and Eastern Extension 

83 days labourer, at 

5 " team, at 

17 " foreman, at 



Covering foundation walls, temporary, as the work progressed : 

46£ days labourer, at 

2 u carpenter, at 



$1 
2 



$1 
3 
2 



$1 
2 



10 
00 



10 
00 
00 



10 
00 



Distempering Flues — Heating and Ventilating 
104^ days labourer, at 



$1 10 



Levelling Rock and clearing rubbish from line of Smoke Flues from Boiler 
House : 

6 days stone cutter, at , 

9 " quarryman, at 

10 " labourer, at 

1 " foreman, at 

Clearing rubbish from Main Lower Excavation, in the spring of 1861 : 

64 days labourer, at 

2 " horse, at 

8 " foreman, at 



Grinding Mortar to build Flues 

7 days labourer, at 

8 " horse, at 



00 
20 
10 
00 



10 

87 
00 



10 

87 



Removing a Spoil Bank, (not measured) 
24 days labourer, at . , 



$1 10 



Building specimens of Nepean Facing : 

10 days mason, at 

10 days labourer, at 



Taking down part of Front Wail, West Wing, to admit Basement 
Windows : 

13£ days mason, at 

26 " labourer, at 

2 " foreman, at 

Digging Foundation for Extra Wall in West Wing : 

8 days labourer, at 



00 
10 



00 
10 
00 



$1 10 



gii^T-y alterations in Masonry as the work progressed : 

1-& day's mason, altering position of a wall opposite a blank window 
to admit light, at 



$2 00 



Carried over 



10 



$ cts. 



271 50 
51 00 



19 50 
178 20 
112 20 
40 00 
40 00 
29 50 



125 40 
41 00 



91 30 
15 00 

34 00 



51 15 
4 00 



114 95 



12 00 

10 80 

11 00 
3 00 



70 40 

3 74 

16 00 



7 
13 


70 
09 


26 


40 


20 
11 


00 
00 



27 00 

28 60 
6 00 



8 80 



3 00 



$ cts. 



322 50 



419 40 
166 40 

140 30 

55 15 
114 95 



36 80 

90 14 

20 79 
26 40 

31 00 

61 6t 

8 86 

3 00 
1497 23 



70 



SCHEDULE £.— Departmental Buildings, Eastern Block. — {Concluded.) 



Brought forward 



7 
2 
]2i 
8 
8 



4 day^ mas oa, making windows to a door, at 2 00 

3 " mason, altering position of three windows, at - 2 00 

labourer, do at 1 10 

foreman, at 3 00 

mason, altering level of floor of main tower, at 2 00 

mason, altering position of two air ducts, at 2 00 

labourer, at 1 10 



Takiu»- down and re-building Cold Air Duet Arches, placed in a wrong 
level by the Clerk of Works : 

24 days mason, at $2 00 

24 " labourer, at 110 

2 " foreman, at 3 00 



Sundries — Heating and Ventilating : 

3 days stone-cutters, cutting register holes through base of main 

rower, at $2 00 

6 days bricklayers joining flues in east extension, at 2 00 

6 '" labourer, at 1 10 

26 " do removing concrete from top of vault, at 1 10 

6 " foreman, at 2 00 

1 " do at 3 00 

18 " carpentr protecting vault for the winter 1860-61 1 80 

3 " carpenter, at 1 40 

9 " labourer, at 110 

75 lbs. nails, at 05 

8000 feet B. M. lumber 



Erecting Roof over Boiler House for Protecting Boiler Builders: 

12 days carpenter, at 2 00 

16 " do at 1 40 

30 vards cotton, at 15 

4£ gall oil; at 1 25 

45,000 feet B. M. lumber, at 1 50 

Locks, 00b. \ nails, $2 50: spikes, 50c , 



Constructing R lievi g Arch over .Main Tower Entrance Door: 

26 .lavs stone-cutter, at 2 00 

2 '•' carpenter, at 2 00 

3 " foreman, at 3 00 

Altering Splays of Brick Jambs. Ground Floor Windows: 

66£ days bricklayer, at 2 00 

66£ " labourer, at 100 

9,600 bricks, at 8 00 

Mortar 

Totil amount of day's work accounts from the commencement of the Building 
to August 14, 1761, as s'nown in the Estimates 



$ ots. 



8 00 

6 00 

7 70 
fl 00 

2b 00 
16 00 

8 80 



48 00 

26 40 

6 00 



6 00 
12 00 

6 60 
28 60 
12 00 

3 00 
32 40 

4 20 
9 90 
3 75 

24 00 



24 00 
22 40 

4 50 

5 63 
67 50 

3 90 



52 00 
4 00 
6 00 



135 00 

73 50 

76 80 

11 52 



$ cts. 
1497 23 



77 50 



80 40 



142 45 



127 93 



62 00 



294 82 
2282 33 



Wm. HUTCHISON, 



Clerk of Works, E. B. 



Ottawa, 27th January, 1862. 



71 

SCHEDULE C. 

IVIEASUREMENT OF WORK DONE TO THE WESTERN BLOCK OF THE DEPARTMNTAL BUILDINGS, OTTAWA— FROM THE LEVEL OF THE FIRST FLOOR LINE UPWARDS. 





DESCRIPTION OF WORK. 


Contract Work. 


Omission 


f from Contract. 


E 


[tra Work. 


Additional Work. 


Heating 


and Ventilating. 


Total Measurement. 


Superfluous Work. 


No. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Qo.nti.ie. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Atnoon, 


Quantity 


Rate.J 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. | Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rote. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


AlDOUDt 


j 






238 23 


1 75 


418 00 


64 go 


$ cts. 
1 75 


112 00 




$ cts. 


$ ota. 


97 14 


$ eta. 
4 00 


$ cts. 
390 14 


39 12 


$ ots 
4 00 


$ cts. 
157 80 


1917 20 
173 19 
104 8 
10 10 


$ cts. 

3 75 

4 22 
-1 71 
6 33 


$ cte 

7191 52 
732 88 
404 36 
55 27 


, 


$ Ot8 


$ cts. 


2 
3 






































































































- r ' lb. 


1892 11 


2 53 


4787 79 
































« 














126 7 
13654 7 


6 00 
21 


757 55 
2867 46 








126 7 
14132 :\ 
6409 
11719 9 
6365 7 
2188 7 
1310 6 
2m2 3 
HIS 8 
1325 11 
1358 3 

;m 1 


6 00 
27 
12} 
84 
25 
40 
31 
50 
60 
50 
75 
08 


757 55 
3329 21 
SOI 13 
9S44 59 
1586 39 
876 43 
joi; 2:, 
1401 12 
659 31 
863 00 
1018 69 
66 10 


























527 8 
356 
338 2 
233 2 
173 6 
51 3 
126 1 


21 
12 
80 
26 
34 
31 
40 


110 81 
42 72 

270 63 
60 62 
58 99 
16 s< 
50 43 










6C53 


12 


726 36 




























2716 4 
1536 9 
514 
165 2 
822 2 
363 2 
232 4 
192 7 
609 8 


80 
26 
34 
31 
40 
60 
25 
30 
08 


2173 on 
399 56 
174 56 
51 20 
328 88 
181 58 
58 08 
57 77 
48 78 
396 66 
31 31 




















4943 7 
1873 6 
1221 10 
2028 4 
870 8 
1099 11 
1135 2 


42 
48 
50 
55 
52 
64 
62 


2076 16 
S99 28 
610 90 

1116 67 
452 74 
593 95 
703 80 


377 
:t;2 5 
127 7 
197 4 
115 2 
35 9 


42 
48 
50 
55 
62 
64 


166 74 
178 76 
63 78 
108 53 
59 89 
19 30 














































































do 




































































18 








572 50 
530 43 
2217 19 
1820 23 






30 00 
25 66 


























964 6 
BUMS 

288923 


55 
7 00 
6 30 


46 8 


55 


147 10 


55 














1061 10 
814783 
62S2H9 

9600 


65 
12 50 
12 60 
1:1 60 


585 66 








20 


UOSS 1 
39717 
9600 


13 SO 
13 80 
13 80 


152 25 
548 10 
132 JS 


2773 
125890 


13 SO 
13 80 


38 29 
1737 23 








21 








57912 


l:l 80 


790 18 


7852 01 
129 60 








!S 


















23 


Toronto do do 




9400 
12972 


20 (III 
38 00 


188 00 
492 93 


9400 
12972 


20 00 
38 00 


183 00 
492 93 




















2. 




































26 












5.0.2.23 


115 00 


579 05 












579 05 








26 






2576 
99927 


16 00 
19 00 


41 21 
1898 61 




























27 


























102503 
463 
29518 
138 91 
1.11 84 
138 91 
1294 
1111 
2970 
12.123 


23 00 

15 
12 00 

3 25 

4 50 

1 .,0 
12 
15 
15 

160 00 


2357 56 
69 15 
.1 2 1 
li 1.: 
61)8 28 
625 09 
165 28 
211 65 
445 60 
99 66 


















463 

29518 

138 91 


15 
12 00 
3 25 


69 45 
354 21 
451 46 












:i» 


i iinjj for du !i. M 

Foil fur do 

li Inch grouyod uii-l toogucd pinoroiflng boards to decks 




























































131 84 
133 91 
1294 
1255 

"•M.iVi 


2 45 
1 65 
12 
07 

" "o'lO 


323 20 
229 20 
165 28 
87 85 

121 79 












































































ss 


" "39.1.4 


" "s 10 


121*79 


156 


20 


31 20 


2970 
12.1.23 


15 
14 00 


450 50 
174 36 


















































21,062 97 






1,567 38 




4,782 02 













I 




















































ADOLPHE LEVEQUE. 
J. II. PATTISON. 



SCIIEDL 



1 days n 
3 " u 

7 " 1: 

2 •' P 
]2i - n 

8 " i) 
8 " 1 

Takiug down anc 

level by the 01 

24 days i 

24 -' 1 

2 " 1 



Sundries — Heatii 
3 days i 

tow 

6 days l 
6 " 1 
26 " 
6 " f 

I " 
18 " c 
3 " ( 

9 " 1 
75 lbs. 
8000 feet 

Erecting Roof o 

12 days 

16 " 

30 yards 

U gall 

45,1^00 

Locks, 

Constructing R 
26 Jays 

2 '•' 

3 " 

Altering Splay; 
60. S da J 
66J " 
9,600 b 
Mort'ir 

Total amount 
to Ausrust 



Ottawa, 27 



SCHEDULE C 

BBMBNT OP WORK DOflE TO THE DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS, WESTERN BLOCK. 




JOHM ll.Mii'i I 

GEO. li. J'KLIIAM, Clerk of World. 



SCIIEDL 



1 davs n 
3 " u 

7 - h 

2 " f« 
]2i - n 

8 " n 
8 " 1. 

Taking down auc 

level by the CI 

24 davs i 

24 '• 1 

2 " 1 



Sundries — Heatii 
3 days i 
tow 
6 days V 
6 " 1: 
26 " 
6 " f 
1 " 

15 " c 

8 " c 

9 " 1 
75 lbs. 

8000 feet 

Erecting Roof o 
12 days 

16 " 
30 yards 

4 J gill 
45,000 
Locks, 

Constructing R 
26 i lavs 

2 < : 

3 " 

Altering Splay.' 
6G£ day 
66£ " 
9,600 b 
Mortar 

Total amount i 
to August 



Ottawa, 27 



75 



SCHEDULE C. — Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block. — A 
Summary of the Measurements of Work done. 





Valuation at Schedule and 
Progress Estimate rates. 


Commissioners' Valuation. 




$ cts. 

65,041 10 
10,598 07 


$ cts. 






9 


54,443 03 

5,339 05 
55,560 48 

67,266 15 




Work for beating and ventilation at Progress Esti- 






j 




$182,608 69 


$187,451 26 







JOHN HARPER, Measurer. 

GEORGE B. PELHAM, Clerk of Works. 



SCHEDULE c. — Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block. — 
Account of Work done — ' Sundries' charged Days' Work in the Estimates, 
1860-61. 



Stepping Rock Foundations : 

24 days quarryman, at $1 20 

136 " stone-cutter, at 2 00 

2 " foreman, at 2 00 

6 " do 3 00 

| ■ 
Removing materials from Site of Boiler House and Main Sewer: 

24 days labourer, at 75 ' 

15 " do 1 10 j 

8 " team, at 2 50 

5 " do 3 00 ! 

Pumping Excavations : 

98 days labourer, at 1 10 

8 « foreman, at 2 00 

b\ " carpenter, at 2 00 

2 iron pumps 25 00 

Heating and Ventilating Protecting Vault for the Winter 1860-61 : 

4 days carpenter, at 2 00 

2 " do 1 SO 

1 u do 1 40 

3 " labourer, at 110 

3,000 feet B. M. lumber, at 3 00 

25 lbs. nails , 



Heating and Ventilating, Clearing Rubbish from line cf Flues and 
Boiler House : 

39 days labourer, at 1 10 

54 " distempering flues, at 1 10 



Grand Total 



$ cts. 

28 80 

272 00 

4 00 

18 00 



18 00 
16 50 
20 00 
15 00 



107 80 

16 00 

10 50 

50 00 



8 00 
3 60 
1 40 
3 30 

9 00 
1 25 



42 90 
59 40 



$ uts. 



322 80 



69 50 



184 30 



26 55 



102 30 



$705 45 



Ottawa, Jan. 16th, 1863. 



Wm, HUTCHISON, 

Clerk of Works, E. Block. 



76 



S CHE 
DETAILS of Work required for 



No. 


DESCRIPTION. 


Total Quantities included 


in Contract. 




Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


1 
2 

3 


Rock excavation to 5.00 deep.... 
Rock excavation to 10.00 do . .. 
Earth filling outside building..., 

Digging and re-filling for drains. 




do 
do 


2226 20 

1285 22 

19 10 

11632 18 

1973 

774 I 


$ cts. 

21 

52 
52 
10 
10 
88 


$ cts. 

467 61 

668 63 

10 07 


4 
5 
6 
7 




do 
do 


1163 26 
197 30 
681 41 
400 00 


8 










9 


4 inch drain laid in pugged clay. 
6 do do do 
9 do do do 
12 do do do 




do 


300 
300 
200 
100 
23 
2 

4 
2 
2 

1281 11 

1297 

1939 

84 

140 59 

1055 

20 

5917 52 

676 51 

656 47 

375 32 

19 L 39 

167 51 

167 51 

110 9 

103 48 

99 39 

99 39 

77 12 

44 48 

5 50 
8696 28 
6627 3-9 


42 

73 

1 05 
1 26 
1 00 
75 
60 

75 

1 00 
1 58 

1 58 

2 60 
2 60 
42 
25 


126 00 


10 




do 


219 00 


11 




do 


210 00 


1? 




do 


126 00 


13 
14 




do 


23 00 
1 50 


15 


Single 6 u do 




do 


2 40 


16 


Do 9 " do 




do 


1 50 


17 


Do 12 " do 




do 


2 00 


18 








2024 62 


19 


Concrete under basement floor.... 




do 


2049 26 


20 


Do to fire proof do .... 




do 


5041 40 


21 


Fine concrete in public hall 





do 


21 67 
59 05 


23 
24 


Pitch, tar and sand on walls.... 

Hubble masonry to level of main 
Do to 1st 10 above 
Do to 2nd 10 do 
Do to 3rd 10 do 
Do to 4th 10 do 
Do to 5th 10 do 
Do to 6th 10 do 
Do to 7th 10 do 
Do to 8th 10 do 
Do to 9th 10 do 
Do to 10th 10 do 
Do 11th 10.0 above 
Do 12th 10.0 
Do 13th 10.0 


do 


No. 
do 


263 75 
128 00 


5M» 






Bfi 






27 


do 


do 






27 


do 


do 






29 


do 


do 






30 


do 


do 






31 


do 


do 
do 






32 


do 






33 


do 


do 






34 


do 


do 






3ft 


do 


do 






36 


main cornice 


d<j 






37 


do 


do 






38 


do 


do 






39 






4 20 
52 


36524 38 


40 
41 




3446 21 


42 
43 
44 


Pointing to masonry with dark n 
Picked face work to limestone... 




do 


9381 8 
14224 1 

8163 2-9 
144 
116 8 


50 
17 
09 
17 
42 


4690 83 

2418 08 

734 69 


45 




do 


24 48 


46 


Chamfered work to do 
Picked face to Nepean 




do 


49 00 


47 




do 




48 


Chamfered to do 




do 








49 


Potsdam stone relieving arches.. 
Bricks laid in mortar 




do 








50 




M 


5202744 

3774 

3092 } 

87 1-C 

45 5-S 

129 


7 34 
02 

66 

1 75 

2 20 
1 00 


38188 14 


61 
52 






linl. ft. 


75 48 

2041 05 


53 






do 


152 44 


54 


Fire brick back hearths 




do 


100 22 


55 






No. 


129 00 














102462 43 

















77 



DULE D. 

completion of Parliament Buildings. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




1 
1 

2074 26 


$ cts. 

21 
52 
52 
10 
10 


$ cts. 

435 75 
281 57 
10 07 
186 38 
197 30 


380 18 
744 9 


$ cts. 

25 

1 00 


$ cts. 

95 17 
744 75 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


541 13 






| 


19 10 








1863 21 












1 


1973 


1822 
887 0J 


35 

1 20 


637 70 
1064 80 














1 






400 00 
















































52 


73 

1 05 


37 96 

87 85 


248 

116 04 

213 

23 

2 

4 

2 

2 

1200 

1524 15 

2804 

8 0J 

140.59 


1 25 

1 55 

2 10 
1 50 
1 00 

90 

1 50 

2 00 
1 50 
1 50 
4 00 
4 00 
75 


310 

180 32 

447 30 

34 50 

2 00 

3 60 

3 00 

4 00 
1800 00 
2286 83 

11216 00 

33 33 

105 44 










82 Of 






















































































































23 


2 60 


59 80 


































1055 


25 


263 75 
128 00 


























4468 23 




1118 10 

640 48 

570 4 

332 45 

191 39 

167 51 

167 51 

110 9 

103 48 

99 39 

99 39 

77 12 

44 48 

5 50 


7 50 

8 44 

9 48 
10 66 

12 00 

13 50 
15 18 
17 08 
19 20 
21 60 
24 30 
27 34 
30 76 
34 60 


8386 39 
5407 22 
5404 30 
3548 00 
2300 60 
2267 25 
2549 39 
1881 64 
1994 66 
2154 00 
2423 25 
2111 25 
1380 78 
205 03 


55 11 


7 50 


414 02 




109 21 








109 21 






13 33 
9 14 


9 48 
10 66 


129 03 
98 70 




42 21 








4729 32 


4 20 


19864 29 






























1 












| 












1 












' '"1 












1 . 












i 






































4192 1-9 


52 


2179 90 


















23611 6 
4740 6 
6561 6 
9637 4-9 


27 
44 
20 
20 


6375 11 










4634 5 


50 


2317 21 
1233 49 


2085 82 
1312 20 
1927 49 










7255 10 17 
































1 






















144 

116 8 

1425 4 

2349820 

1071 

2382 

87 1-9 

49 69 

141 


20 
30 
55 
12 50 
05 

1 80 
6 50 

2 70 
2 00 


28 80 

35 00 

783 93 

29372 75 

53 55 

4287 60 

566 22 

135 10 

282 00 






































2688469 


7 34 
02 
76 


19733 36 

54 06 

105 26 


445,226 


12 50 


5565 33 




2703 




138* 


1,189J 


1 80 


2141 10 
























1 












1 














47576 00 






108228 13 






8348 18 










...... 




, 







78 






S CHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No. 



56 

57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 



DESCRIPTION 



Brought forward. 



Total Quantities included in Contract. 



Quantities. 



Grates , 

Block limestone 

Sank face to do 

Brockvide stone 

Plain face to do 

Do circular to do 

Sunk face to do 

Do circular to do 

Chamfered to do , 

Moulded to do 

Do circular to do 

Moulded stops 

Ohio stone 

Plain face to do 

Circular do to do 

Sunk face do 

Do circular do 

Chamfered do 

Moulded do 

Do circular do 

Carved work do 

Under-cut moulded do 

Do circular do 

Rubbed 

Moulded stops 

Turning 6 inch diam ; ballusters in Ohio stone. 

Carving to caps of do 6 inches high ,. 

Moulded bases do 

Holes for stanchion bars 

Ohio stone chimney pieces 

Do do 

Dressing and cleaning cut stone 

Marble, Arnprior or other approved 

Plain face to be polished 

Circular do 



Sunk face do 

Do circular do 

Moulded work do 

Do circular do 

Chamfered do 

Caived work do 

Moulded stops do 

Circular plain face to marble 

Sunk face do do 

do circular do 

inch Marble landings 

" Rubbed Ohio hearths 

" Nepean in flues , 

" do under joists 

" do do in ducts. 
Sunk work to do 

2 inch limestone flagging 

3 " do under joists , 



. No. 
. cube ft 
. sup ft. 
. cube ft. 
. sup ft. 
. do 

do 

do 
. do 

do 
. do 
. No 
. cube ft. 
. sup ft. 

do 
. do 
. do 
. do 
. do 
. do 

do 

do 
. do 
. do 
. No. 
. linl. ft. 
. No. 
. do 
. do 

do 

do 

do 
. cube ft. 
. sup ft. 

do 

do 
. do 
. do 
. do 
. do 
. do 
. No; 
.super. 

do 

do 
. do 
. do 
. do 
. do 
. do 

do 
. do 
, do 



Rate. 



ft. 



Carried over. 



12179 

4S78 

1628 1 

549 6 

44 6 



999 
60 
22 

24 
8 

14 i 

123213 7 ! 

50020 2 I 

6478 2 

47009 11 i 

10622 3 | 

842 9 ] 

22232 3 

24777 11 

4007 

7S 2 

1347 6 

237 1 

1296 

884 2 

402 

40 

1648 

27 

102 



10494 3 

4179 3 

1431 1 

377 4 



1572 8 

5894 3 

655 10 

1057 9 

264 

336 

194 7 

85 

312 

1018 



5361 7 



15 
36 
50 
23 
35 
56 
84 
42 
53 
42 
36 
45 
22 
30 
35 
50 
24 
31 
48 
76 
31 
48 



20 

34 

1 00 
70 
05 

12 00 
25 00 



1 05 
53 

74 
74 



06 
59 



74 
2 00 
53 
47 
47 
68 
30 
30 



08 



Amount. 



$ cts.j $ cts. 
......... 102462 43 



1826 85 

1756 08 

814 04 

126 39 

15 58 

599 53 

50 47 

9 28 

12 81 

3 43 

5 04 

55446 20 

11004 43 

1943 45 

16453 48 

5311 12 

202 26 

6892 00 

11893 40 

3045 32 

24 23 

646 80 



259 20 

300 61 

402 00 

28 00 

82 40 

324 00 

2550 00 



11018 96 

2215 00 

1059 00 

279 22 



1667 02 

9371 85 

485 32 

2115 50 

139 92 

157 92 

91 45 

57 80 

93 60 

305 40 



428 93 



253977 72 



79 



D U L E D. 



of Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work forHeating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amouut. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
47576 00 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
108228 13 
2538 00 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
8348 18 


$ cts. 






141 


18 00 








































1628 1 


50 
23 
35 
56 
84 
42 
53 
42 
36 
45 
22 
30 
35 
50 
24 
31 
48 
76 
31 
48 


814 04 

126 39 

15 58 

599 53 

50 47 

9 28 

12 81 

3 43 

5 04 

19788 75 

2682 86 

707 97 

4136 45 

1992 08 

91 92 

2264 91 

4534 52 

1107 00 

24 23 

646 80 
















549 6 
















44 6 
















999 2 
















60 1 
















22 I 
















24 2 
















8 2 
















14 
















43975 


95230 11 
38170 

3771 2 
40918 4 

6712 10 

436 11 

14895 7 

15307 4 

2218 9 


84 
25 
35 
40 
50 
31 
50 

75 

1 50 


79993 97 
9542 50 
1319 91 

16367 33 

3356 41 

135 44 

7447 79 

11400 50 
3328 13 


978 
733 6 


84 
25 


821 52 
183 37 




12194 10 




2359 11 




11818 5 


626 6 
81 
45 

314 


40 
50 
31 
50 


250 60 
40 50 
13 95 

157 00 




3984 2 
383 





7306 2 




9446 11 




1456 7 


14 


1 50 


21 00 




78 2 




1347 6 
















237 1 
















518 


20 


103 60 


744 
884 2 
402 

40 
1464 

39 
102 


50 

50 

1 50 
1 00 
10 

16 00 
30 00 


372 00 

442 08 

603 00 

4 00 

146 40 

624 00 

3060 00 

1200 00 

19503 30 

6325 13 

4164 16 

1130 83 

115 50 

5426 40 

24785 58 

1639 58 

6346 50 

396 00 

537 60 

383 33 

336 00 

156 00 

559 00 


48 


50 


24 00 




































84 


05 


4 20 


















































10835 2 

4216 9 

1665 8 

452 4 

35 

1722 8 

6015 11 

655 10 

1057 9 

264 

336 

239 7 

140 

312 

1118 


1 80 

1 50 

2 50 

2 50 

3 30 

3 15 

4 12 ' 
2 50 

6 00 
1 50 
1 60 

1 60 

2 40 
50 
50 



















































































































































































































500 


15 


75 00 










2426 


15 


363 90 










14975 6 

1095 

14975 6 


30 


4492 65 






























09 


1347 80 










































87297 86 






322358 40 






15775 67 




1 






1 











80 

S C HE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No. 



109 

no 
in 



112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 

121 

122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 

135 

136 



137 



138 
139 
140 

141 

142 
143 

144 



DESCRIPTION. 



Total Quantities included in Contraot. 



Brought forward 



Quantities. 



4 inch Limestone underjoists sup. ft. 

6 " do do do 

1 " Slate to urenals, sawn, rubbed, and made hot, and 
thoroughly saturated with pure oil, grooved, cramped, 
and fixed together, joints made in red and white lead.... do 

f do do do do 

6x8 do do do lineal ft. 

Circular sunk work to do super, ft 

1 inch Slate to Louvres do 

Wood Bricks F. B. M. 

Centreings , sup. yds 

Ribbed centreings lineal ft 

9x3 wall plates and bond timber do 

Pine lintels F. B. M 

Pine in joists, &c do | 

do roofs do 

do do wrought and chanfered do 

1^ Roof boarding, 9 inches wide, laid close squares. 

do do tongued and grooved do 

1£ Boarding to decks in 2 thicknesses, 6 inches wide, 
lower thickness laid close, upper grooved and tongued do 

4x2 scantling in quartered partitions lineal ft. 

4x3 do do do 

6x2 do do do 

6x4 do do do 

3 inch plank gangway in roofs F. B. M. 

Hardwood blocks in roof framing do 

2x1 slate battons lineal ft. 

Sound boarding on fillets square. 

Bracketting sup. feet. 

i>oarding under concrete floors squared. 

2 x 2 fillets in concrete lineal ft. 

1£ x li do tirrings for ceilings do 

4x4 do do do 

1£ best quality tongued and grooved red pine floor 

boards, not exceeding 6 inches in width squares. 

1^ do do white oak do 

l£ ciean wrought and chamfered red pine skirtings, 9 
ir-ches high and 2£ moulding on the top, scribed and 
back filleted to floors, on 3 inch grounds and wood 
bricks at 30 feet apart lineal ft. 

li Clean white oak, 15 inches high, double faced, cham- 
fered edge 4 inch moulding on top, with grounds fillets 
and wood bricks as above do 

1 white oak do 4 inches high do 

2 inch do do rounded, 9 inches high do 

I matched wrought and double stop chamfered oak 

sheeting on 3 tiers of 3 x 1 grounds sup. ft. 

J wrought matched chamfered and tongued pine board- 
ing to ceilings in 6 inch widths squares. 

Pine mouldings to do sup. ft. 

do circular do do 

3 inch Enrichments to mouldings lineal ft. 

Carried over : 



16 4 

292 8 



295 6 

411 2 

102 

76 6 

608 

5034 

3865 7-9 

1583 10 

12287 6 

1681 9 

117147 

240109 10 

29880 

82035 



Rate, 
e 11 



56 17 

1112 

1106 

2832 6 

1426 

8467 6 

270 

93125 

14059 

3080 

78534 2 

78533 

78533 



squares feet. 
552 72 
296 68 



14960 6 



1050 

316 

40 

556 6 

40131 

41589 

304 

9526 



$ cts, 



09 
12 



20 
18 
66 
34 

20 
9 80 

1 05 
16 
03 
9 80 

15 40 
20 30 
35 00 

2 45 



Amount. 



65 

03 
03 



03 

03 

12 00 

25 20 

00i 



57 
11 

57 



01 
01 



3 50 
5 25 



17 



34 
04 
14 

09 

3 50 
14 
21 
10 



$ ets. 

253977 72 

1 47 

35 12 



51 90 

74 01 

67 32 

26 01 

121 60 

49 33 

4059 06 

253 41 

368 62 

16 47 

1804 06 

4874 21 

1045 80 

2009 85 



373 53 

33 36 

33 18 

84 97 

42 78 

101 60 

6 80 

465 62 

220 72 

338 80 

1232 98 

785 33 

785 33 



1934 52 
1557 57 



2543 28 



357 00 

12 64 

5 60 

50 00 

1719 58 

5822 46 

63 84 

952 60 



288360 05 



81 



DULE D. 

of Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






V C XiOrn 


$ cts. 
87297 86 




$ cts 


$ cts. 
322358 40 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
15775 57 


$ cts. 










































259 6 
411 2 

102 

76 6 

608 

516 

2679 7-9 

140 

12287 6 

4S6 3 

99996 

241279 10 

29880 


30 


1 

77 85 
















27 I 111 01 

1 00 i 102 00 
50 I 38 25 

30 j 182 40 
18 00 j 9 28 

1 35 3617 70 
12 ! 16 80 




















































4518 


9 80 
1 05 
16 


44 28 
772 10 
231 01 










735 3-9 


541£ 


1 35 


731 02 




1443 10 






05 
18 00 
18 00 
23 00 
30 00 


614 38 

8 74 

1799 92 

5549 41 

896 40 










1437 9 


9 80 


14 08 


























3402 


23 00 


78 24 
































824 72 
56 17 


4 50 
8 00 


3711 24 
449 36 









































































































8467 6 

270 

93670 

14059 

3080 

113557 

78533 

78533 

88 

squares ft. 

586 90 

297 38 

15660 6 

1050 

316 

40 

555 6 

49539 6 

41832 

304 

9591 


15 00 
40 00 
00i 
2 25 
11 
2 00 
01 
01 
02 

5 00 


127 00 
108 00 
468 35 
316 32 
338 80 
2271 14 
785 33 
785 33 
1 76 

1 

1 2934 50 


































































637 59 


1 57 


1001 01 




































































9 00 J 2676 42 














■ 


20 

40 
06 
20 

09 

5 00 
20 
30 
15 


5132 10 

420 00 

18 96 

8 00 

50 00 

2476 97 

8366 40 

91 20 

1438 65 












































































































































89360 34 






366358 37 






16584 83 








( 






. 





11 



82 



1 ' " ' f~ -r- 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for the completion 



No. 



145 
146 
147 
148 
149 

150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 

156 
157 
158 

159 

160 
161 
162 

163 
164 

165 

166 
167 

168 
169 

170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 



DESCRIPTION. 



Total Quantities included in Contract. 



Quantities. Rate. Amount 



BroughtTorward. 



| Pierced panel work super, ft. 

li angle beads linl. ft. 

2\ rolls for lead do 

2£ inch bip and ridge rolls, including irons do 

1^ " pine treads, with rounded and moulded nosings to 

raised floors of bouses.. supl. ft, 

1 incb risers to do ,*,»- do 

2\ a wrought and cut strings to do do 

3 .' dovetailed, tongued and grooved cisterns do 

3 ° do do do do 

Forming bottom of baths p\ j} # ^ 

Step-ladders, 12 m 3 sides, 9 h 2J tread, with handrails 

and ballisters Noofsteps 

J inch matched sheeting SU p t ^ 



2 
24' 



1 " framed and boxed casings to pipes 

lj " wrought, Earned, moulded and panelled casings 

" under washstands in lavatories . mt \ 

\\ " wrought linings 

l£ " battenel shutters 

6 x 3 wrought, rebated, and dovetailed frames ... linl. ft. 

6 inch skylight bars, 6 h2 head and side, 6 h 3 bottom 
rail, 8 m 3 

2 " do moulded and rebated ....".'..." 

2 " pine wrought framed, 4 panel, stop chamfered both 

.sides, doors 

2 " pine do 6 panel do with Sf moulding 
in panels 

pine do 6 circular headed do ....... 

white oak do 6 panel do moulded, doubio 
hung 

2£ " do 6 raised panels, do 

3 " do 12 deeply moulded, 1 mem- 
ber carved do 

(Carved caps to do, 1.3 x 0.9 

3 inch white oak panel over doors, solid forcarving...." supLft 

4 m 3 pine, wrought, rebated, and chamfered frames linl. ft 

6 * 3 do do and double stop chamfered do do 

6 x * do do circular da do 

6x3 do moulded transom [[[ do 

6 * 4 white oak, wrought and rebated frames"..".'//.".'."'..' do 

6 M 4 do d <> circular' "do" ... do 

6 M 6 do wrought, rebated, and chamfered do do 

6 * 6 do do circular do 

6x6 do moulded transom do 

Small dormers, complete, as per specincation".''.'.'"".'.'.'"" No 



do 

do 
do 
do 



supl. ft 
do 

do 

do 
do 

do 
do 

do 
No. 



Large dormers, do do 

Circular-headed, 2 incb moulded double sash/ in" *4* "*M 
5 wrought, rebated, chamfered and moulded frames, 
with moulded transom and ornamental carved brackets' 
proper boxed insido frames, patent lines, brass axle 
pulleys, iron weights and best sash fastener, complete 
with two Venetian blinds, wrought, framed and moulded, 

Carried over 



do 



710 8 

4178 

2768 

1344 

9753 

2094 
680 

2160 

1856 

336 

687 

2095 
1849 

2138 

40 

90 

120 

6540 
606S 

164.5 

1628 
5134 4 

650 6 
144 

425 

20 

75 

1015 

3654 6 

996 

456 4 

253 

125 

180 

70 

50 

86 

42 



$ ots. 



38 
03 
02 
03 



05 
03 
06 
12 
10 



40 
031 
06 

25 
08 
08 
04 

32 
16 

28 

30 
30 

60 

90 

1 25 

75 



$ cts. 

288360 05 

270 05 

125 34 

55 36 

40 32 

487 65 

62 82 

40 80 

259 20 

185 60 

5 00 

274 80 

73 32 

110 94 

534 50 

3 20 
7 20 

4 80 



1 


25 





05 





09 





12 


1 


07 





15 





25 





25 


6 


38 





30 


3 


00 


12 


00 



2092 80 
970 88 

460 60 

48S 40 
1540 30 

390 30 
129 60 

531 25 

15 00 

93 75 

50 75 

328 91 

119 52 

31 94 

37 95 

31 25 

45 00 

26 60 

15 00 

258 00 

504 00 



299062 75 



88 



3E2 



DULE D. 

of Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE EOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Kate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
89360 34 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

366358 37 

355 33 

173 52 

83 04 

100 90 

731 47 

104 70 

61 20 

432 00 

278 40 

8 00 

343 50 

83 80 

147 92 

855 20 
4 80 

9 00 
7 20 

3270 00 
1517 00 

663 25 

455 84 
1884 51 

520 40 
144 00 

637 50 

20 00 

112 50 

146 48 

450 06 

188 64 

60 29 

50 60 

37 50 

54 00 

31 50 

20 00 

528 GO 

1344 00 




$ cts, 


$ cts. 
16584 83 


$ cts. 






710 8 
4338 
2768 
1441 6 

9753 
2084 

680 
2160 
1856 

336 

687 
2095 
1849 

2138 

40 

90 

120 

6540 
6068 

2653 

1628 
5384 4 

650 6 
144 

425 

20 

75 

1831 

3750 6 

1048 

482 4 

253 

125 


50 
04 
03 
07 

07* 
05 
09 
20 
15 
































! 












i 















1 


















































































50 
04 
08 

40 
12 
10 
06 

50 
25 

25 

28 
35 

80 

1 00 

1 50 
1 00 
1 50 
08 
12 
18 
12^ 
20 
30 
30 
45 
40 
6 00 
32 00 


























































































































































































































































i 









































































' 180 
















70 
50 
88 
42 






































































89300 U 




| 


382274 42 






16584 83 










! 









84 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No, 



184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 

193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 

202 
203 
204 
205 
205 
206 

207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
115 
216 
217 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 



DESCRIPTION. 



Total Quantities included in Contract. 



Brought forward. 



Quantities. 



upper part fixed — lower part hung to transom, with 

proper rollers so as to slide into walls supl. ft. 

Do do without Venetian hlinds do 

Circular-headed, frame and double, 2 inch fan lights do 

inch do moulded sash and frame do 

** double sash and frame do 

" fan lights, moulded do 

" framed, moulded and panelled jamb linings do 

" chamfered architraves do 

" do circular do 

" stop chamfered architraves, with 2£ bead roll to 

finish in block at base do 

" do do Circular do do 

"tracery to glazed" partition do 

2 " moulded window boards do 

Carving 2*} cable moulding to architraves lin. fi. 

Do do circular do do 

1$ " panelled and moulded closet front sup. ft. 

2 " do do do do 

2 '.' do do do dado do 

4 " wrought, moulded and quatrefoiled panelled gallery 
front do 

8 h4 moulded capping to do lin. ft. 

w 4 do walnut do, polished do 

5 " oak moulded capping do 

2£ "oak handrail do 

3 " oak do do 

3£ round do, polished and fastened to wall by suitable 

iron brakets , do 

5x3 moulded do, polished do 

li " white oak seat and riser to W. C sup. ft. 

1£ " do flaps to do do 

1£ " do moulded bath front do 

1 shelf on bearer «•« do 

Cloak rail and pegs... lin. ft. 

Holes cut and dished to W. C No. 

Beaded handle holes do 

Shutters formed in pipe casings do 

Doors formed in lavatory enclosures do 

Fixing locks to doors do 

Lift apparatus, with pullies, cords and weights complete do 

2i inch brass butt hinges and screws pairs. 

4 " do do , do 

Patent saving hinges do 

6 inch Brass butts and screws do 

Iron pivot hinges sets. 

Long brass flush belts No. 

Brass knobs do 

Tarnbuckles do 

Ornamented enamelled ware handles , do 

Hooks to step-ladders do 

Door locks 

Melbourne duchess slating, 2 copper nails (5 lb. to the 

thousand) to each slate square. 

Carried over...., 



7833 5 

678 10 

113 11 

90 6 

812 6 

694 

3227 3 

1260 

33 4 

6355 5 

2457 8 

93 9 

1332 6 

3447 

1339 6 

290 

176 

160 

518 

444 

444 

202 



52 6 

436 

441 

252 

36 

1002 

5 

42 

42 

58 

14 

324 



114 

311 

20 

21 
4 

20 

58 

70 

40 

44 



683 87 



Rate. 



$ cts, 



85 
70 
70 
35 
70 
15 
25 
10 





15 



13 

19 
50 
07 
05 
07 
20 
25 
25 

52 
12 
25 
10 



26 
26 
20 
20 
25 
06 
06 
15 
15 
25 



30 



20 

50 

20 00 



1 00 
4 00 
3 50 
10 

10 

1 50 
10 



6 70 



Amount. 



$ cts. 
299062 75 



6658 40 

475 18 

79 74 

31 67 

568 75 

104 10 

806 81 

126 00 

5 00 

826 20 
466 96 
46 87 
93 27 
172 35 
93 76 
58 00 
44 00 
40 00 

269 36 
53 28 

111 00 
20 20 



13 65 

113 36 

88 20 

50 40 

9 00 
60 12 
30 00 

6 

6 



30 
30 



14 50 



97 20 



22 80 
155 50 
400 00 
21 00 
16 00 
70 00 



80 
00 
00 
40 



4581 92 
315993 10 



85 



DULE D. 

of Parliament Buildings. — Continued, 



Contract work executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Bate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
89360 34 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
382274 42 

10499 68 

767 36 

91 13 

49 77 

650 00 

197 25 

1123 77 

236 94 

13 80 

-1324 13 

771 37 

70 31 

129 51 

286 00 

169 38 

58 00 

44 00 

45 00 

414 40 
88 80 

177 60 
30 30 

20 10 
105 88 

21 00 
174 40 
132 30 

75 60 

12 60 

inn 9ft 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
16584 83 


$ cts. 






8399 9 
807 9 
113 11 


1 25 
95 
80 
55 
80 
25 
25 
12£ 
18 

20 
30 
75 
09 
08 
12 
20 
25 
25 

80 
20 
40 
15 
30 
35 

40 
40 
30 
30 
35 
10 










































90 6 

812 6 

789 

4495 1 

1895 6 

76 8 

6620 8 

2571 3 

93 9 

1439 

3575 

1411 6 

290 

176 

180 

518 
444 
444 
202 
67 
302 6 

52 6 
436 
441 
252 

36 
1002 

5 
42 
42 
58 
14 

378 

6 
114 
363 

20 

21 
4 

20 

58 

70 

40 

44 

378 

squares ft. 

688 62 












































1712 3 


25 


482 06 






































































































































































































































































































































10 ' 50 
20 8 40 
20 8 40 
40 23 20 












































































40 

40 00 

25 

75 
30 00 

1 50 
6 00 
5 00 
12i 
15 

2 00 
20 

3 00 

8 50 


151 20 

240 00 

28 50 

272 25 

600 00 

31 50 

24 00 

100 00 

7 25 
10 50 
80 00 

8 80 
1134 00 

5853 27 




































































































































- 














































































S9?6) 34 






398736 77 1 






17066 89 





86 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No. 



! Total Quantities included in Contract. 



DESCRIPTION 



240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 

240 
247 
248 
249 
250 

251 

252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 

273 

274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
281 
232 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 



Brought forward. 



Melbourne duchess slating, 3 nails to each slate squares. 

Mortar under slates do 

No. 24 galvanized iron steps and ridges sup. feet. 

do do vallies do 

de do flashings do 

Galvanized iron and other fire-proof material for venti- 
ducts in roof do 

2 Coat plastering on lath sup. yds. 



do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 



do 
da 
do 
do 

do 
do 



to ceilings set white 
partitions do 



do 
do 

on walls do 

on lath, hard set with marble 

dust to ceilings do 

to partitions do 

on walls do 



Quantities. Bate. Amount. 



125.92 

376.58 

3467 10 

4708 2 

5750 



$ cts. 



Portland cement on concrete floors. 



. do 

3 Coats lime-washing do 

White glazed earthenware tiles sup. feet. 

Portland cement skirtings, 6 inches high, chamfered lin'l feet. 



do do 10 " do moulded 

do do 15 " do 

Moulded cornice with 2 enrichments 18 inches 
do do 20 « 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



;irth.... 
do .... 
do do do 24 " do .... 

Cast iron work cwt. 

do ornamental do do 

Hoop iron bond do 

Wrought iron in cramps do 

do chain bond do 

do bolts and straps do 

do saddle bars and stanchions do 

do ornamental strap hinges do 

do 17 doors..... do 

Terminal to main tower, say 

Steps in circular iron staircase, each step containing 208 

lbs. cast iron and 14 lbs. wrought No. 

Wrought iron casements do 

Cast iron air bricks do 

Chubbs locks to iron doors do 

Rolled iron joists tons. 

4 coats best oil colors sup. yds. 

Clean st:iined and twice varnished to pine do 

Twice oiling to oak floors do 

Twice oiling and twice varnishing to oak do 

Finishing in Chinese blue do 

ilding i inches. 

German sheet glass sup. feet. 

Chance's best 26 oz. sheet glass do 

do do ground do 

Chances 30 oz. rough glass do 

British plate glass, polished do 

Rough plate, £ inch thick do 

Diapered glass, of the value of 4s. per foot, leaded up 

with strong church lead do 



4537 5-9 

2011 

16 

4575 

4362 2-9 

707 

28448 6-9 

12793 4-9 



1104 

4613 

1509 

570 

192 

2764 

188 

196 

100 2 

84 

30 

3 

60 

102 

96 

14 



6 70 
60 
19 
16 
16 



$ «ts. 

315093 10 

843 66 
188 29 
658 88 
753 30 
600 00 



118 27 



Carried over. 



35 

32 

20 

15 

215 9 1 13 

5674 4 9 

22668 3-9 

3296 4-9 

741 2-9 

120 

41400 

3107 7 

10755 4 

5303 

5995 

466 

32 1 

3481 1 



12 \ 
19 ' 
18 
15 

22 
22 
18 
56 
03 
30 
09 
15 
22 
30 
31 






37 


3 


15 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


7 


00 


12 


60 


9 


00 


17 50 


12 


60 


12 


00 


14 


00 





20 


20 


00 


115 


00 


9 
n 


14 
11 



07 
11 
15 
01 
12i 
21 
28 
25 
85 

75 

1 00 



544 50 

382 09 

2 88 

686 25 

959 68 

155 54 

5120 76 

7164 32 

33 12 

1383 90 

135 81 

85 50 

42 24 

829 20 

58 28 

72 62 

317 26 

420 00 

150 00 

33 66 

425 87 

1294 76 

866 49 

251 87 

1489 84 



420 00 

448 00 

4 00 

300 00 

21778 84 

794 42 

2493 51 

230 75 

81 53 

18 00 

414 00 

388 44 

2258 62 

1484 84 

1498 75 

396 16 

24 00 

3481 08 



331458 51 



87 



DULE D. 

of Parliament Buildings — . Continued. 



Contract work executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional "Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ Ct3. 


$ cts. 
89360 34 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

398736 77 

1133 28 

282 43 

809 06 

2114 54 

1500 00 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
17066 89 


$ cts. 






125.92 

376.58 

404*5 4 

8458 2 

3750 


9 00 
75 
20 
25 
40 








• 








"";*; i 




















































27841 
1056 


40 
15 


11136 40 
158 40 










4537 5-9 
27114-9 


15 
21 


680 63 
569 40 
































6029 
4362 2-9 


17 
35 


1024 93 
1526 77 






















• 






















29155 6-9 

13633 4-9 

1104 

4613 

1769 

773 

192 


30 
75 
03 
40 
10 
17 
25 


8746 70 

10225 08 

33 12 

1845 20 

176 90 

131 41 

48 00 

1105 60 

84 60 

107 80 

601 95 

897 42 









































































I 














:....:.::::::.:.: 














2764 40 
















188 

196 

133 3 3 

149 2 8 


45 
55 
4 50 
6 00 




















































6 2 22 


5 00 


33 48 












3 1 13 


11 20 


37 70 










6 1 22 


7 00 

12 60 

9 00 


45 13 

161 89 

24 03 










12 3 11 


f 144 1 6 

93 2 12 

14 1 16 

118 27 


14 00 
28 00 
28 00 
22 40 


2020 25 
2621 00 

403 00 
2648 60 

150 00 

525 00 
224 00 


4 2 


14 00 


63 00 




2 2 19 
















































35 
32 


15 00 

7 00 












































15 

101 4 2 22 

5883 8-9 

23513 

3296 4-9 

741 2-9 

120 

41400 

3195 4 

11523 4 

5303 

5995 

466 

32 

8481 1 


25 00 
115 00 
25 
20 
10 
20 
50 
03 
20 
30 
40 

35 

1 25 
1 00 

1 10 


375 00 

11641 99 

1470 97 

4702 60 

329 65 

148 24 

60 00 

1242 00 

639 06 

3457 00 

2121 20 

I 2098 25 

582 50 

32 00 

3829 19 










191 16 7 


115 90 


22057 36 






















■ 




123 5-9 


20 


24 71 






































■ 
















.. 


















! 














1 






























■ 


. 




















































ma$2 23 






1473740 79 






28395 40 





88 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No. 


DESCRIPTION. 


Total Quantities included in Contract. 




Quantities. 


Bate. 


Amount. 








$ cts. 


$ eta. 
381458 51 


298 
?9Q 




do 


1297 1 3 
109 2 9 
1332 
240 
1695 
2256 
1200 
7582 

7 
42 
12 
26 

52 
52 
52 

2 


7 00 
7 70 
35 
12* 
30 
30 
25 
12+ 

4 00 

17 50 

2 00 

4 00 

5 00 


9080 93 
*843 76 


800 




lbs. * 


466 20 


301 
302 


2 H do do 


linl. ft. 

do 


30 00 

508 50 


303 


2 " do do for gas main 


do 


676 80 


304 


\ ** do do do 


do 


325 00 


30* 




do 


947 75 


306 

307 
308 


Cast iron sinks, 2.11 x 1.5£ * 5£ deep, with bell trap, 
Queen's ware pan water closet, apparatus complete do 


28 00 

735 00 

24 00 


309 




do 


104 00 


310 


Enamelled iron basins, in enamelled iron shelves 
Copper plugs and washers to do 


do 


260 00 


311 


do 




312 
313 


Patent cocks, white metal taps do 

Best enamelled copper baths, with «hower attached, with 
washers waste and traps complete, with hot and cold 


1 50 
40 00 


78 00 
80 00 


314 




do 




315 


Bells 


do 




31 r> 










317 


LIBRARY ABOVE PLINTH. 

Rubble masonry to level of cornice of main build 
Do 1st 10 above do do 
Do 2nd 10 above do do 
Do 3rd 10 above do do 
Do 4th 10 above do do 
Do 5th 10 above do do 
Do 6th 10 above do do 
Do 7th 10 above do do 

Nepean facing 


do 


610 51 

270 45 

225 25 

216 3 

25 41 

16 

36 

21 

1422 03 

214 22 






318 







319 


do 






320 


do 






3?1 


d0 






3?? 


do 






3?3 


do 






3U 


do 






325 

326 

2?7 


do 

, , sup. ft. 


4 20 
1 58 


5972 63 
339 40 


328 
329 


612 5-9 


52 


318 52 


330 






874 2-9 
1516 
2274 


09 
50 
17 


78 68 


331 






758 00 


332 




linl. ft. 


386 58 


333 


Potsdam arches 


do 




334 




^ M 


939.360 

1022 6-9 

133 

13016 11 

3460 5 

5987 11 

3618 

780 9 

3397 2 

197 4 

64 

56 


7 34 
87 
02 
15 
30 
36 
36 
50 
36 

75 

1 80 
25 


6894 90 


335 






889 72 


336 
337 
338 




linl. ft. 


2 66 
1952 53 
1038 13 


339 




do 


2155 65 


340 




do 


1302 48 


341 




do 


390 38 


342 


Chamfered do 


do 


1222 98 


343 




do 


148 00 


344 






115 20 


345 




do 


14 00 














419626 83 















89 



DULE D. 



of Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities, i Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Bate. 


Amount. 






| 

$ cts. 

i 
i 


§ cts. 
111682 23 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

473740 79 

18161 87 

1534 13 

666 00 

36 00 

593 25 

789 60 

390 00 

1137 30 

42 00 

1680 00 

30 00 

130 00 

390 00 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
28395 40 


$ cts. 




1297 1 3 
109 2 9 
1332 

240 
1695 
2256 
1300 

7852 

7 
42 

12 
26 
52 
52 
52 

2 

13 
150 


14 00 
1 14 00 
50 
. 15 
35 
35 
30 
15 

6 00 
40 00 

2 50 
5 00 

7 50 




i 


















































































































































......... .:... 












































2 00 

1 
50 00 
12 50 
5 00 


104 00 

100 00 

162 50 

750 00 

2440 00 

Total co 1 
7571 25 
2635 31 
2650 01 
3502 60 
1862 22 
1845 00 
1502 82 
1667 51 
































































502877 44 








1009 27 
312 13 
279 29 
328 31 
155 10 
136 36 
99 
97 34 


7 50 

8 44 

9 48 
10 66 

12 00 

13 50 
15 18 
17 08 


Add heat 
mplction ex 


ing and 
elusive 


ventilation 
of Library 


28395 40 




531272 84 








r 




1 











t 













i 












i 












i 


" 






















! 














, 










214 22 

79 11 


1 50 

4 00 


322 22 
317 63 


i 













i 












i 












6794 

1008 3-9 

1548 

2286 

1054 8 

1100483 

1022 6-9 

133 

28629 2 

16722 7 

8178 7 

3506 

780 9 

3397 2 

197 4 

70 3 

600 


27 
20 
44 
20 
55 
12 50 
3 50 
05 
48 
45 
56 
56 
79 

56 

1 24 

2 70 
35 


.1834 38 ! 
20 L 66 ] 


i 
























681 12 
457 20 
580 06 
13756 03 
3579 22 
6 65 
13742 00 
7547 66 
4580 00 
1963 36 ' 
616 79 j 
1902 41 ! 
244 69 ! 
189 67 j 
210-00 ! 





















i 












l 












i 














































































I 
















































































— — ... 














111682 23 






75969 47; 








531272 84 












1 







12 



90 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



Ni, 



345 

340 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
357 
358 
339 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 
268 
3<>9 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
379 
380 

381 

382 
383 
384 
385 
386 
387 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
395 
396 



DESCRIPTION 



Brought forward. 



mio stone 

Main face to do 

Circular plain face to Ohio stone 

-Sunk work 

5unk circular 

Chamfered 

Moulded work ,., , 

Do circular 

Do do undercut 

Carved work 

Moulded Stops 

St0p3 .«.»«„; 

Dressing and cleaning cut stone 

3 inch rubbed Ohio hearths 

3 " Ohio flagging 

3 " Nepean 'under joists 

6 ts Nepean stops 

Plain face to do 

Slate dowels 

| inch slate to urinals 

1 "do do 

6x8do do 

Circular sunk do 

Setting gnites . 

Chimney pieces, value $25 00 

Centreing 

Centreing to dome and lantern 

Boarding and con ere c 

l£ x 1£ tirrings for ceiling 

Wood lintels 

9x3 wall plates 

Framed lumber iu roof , 

Ceiliug joists, &c 

l£ roof boarding ., 

l£ do tongued and grooved 

Double 14; boarding to deck flat, upper thkkness tongued 

and grooved 

1£ rolls for lead 

2* rolls ; 

4 x 2 in quartered partitions 

4x3 do 

2x1 slate battens 

li inch pine floors, grooved and tongued as before 



12 

2 " 

li " 

6 x 3" 

1 « 

U " 

2 " 

H " 

5-8 « 

2 « 



do 



do 



ojik do 

oak sills 

attened trap to roof 

bwrought and rebatel frame 

wrought casings 

panelled ami moulded do 

dove-tailed, tongued and grooved cisterns. 

red pi:io tkirtings, moulded 11 high..., 
ouk do do do 
4-panellcd chamfered pine door 



cub. ft. 

8Up. ft. 
sup. ft. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
.do 

do 

do 
No. 
do 

sup. ft. 
do 

do 

do 

No. 

sup. ft. 

do 

lin. ft. 

sup. ft 

No. 

do 

sup. yds. 

do 
square, 
lin. ft. 
B. M. 
lin. ft. 
F. B. M. 

do 
square. 



do 
lin. ft. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
square*. 

do 
sup. ft. 

do 
lin. ft. 
sup. ft. 

do 

do 
lin. ft. 

do 
snp. ft. 



Total Quantities included in Contract. 



Quantities. Rate. Amount. 



Carried over, 



27637 10 

10131 

3172 



8515 1 

951 3 

2295 

1743 7 

3193 3 



115 

232 

392 

61 9 

27 9 

12 

9 

3 

3 

15 

1603 



69 5 

1746 

44289 

3080 9 

19636 8 



13 68 

608 

852 

32 

142 

10731 

31 56 

60 

60 

15 

10 

97 

40 

272 

749 

28 

70 



$ cts 



45 
22 
30 
35 
50 
31 
48 
31 



614 


2 


76 


466 77 


238 





20 


47 60 


16 





20 


3 20 


25 





30 


7 50 


56 





12£ 


7 00 



25 
17 
03 
18 
20 
66 

34 

1 00 
25 00 



9 80 

03 

20 30 

15 40 

2 45 



6 65 
02 
03 
03 
03 
0(4 
3 50 
5 25 
06 
08 
04 
06 
25 
10 
17 
04 
28 



$ cts. 

419626 83 

12437 02 
2228 82 
951 60 
2980 28 
475 62 
711 45 
836 92 
989 90« 



36 25 
39 44 
11 76 



11 
5 

7 
3 
3 



12 

55 

92 
06 
00 



75 00 

15 75 

1683 15 



67 
52 38 

899 06 

47 44 

481 08 



90 97 
12 16 
25 56 

96 

4 26 
53 65 

110 46 
3 15 
3 60 

1 20 

64 

5 82 
10 00 
27 20 

127 33 

1 12 
19 60 

445640 82 



91 



DULE D. 



of Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 



Contract Work Executed. 




ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Ventrn. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


J Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts 


111682 21 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

75949 47 

37292 71 

3920 64 

2095 45 

6209 33 

1590 83 

892 46 

1974 04 

3156 62 

470 80 

217T 00 

119 00 

18 00 

300 00 

12 50 

11 20 

45 84 
39 15 

46 40 
23 52 
16 66 

8 32 

12 00 
4 50 
6 00 

90 00 

169 80 

4007 50 

64 32 

32 16 

1 24 

87 30 

1109 38 

50 




$ cts 


$ cts 


$ cts. 

531272 04 






44396 1 

15682 7 

5987 

15523 4 

3181 8 

2878 11 

3948 1 

4208 10 

535 

1447 4 

238 

36 


84 
25 
35 
40 
50 
31 
50 
75 

88 

1 50 
50 
50 
























































































































































































25 

56 

382 

145 

232 

392 

61 9 

27 9 

12 
9 
3 
3 

125 7-9 

1603 

3216 

32 16 

69 5 

1746 

48234 

13 


50 
20 
12 
27 
20 
06 
27 
30 
.1 00 

50 
2 00 

30 00 

1 35 

2 50 
2 00 
01 

18 00 

05 

23 00 

18 00 























































































j 












j 










1 










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i- 












i 












..:::::::::c:;.; 












i 












.....::: 




. 








I .■ 




.. 








i : 




.. 




















1 














j 














i 












208 68 

13 68 
608 
964 


4 50 

8 00 
03 
07 


939 06 

109 44 
18 24 
67 48 




i 


! 












I 


! 












. I 


.:::::.z:::j 










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1 


i 


i 






1 








i 


1 









12.111 
31.56 
60 
60 

15 

16 
97 
40 

272 

749 

28 

70 


00r^ 

5 00 
9 00 
09 
10 
06 
08 
40 
Id 
20 
06 
25 


60 55 

157 SO 

5 40 

5 40 

1 50 

96 
7 76 

16 00 
40 80 

149 80 

1 OS 

17 50 


1 


i 


i 








1 




i 








! 
























































1 














i 












i 














i 
























i 


»Pf>ttft*H?tt 


>tPM""> 


11X682 23 

j 


MIIXIIPIIIHII 


HI Hlfttl 


143568 01 


< 


••••'•-j 


j 


531272 H 



02 



S C HE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



N*. 



Total Quantities included in Contract. 



DESCRIPTION 



Quantities. Rate. Amount 



Brought forward. 



397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 

403 
404 
405 
406 
407 
4.88 
409 
410 
411 
412 
413 

414 
415 
416 

417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
425 
426 
427 
428 

429 
400 
431 
432 
433 
434 
435 
436 
437 
438 
439 
440 
441 
442 
443 
444 
445 



2 inch 6 panelled chamfered pine door 

21 6 do moulded white oak, double-hung 

6x3 pine wrought, reb'd and chamfered frame 

6 x 4 white oak, do do 

6x4 do circular, do do 

2 double sashes, frames and Venetian blinds, circular 

headed, as before 

inch circular headed double starlights 

" moulded window boards 

" jamb linings, as before 

** do circular 

" chamfered architrave 

. architraves, with 2i inch bead roll 

do do circular 

CarviDg cable moulding to 1\ inch bead 

do do circular. 

\\ inch white oak seat riser and flap to W. C 

J wrought matched and chamfered pine boarding to 

ceiling 

Pine moulding to do ,, 

3 inch pine handrail, 

n. 



white oak handrail, published, including iron 

brackets 

1\- " brass butt hinges and screws 

i " do do do 

16 " T hinge3 and screws 

Turnbuckles , 

12 inch barrel bolts 

Holes cut and dished to W. C 

Beaded handle holes to do 

Shutters in pipe casings 

Doors to lavatory enclosures 

Fixing door locks 

Door locks 

Melbourne Duchess Slating, nailed with three nails to 

each slate 

Mortar under slates 

No. 24 galvanized iron hips 

Do do rallies 

Do do flashings 

Best F. C. Tin, laid complete 

3 coats plaistcring on lath hard set to ceiling 

3 do do do partitions 

3 do do do walls 

Double-faced and moulded Portland Cement, 16 ins. high 

White glazed tiles 

Cast iron 

Ornamental do 

Wrought iron in chain boud 

Do in straps and bolts 

Do in ornamental hinges and Fiuials 

Do vane, complete 

Do in stanchions, saddle bar.-,, &c, ,. 

Wary ieu over.. -.<. ■., . ,<,,,,, t ^mi < n- !>••<• 



sup. ft. 

do 
lin. ft, 

do 

do 

sup. ft. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 

do 
lin. ft. 

do 
sup ft. 

squares 

do 
lin. ft. 

do 
pairs. 
do 
do 
No. 
do 

do ■ 
do 
do 
do 

do I 
do 

squares. 

do 

sup. ft. 

do 

do 

squares. 

sup. yds. 

do 

do 
lin. ft. 
sup. ft. 

cwt. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

No. 

cwt. 



170 7 

32 

129 6 

14 

5 

837 

21 

99 

490 2 

132 
44 

465 3 

280 

133 4 
124 

66 

1990 

853 

68 

162 6 

10 

11 



20 



93 33 

93 33 

1324 5 

411 8 

1024 

3104 

134 2-9 

119 

4123J 

227 

523 

2.3.7 

18.3.1 

180.1.0 

1.1.0 

0.1.12 

1 

35.1.14 



$ cts. 



30 
60 
09 
15 
25 

85 
70 
07 
25 
37 
10 
13 
19 
05 
07 
20 

3 50 
14 

06 

26 
20 
50 
50 
10 
20 
15 
15 
25 



30 



6 70 

50 

19 

16 

16 

11 00 



$ cte. 

445640 82 

51 17 
19 20 
11 66 

2 10 

1 25 

711 45 

14 70 

6 93 

122 54 
48 84 

4 40 
60 48 
53 20 

6 66 
8 68 
13 20 

69 65 
119 42 

3 48 

42 25 

2 00 

5 50 
50 
20 
20 
60 

60 

1 00 







22 
22 





18 





20 





30 


3 


15 


b 


00 


7 


00 


12 


60 


17 


50 



6 00 



9 00 



625 31 

46 66 
251 64 

65 86 
163 84 
341 44 

29 53 

26 18 
742 20 

45 55 

156 90 

8 85 

93 79 
1261 75 

15 75 

6 25 

140 00 

318 37 

45 J368 W 



93 



DULE D. 

of Parliament Buildings. — Continued \ 





ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION 






Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Kate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
111682 23 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

143568 01 

47 76 
25 GO 

15 54 
2 SO 

1 50 

1046 25 

16 80 
8 91 

145 04 
61 05 
5 50 
93 05 
84 00 
10 66 
14 88 
19 80 

99 50 

170 60 

5 80 

65 00 

2 50 
8 25 
75 
30 
30 
80 

80 

1 60 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
531272 04 






170 7 


28 
80 
12 
20 

30 

1 25 

80 
09 
25 
37 
12£ 
20 
30 
08 
12 
30 

5 00 
20 
10 

40 

25 
75 
75 
15 
30 
20 
20 
40 














32 

129 

14 

5 

837 
21 



6 





n 
























I 


i 














i 














































99 
580 
165 

44 
465 3 
280 

133 4 
124 

66 

1990 

853 

58 

162 6 

10 

11 

1 

2 

1 
4 
4 
4 

2 
50 
20 

i 

105 65 

105 65 

2921 9 

411 8 

1339 

3104 

134 2-9 






















































































































































































































































































































40 
3 00 

9 00 
75 
20 
25 
40 
16 00 
35 


8 00 
60 00 

950 85 
79 23 
584 35 
102 91 
535 60 
496 64 
46 97 






































i 






i 












i 






































* 




































4242$ 

227 9 

523 

2.3.7 

18.3.1 


30 
30 
40 
4 50 
6 00 


1272 70 

68 32 

209 20 

12 65 

112 55 






















































j 
































181.2.0 

76.3.16 

1 

35.1.14 


14 00 
28 00 


2541 00 

2153 00 

140 00 

990 50 


























i 












1 


28 00 




























111632 23 






154887 52 








531272 04 





















94 



S CHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No- 



446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 
452 
443 
454 
455 
456 
457 

458 
459 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
406 
467 
468 
469 



470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
376 
477 
478 
479 
4S0 
481 
482 
483 
484 
485 
486 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 



DESCRIPTION. 



Brought forward. 



Wrought iron in 8 doors » 

Jast iron in do 

Galvanized iron cramps 

polled iron joists 

Twice oiling to oak floors 

1 coats oil colors 

Uleaning. staining, and twice varnishing to pine. 
Twice oiling and do to oak.. 

Finishing in Chinese blue 

Gildin.<r 



26 oz. Chance's best sheet glass 

Diapered glass, of the value of 4s. per foot, leaded up in 

strong church lead 

Lead in sheets 

Lead pipes 

Solder 



lj inch cap-welded iron piping for gas 

I % 5 *| do do , 

Patent buoy cocks 

Sets W. C. apparatus, complete 

Enamelled iron basins on enamelled iron shelves. 

Copper plugs and washers to do 

Patent cocks, with white metal taps 

Bells 

Gasfitting , , 



ewt. 

do 

do 

tons. 

sup. yds 

do 

do 

do 

do 

inches. 

sup. feet 

do 
cwt. 
do 
lbs. 
lin. feet, 
do 
No. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Total Quantities included in Contract, 



Quantities. 



Rate. 



$ cts 



137.0.0 

20.1.18 

2.1.19 



BOILER HOUSE. 

3 inch drain pipes.. , linl. yds 

3 " bends No. 

3 u junctions do 

Rubble masonry, to level of cornice of main building 



toises. 
do 
do 



do to 1st, 10 above do 

do 2nd, 10 do do 

do 3rd, 10 do do ... do 

do 4 th, 10 do do ... do 

do 5th, 10 do do ... do 

do 6th, 10 do do ... do 

do 7tb, 10 do do ... do 

do 8th, 10 do do .do 

do 9th, 10 do do ... do 

Nepean facing sup. ft. 

Pointing to do sup. yds. 

Bricks iu mortar M. 

Bricks in oil putty do 

Pointing in brick work sup. yds. 

J inch brick arches do 

3 " block limestone paving sup, ft. 

Mough concrete cub. yds 

?inc do do 

\ T ative sandstone for quoins cub. ft. 

Picked face to do sup. ft. 

Block limestone cub. ft. 



6 § 

319 4 9 

850 
20 § 

42 1-9 

11520 

1231 4 

3125 7 

118.1.19 

3.1.14 

120 

280 

240 

4 

4 

G 

6 

6 



12 60 

5 00 

10 00 



parried over. 



07 
14 
11 
11 
15 
01 
21 



00 
06 

70 



35 
25 
12} 

4 00 
17 50 

5 00 



1 50 



Amount. 



$ ete. 

451368 56 

1726 20 

102 05 

24 19 



46 

44 72 

93 50 

2 27 

6 31 

115 20 

268 58 

3125 58 
828 93 
25 98 
42 00 
70 00 
30 00 
16 00 
70 00 
30 00 



9 00 



457989 52 



95 



- -■ ■-■■*■»- — 



DULE D. 

of Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 







ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rato. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 
$ cts. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
111682 23 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

15488T 5S 

3068 80 

122 46 

38 71 

1119 39 

67 

117 25 

170 00 

4 13 

95 83 

1751 04 

369 40 

3491 21 

1657 87 

47 25 

eo oo 

84 00 
36 00 
20 00 
160 00 
45 00 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
531272 04 






137.0.0 

20.1.18 

2.1.19 

9.14.2.5 

6 I 
469 
850 
20 § 
191 6-9 
58368 
1231 4 

3173 10 

118.1.19 

3.1.14 

120 

280 

240 

4 

4 

6 

6 

6 

13 


22 40 

6 00 
16 00 

115 00 
10 
25 
20 
20 
50 
03 

30 

1 10 
14 00 
14 00 

50 
30 
15 
5 00 
40 00 

7 50 














































































































































































































































• 


























































2 00 
5 00 


12 00 

05 00 

500 00 


































.- 














Con. 

232 
9 
5 

110 39 

21 

22 4 
22 4 
22 4 
22 4 
22 4 
14 24 
14 24 
14 24 

4845 

C46 

132500 

81600 

433 

42 6-i; 

3089 

270 

187 | 

646 

969 

706 9 


pletion 

1 25 
1 00 
1 25 

7 50 

8 44 

9 48 
10 66 

12 00 

13 50 
15 18 
17 08 
19 20 
21 60 

27 

20 

12 50 

30 00 

25 

1 80 

30 

1 50 
4 00 
44 
20 
17 


of Librarj 

29 58 

9 00 

6 25 

830 41 

177 34 

209 26 

235 31 

264 88 

298 00 

335 08 

246 71 

277 33 

312 00 

1308 15 

129 20 

1656 25 

2448 00 

10S 25 

76 80 

926 70 

405 00 

749 33 

284 24 

193 80 

120 15 


168923 83 




700196 67 






























































































































































































































































































































































111682 23 












11636 92 


700196 67 


i 








! 









96 

SD HE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No. 



495 

496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 



516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 



528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
£35 



DESCRIPTION 



Brought forward. 



Plain face to do sup. 

Sunk face to do do 

Circular plain do 

Chamfered face , do 

Ohio stone cub. 

•?ui;k face to do sup. 

I inch slate louvre? do 

t x 3 pine sleepers in concrete linl. 

2j inch rolls do 



ft. 



Boarding under concrete sup. 

Centering sup. yds 

l£ inch framed dado, under windows sup. ft 

2 u battened doors do 

2h *' sashes do 

2i " do circular heads, including fastenings do 

2 H panelled and moulded doors do 

8 x 4 wrought, rebated, and chamfered framo linl. ft 

3x4 do do circular do do 

1x4 do do do do do 

18 inch T. hinges pairs. 

Locks to doors No. 



Wrought iron in girders, rivetted plate tons. 

Rolled iron joists do 

Wrought iron in bond cwt. 

do in skylight do 

German sheet glass, 20 x 12 squares 

do do 12x18. ; do' 

50 oz. chances sheet, rough .* sup. ft. 

I oils, best oil colors - sup. yds 

Cleaning, staining, and twice varnishing to pine do 

Portland cement to floor do 

Galvanized iron to flat sup. ft 

Fixing smoke pipes in ventilating shaft 



COLD AIR DUCTS AND MAIN DRAIN OUTSIDE 
BUILDING. 



Rubble masonry cub. yds 

Concrete do 

Picked face work sup. ft. 

Picked circular do do 

do do to main drain do 

2 limestone flagging 

Centering do 

Termination to N. duct of Library 



Carried orer. 



Total Quantities included in Contract. 



Quantities. 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



Amount. 



$ cts. 



97 



DULE D. 

of Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 



13 



Contract Work Executed. 




CONTRACT WORK EXECUTED. 






Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Vcnti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Kate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
11636 92 

355 50 
155 06 

17 15 
46 78 

1965 81 

429 06 

60 80 

41 14 

103 60 

7080 00 

195 75 

18 00 
6 57 

62 90 

93 60 

9 60 

16 00 

5 70 
43 68 

1 50 

6 00 

877 00 

1106 45 

33 62 

117 19 

21 60 
52 00 

22 40 
20 75 
25 60 
45 33 

886 32 
100 00 


$ cts. 
700196 67 














1422 

387 8 

49 

133 8 

2340 3 

1072 8 

202 8 

2072 

2072 

3540 

145 

60 

52 6 

213 

312 

48 

160 

38 

364 

2 

4 

T. c. qr. 

5.9.2.14 

9.12.1.20 

2.1.17 

3.3.21 

80 

416 

64 

115 

128 

60 4-9 

4924 


25 

40 
35 
35 
84 
40 
30 
02 

05 
2 00 

1 35 
30 
12i 
30 
30 
20 
10 
15 
12 

75 

1 50 

160 00 

115 00 

14 00 

45 00 

27 

12| 

35 

25 

20 

75 

18 

I 






















































































































































































































































































































































































x 
















































































■ 










328 
321| 
738 5 
870 
310 
8684 
131 


2 50 
1 50 
34 
80 
80 

09 

1 35 


25728 68 


• 


820 00 
482 50 
251 06 
696 00 
248 00 
781 56 
176 85 
200 00 






































































































































3655 97 


725925 35 





















98 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No 



635 
536 
637 
533 
549 



DESCRIPTION. 



Brought forward . 



Termination to N. duct of Legislative Assembly , 
do N. do Legislative Couucil .... 
do E. do do 
do W. do Legislative Assembly. 
do S. do from Tower 



Total Quantities included in Contract. 



Quantities. 



Rate. 



$ cts 



Total Estimate for completion, 



Amount. 



$ cts. 



Ottawa, 28th January, 1862. 



SCHEDULE D.— PARLIAMENTARY BUILDINGS, OTTAWA. 

Summary of Estimate. 



Total amount of work included in contract at Schedule 

rates 

Amount of contract work executed at Schedule rates.. 



ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 



Main building, exclusive of library 

Work for heating and ventilation to main building, 
exclusive of library 



Library above plinth.... 

Boiler-house 

Ducts outside building. 



Work prepared on ground. 

Materials on ground 

Materials at brickyard , 



Total amount required for completion of Parliament 
Buildings 



$ cts. 



457989 52 
111682 23 



502877 44 
28395 40 



27630 26 

60894 46 

5474 59 



$ cts. 



531272 84 



168923 83 

25728 68 

4755 97 



730681 32 



93999 31 



$636682 01 



99 



DULE D . 

of Parliament Buildings. — Concluded. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work for Heating and Venti'n. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

3655 97 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
500 00 


$ cts. 
725925 35 








































































4755 97 
















. 










































730,681 32 





















THOMAS GUNDRY, 
JOHN BOWES. 



SCHEDULE E.— DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS, OTTAWA. 

Summary of Contract Works and Works required to finish Eastern Block. 



Total amount of contract at Schedule rates. 
Contract work executed.. 



ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 



Main building 

Works of heating and ventilation , 



Works prepared on ground. 

Materials on ground 

Materials at brickyard 



Total amount required for completion of the eastern 
block 



$ -cts. 



185444 04 
24418 01 



43202 45 
1729 77 



$ cts. 

170489 11 
69614 39 



209862 05 



$44932 22 



$164929 83 



J. H. PATTISON. 



100 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No. 


DESCRIPTION. 


Total quantities included in 
Contract. 




Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


1 

9 


Earth excavation in basement, drains, ducts, found- 
Rock to do do do 


9977 22 


$ cts. 
21 


$ cts. 
2099 52 


3 


Rock down slope of bank, and from thence to water's 
edge for sewer , do 








4 








80 00 


5 




860 
521 
108 


19 


8 


20 

40 

1 00 


172 14 


6 


Removing rubbish during progress, and at completion 


208 04 


7 




108 66 


8 






9 


24 it ch glazed-ware pipe, connection from ventiduct to 

18 inch do sewer, down slope of bank do 








10 








11 


12 inch do for drains... do 


500 





42 


210 66 


1? 






13 


9 inch glazed-ware pipes, for foul air flues in roofs linl. feet. 

9 inch bonds for do do each. 








14 








lit 








16 


500 
No. 2i 




1 


23 
25 


115 00 


17 




7 00 


18 


Brick barrel drain from pipe sewer to outfall, at rivers 

edge, 24 inch diameter, 2 rims ^ M. 




19 


Brickwork for ventiduct in attics do 








20 


do in external walls and chiinnies do 


854629 

1036180 

31420 







7 00 
6 30 
6 65 


5982 40 


?A 




7157 93 


?,?, 


do in groined arches do 


208 94 


23 






U 


86600 
46095 






38 00 
20 00 


3290 80 


25 

26 




921 90 


27 

?8 


do for circular smoke shaft, within extracting shaft, a 


1171 





25 


292 75 


29 








30 
31 


3528 
2416 
5193 


2 

9 

15 


1 58 

1 75 

2 53 


5574 35 
4229 31 


32 
33 


Rubble masonry to complete ground to first floor do 


13138 77 


34 


do dp first floor to eaves line ... do 
do do' in towers, to 10 ft. above do do 
do do do 20 ft. do do 
do do do 30 ft. do do 
do do do 40 ft. do do 
do do do 50 ft. do do 
do do do 60 ft. do do 
do do do 70 ft. do do 








35 


1 




36 






37 






38 








39 








40 








41 








4?, 








43 
44 

45 




308 
51 


6 



2 45 
2 60 


75,5 14 
132 (0 
















44685 91 















101 



DULE E. 

of the Departmental Buildings, Eastern Block. 



Contract Works Completed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and additional Work. 


Works of Heating and Ven- 
tilation. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




9997 22 


$ ets. 
21 


$ cts. 
2099 52 


966 9 


$ cts. 
25 


$ cts. 
241 58 


2118 
319 21 


$ cts. 

25 

1 25 


$ cts. 

529 50 
399 63 


$ cts. 








1240 


1 25 


1550 00 










1620 


25 


405 00 




860 19 


20 


172 14 


644 
844 22 
131 21 


25 

35 

1 00 


161 00 
'297 68 
131 82 






















































88 


6 00 


528 00 










124 


3 25 


404 00 




2 6 


42 


1 05 










675 

No. 27 


52 

1 04 


351 00 

28 08 






























2137 
No. 134 


52 

1 04 


1111 24 
139 34 
























330 
No. 18 

74640 


42 
84 

12 50 


138 60 
15 12 

933 00 


























142000 


12 50 


1775 00 












742833 


7 00 
6 30 


5200 18 
6578 25 
















1044166 


482000 


12 50 


6025 00 
































34160 


30 00 


1024 80 


























27250 


26 00 


708 50 
























653 


25 


163 25 
























8100 
56250 


12 50 
25 00 


101 25 
1406 25 






















5469 17 

4026 23 

10928 73 














266.0 


2 75 


731 50 










2300 19 


1 75 












214 
662 
117 
180 
211 
297 
166 
135 
45 


3 25 

3 72 

4 22 

4 74 

5 33 

6 00 

6 75 

7 59 

8 54 


695.50 

2482 50 

493 74 

853 20 

124 63 

1782 00 

1120 50 

1024 65 

384 30 


















































































1" 












































392 


2 50 


980 00 










340 


1 50 


510 00 












i 


















25 


| 1 50 


37 50 






















34638 52 






21187 90 


i 


8417 51 












1 


1 





102 

SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



No 



46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 

53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 

59 

60 



61 

62 



63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 

72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 



DESCRIP TION. 



Brought forward 



Concrete bed to fire-proof floors 

Picked limestone in air ducts, plain face 

do in boiler house 

Limestone flagging to do with bouchard face 

-Hone paving to rooms in basement 

Nepean flagging to bottom of ducts 

{-inch blue stone do between air chambers, pierced to 
admit the cold air , 

Malone flagging over flues in corridors 

do to fire-proof safes 

Potsdam hearths and inner hearths 

8-inch flag-covering over boilers 

Chamfered work on do ,.. 

6-inch Malone do to gallery in main tower, worked and 
rubbed, 2 faces 

Moulded edge to landing of main tower ... 

>-inch finely jointed and rubbed blue Ohio stone floors 
to entrance halls, laid to pattern, and mixed with 
Potsdam 

Ohio stone dressings 

Labor on do, (Note. — In contract, the labour in all 
cases includes the stones, but in finished measure- 
ment is entered separately.) plain face 



cube feel 
sup. feet 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Do do 

Do do 

Do do 

Do do 

Do do 

Do do 

Rubbed face to do., 

Carving to do., 

Blue Ohio stone in 



sunk do 

chamfer do 

moulded do , 

circular sunk 

do chamfer. 

do moulded. 



entrance steps and staircases 



feet lin. 



feet super 
cube feet. 



feet super, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



inside the building. 
Labour on do, as before described, plain face. 



Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Rubbed face on 
Carving to 
Brockville 
Labour on 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do. 

do. 



sunk do 

chamfer do 

moulded do 

circular sunk do.... 
do chamfer do 
do moulded do 



stone 

do, plain face 

Do do sunk do , 

Do do chamfer do 

Do do circular sunk , 

Do do do chamfer. 

Brought forward 



cubic feet, 
feet super. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

cube feet, 
feet super. 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Total quantities included in 
Contract. 



Quantities. 



$ cts. 



1174 4 



5896 2 



337 7 
940 4 



391 
62 



27794 5 
6514 11 

10129 
7968 6 
4629 11 
4292 5 
4361 3 



1855 

183 1 

1299 5 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



2 60 



25 



35 
35 



1 20 
50 



42 
48 
50 
55 
52 
54 
62 



42 
48 
50 



Amount. 



$ cts. 
44685 91 



3052 67 



1474 04 



116 .76 
329 12 



469 20 
31 00 



11673 87 

3127 16 

5064 50 

4382 67 

2406 52 

2317 90 

2703 97 



1881 60 



779 10 

87 84 

549 70 



85233 55 



103 



DULE E. 

of the Departmental Buildings, Eastern Block. — Continued. 



Contract Works Completed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and Additional Work. 


Works of Heating and 
Ventilation. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
34638 52 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
21187 90 
7808 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
8417 51 


$ cts. 






1952 00 


4 00 














2476 6 
227 
751 6 


34 
8a 
27 


842 01 
181 60 
202 91 






































6236 6 


30 


1870 95 










1429 
344 


15 
40 


214 35 

1377 60 
























290 

366 

1139 


50 
50 
45 


145 
183 
512 55 






































303 4 
26 3 


50 
40 


151 66 
10 50 
























391 

62 

90 

37 6 

1990 

• 37 6 

11550 1 
2578 
7423 1 
5581 
1180 1 
2538 3 
1338 2 
1823 5 


1 50 
60 

80 
84 

25 
40 
31 
50 
50 
50 
75 
08 


586 50 
37 20 

1592 00 
19519 50 

2887 52 
1031 20 
2301 15 
2790 50 
5590 04 
1269 12 
1003 62 
J 45 88 
1520 00 

2301 60 

1366 05 

359 28 

420 69 

576 75 

2 10 

1 80 

29 25 

409 66 

45 00 


































42 

48 
50 
55 
52 


6701 60 
1805 04 
1662 79 
2287 86 
1217 45 
1210 19 
1329 07 


7778 

670 7 

1172 3 

1084 

899 

128 8 

16 


84 

25 
40 
31 
50 
50 
50 


o5oo ol 

167 65 
468 90 
336 04 
449 50 
64 33 
8 00 




15956 




3760 6 




3325 7 




4159 9 




2341 3 




2241 1 




2143 8 








12 1 


08 


97 
160 00 

43 68 
18 15 








630 46 


2740 
4553 6 

748 6 
1137 

961 3 
3 6 


84 
30 
48 
37 
60 
60 


52 
60 6 


84 
30 










3 
32 6 

4098 8 


60 
90 
10 


156 9 
145 

7 7 
57 4 
20 
15 


66 
33 
53 
40 
80 
80 


103 45 
47 85 
4 02 
22 93 
16 00 
12 00 




751 4 

197 

104 2 

46 4 

1 8 


42 
48 
50 
52 
54 


315 56 

94 56 

52 08 

24 01 

90 















































51939 99 




72494 01 






19855 13 




, 















104 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work for the completion 



No. 



87 
88 
89 

90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 

100 
101 
102 
103 
10X 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 

114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 

129 
130 
131 
132 
128 



DESCRIPTION. 



Brought forward 



Cradled face on Ohio stone, plain feet super 

Do do chamfer do 

Potsdam outer arches over window heads in building — 

in contract, mixed sandstone , do 

Nepean stone facing do 

Painting do in black putty do 

Plain stone chimney pieces in basement each. 

Arnpricr marble do second class do 

Do do first do do 

Nepean stone steps to areas and boiler house cube feet. 

Bouchard face to do feet super. 

Rough bouchard steps in lime stone, including stone... do 

Fine do do do 

Vermont slating to roofs (in finished measurement a 

layer of felt is included) $ square 

Cutting to hips and vallies feetlin. 

Lath plaister, float and set yds. super 

Render, float and set do 

Plaster moulded cornices, plain feet super. 

Do do with one enrichment do 

Lime whiting basement walls yds. super 

Portland cement floors in entrance halls and basement do 

18-inch Keene's or Martin's cement skirtings feet lin. 

12 do do do do do 

6 do do do do do 

Cemented arris's to chimney jambs do 

Do facings to staircase arches, plain feet super 

Do do do moulded do 

Plain do to floors of Record Rooms and to 

walls and floors of water-closets yds. super 

Centreing to arches, lathed feet super 

Do do ribbed feetlin. 

Centreing for groining of main tower ft. super. 

do do for ventiduct do 

Bracketting for cornices do 

Pine flooring joists, B. M per M. 

Bond timbers and wall plates do 

Framed timbers in rafters, purlins, Ac do 

Herring bone strutting per 100 ft. lineal 

Pugging to floors, 3 inches thick, including boarding..per square 

3 inch elm floor for gallery in boiler house do 

1£ inch boarding to slopes (in contract) do 

l\ inch grooved and tongued boarding to decks, and 

in execution to slopes do 

2 inch second quality grooved and tongued flooring... do 

2\ inch first quality do do do 

U inch second quality do do do 

Rafters to boiler house, wrought and framed ft. lineal. 

Casings and jamb linings to basement doors do 



Total quantities included in 
Contract. 



Quantities. 



Carried forward 



1691 2 



No. 15 
do 55 
do 25 



652 7 
1168 9 

364 29 



6502 7 

16355 1 

11656 4 

5326 8 

691 6 

1493 3 



7029 10 

2232 

3037 6 

492 

212 



2783 
2560 
1004 



6983 
40.043 
16.916 
176.771 
2104 
187 56 



360 2 

123 25 
242 65 

442 75 



588 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



55 



12 00 
26 00 
38 00 



35 
38 

6 65 



21 
18 
14 
18 
03 
50 



16 
10 
03 
20 
30 



07 
07 
07 



10 
16 00 
16 00 
19 00 



Q0 

75 



1 65 

2 45 

4 55 

5 90 



35 



Amount. 



$ cts. 
85233 55 



930 14 



180 00 

1430 00 

950 00 



228 28 
444 12 

2422 53 



1365 54 
2943 92 
1631 87 

958 68 
20 74 

746 62 



1124 76 

223 20 

91 13 

98 40 

63 60 



194 81 
179 20 

70 28 



698 30 
736 68 
270 65 
3268 64 
147 28 
328 23 



594 04 

301 96 
1104 06 
2612 22 



205 80 



111800 13 



105 



"Vi' 



DULE E. 

of the Departmental Buildings, Eastern Block. — {Continued.) 



Contract Works Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and additional Work. 


Works of Heating and Venti- 
lation. 


Tot&L 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
51969 99 

225 16 

687 00 

813 08 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
72494 01 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
19855 13 


$ Otff. 






























i 


1478 4 


55 


30 
6987 6 
5654 
No 16 
do 41 
do 41 
201 
674 


55 

27 

20 

15 00 

40 00 

50 00 

66 

33 


16 50 

1886 63 

1130 80 

240 00 

1640 00 

2050 00 

132 66 

222 42 






1 


















205 


20 


41 00 














































84 
118 


66 
33 


55 44 
38 94 








































12 65 


66 


84 12 


410 
1560 


11 75 
20 00 


4917 50 
312 00 








































22969 

12558 

7978 

755 

1890 

8513 

809 6 

3768 9 

3327 u 

2790 4 

1797 9 

449 
200 


20 
20 
25 
03 
75 
35 
25 
15 
05 
50 

60 

1 00 
15 


4593 80 

2511 60 

1994 50 

22 65 

1417 50 

2979 35 

202 38 

565 32 

166 36 

1395 12 

1078 65 

449 00 
30 00 












































316 ' 


03 


9 48 
























i ' 


















































































2438 4 


07 
02 


170 67 
277 86 










2315 6 












0104 


1 25 


1225 00 














3924 


15 


588 60 


i 


































75S9 


16 00 
19 00 


121 43 
2875 13 












1 


151.323 


35.318 


23 00 


812 31 


4098 


33 00 


94 25 | 


































3* 


10 00 


35 00 








461 22 
258 22 














08 

15 25 

448 75 

101 


4 50 

5 50 

6 50 
4 00 


441 00 

83 87 

2916 87 

404 00 


20 50 


4 50 


92 25 






























20-t 














10 


20 40 










836 


35 


292 60 


















| 57943 88 





108524 60 






20830 49 














1 







14 



106 



SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for completion 



as 



No. 



133 

134 
135 
136 
137 

138 

139 



140 

141 

142 
143 
144 

145 
146 
147 

148 

149 

150 
151 
152 
153 
154 

155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
361 
162 
163 

164 

165 
166 



DESCRIPTION. 



Brought forward. 



Total Quantities included in 
Contract. 



Quantities. 



do 

do 

do 
do 

ft. lineal. 



Vindow seats in basement ft super. 

fattening walls in do ft. square. 

do roofs under slates do 

>Lidge and hip rolls, including irons per ft. lin'l. 

tolls on decks for galvanized iron covering do 

1 inch framed ledged outside doors in basement, in- 
cluding frames and ironmongery ft. super. 

> inch do to principal entrances, including 6 a 6 
inch frames, wrought iron ornamental hinges and 
fastenings complete 

I inch four panelled doors to inner walls of basement 
and to water closets, including ironmongery 

:i inch inside six panelled doors, including iron- 
mongery 

I inch framed jamb linings to do 

Vrehitrave mouldings to doors and windows.. 

I inch casement sashes and frames in basement, includ- 
ing ironmongery ft. super. 

Borrowed lights for dark closets . do 

Framed linings backs and elbows tor windows do 

1 inch grooved, tongued and beaded partitions to 
water closets 

2J inch moulded sashes, bung to proper cased boxings, 
with all necessary lines, weights, and ironmongery, 
complete 

2 inch winter sashes to do hung to similar boxings, 
with ironmongery and finishings as last described... 

Sashes and frames to lantern lights, including cills 

Moulded eaves' cornices to do ft. lineal. 

Water closet seats and risers in pine each. 

do do in hardwood do 

Assisting plumber to fit up do and casing supply and 

service pipes do" 

Casing pipes in roofs allowed. 

Small feed cisterns for W. C's each. 

Closets under urinals and lavatories do 

Step ladders to roofs and t< wers, including hand-rails., per step. 

Fence-rail, with standards in attics ft. lineal. 

Fitting up one room for telegraph office allowed. 

Oak hand-rail for the several stone stair-cases ft. lineal. 

10 m 10 inch Newell's for do each. 

do for " Governor General's entrance," with 

extra finish , 

Milled lead laid to cisterns, hips, vallies, flats, and 

ridges per cwt 

Wiped solder joints to do ft. lineal. 

Galvanized sheet iron covering to flats of roofs, on 

proper rolls , per square 

Carried over 



do 



do 

do 
do 



182 



2060 



118 9 

292 6 

1088 

3597 4 

2H63 

9112 5 

519 1 

125 

5520 6 

919 

8612 5 

7121 4 



No. 7. 
No. 20. 

No. 27. 



No. 4. 
No. 16. 
No. 115. 
837 6 



Kate. 



234 10 
No. 3. 

No. 1, 

603.0.23 
450 



$ cts, 



07 



05 



Amount. 


$ eU. 


111800 13 


12 74 



40 

1 00 

30 

35 
20 
16 

25 
25 
18 

03 

35 
35 



4 00 
9 00 

4 00 



3 00 

4 00 
40 
20 



80 
8 00 



7 00 
60 



103 00 



47 50 

292 66 

326 40 

1259 04 

572 60 

1457 96 

129 77 

31 25 

993 69 

73 52 

3014 35 
2492 47 



28 00 
180 00 

108 00 
65 00 
12 00 
64 00 
46 00 

167 50 
85 06 

187 86 
24 06 

12 06 

4222 44 
225 00 



107 



DULE E. 

of the Departmental Buildings, Eastern Block. — (Continued.) 



Contract Works Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and Additional Work. 


Works of Heating and Venti- 
lation. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Kate. 
$ cts. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 
57943 88 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

108524 60 

24 84 
148 50 
400 00 
151 13 
492 00 

59 37 

441*25 

472 15 

1694 70 
1172 72 
1882 20 

352 00 

18 00 

1394 80 

113 25 

4381 00 

2938 20 

144 00 

21 00 

35 00 

462 50 

112 00 

75 00 

Ifi 00 

80 00 

57 50 

226 50 

100 00 

285 00 

40 00 

14 00 

9506 00 
270 00 

2702 50 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
20830 49 


$ cts. 






276 

66 

400 

2159 

16400 

118 9 

353 

1349 

3766 
4224 
9411 

880 

60 

6340 

1050 

1 8762 

7345 6 
144 
42 
No. 7. 
No. 21. 

No. 28. 


09 
2 25 

1 00 
07 
03 

50 

1 25 
35 

45 

28 
20 

40 
30 
22 

9 12* 

50 

40 

1 00 
50 
5 00 

12 05 

4 00 




































i 
































133 9 


50 


66 87 




















, 






















I 












1 


























,, 








































































182 50 
55 50 


91 00 
27 50 






































! 












... ..< 












No. 4. 
No. 16. 
No. 115. 
906 


4 00 

5 00 
50 
25 














1 












i 












"* i 




















■ 






285 
No. 4. 

No. 1. 

679 
450 00 

150 14 


1 00 
10 00 










































15 SI 


14 00 
60 

18 00 


14 1 


14 00 


199 50 




i 








18 00 


18 00 


324 00 




| > 




L. 


57959 29 






138637 71 






21539 36 



















108 

SCHE 
DETAILS of Work required for the completion 



Ho. 



DESCRIPTION 



167 
163 

169 

170 
171 
172 
373 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
379 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 

187 
188 
189 

190 

m 

192 

l«3 

194 

iy5 

li>6 
197 
198 

199 
200 
201 
220 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 



Brought forward. 



Total Quantities included in 
Contract. 



Quantities. 



Lead supply and service pipes throughout the build- 
ing per cwt. 

Water closet apparatus, including basins and taps, sunk 
handles, 3 ft. of 4j inch soil pipe, cranks, wires, 

pullies, and all necessary fittings complete each. 

Screw washers to I5 inch lead pipas from urinals and 

lavatories do 

Plated taps, plugs, washers and chains for wash basins.. do 

I inch stop-cocks to urinals do 

1J ball cocks and copper balls for water-tanks do 

1 inch do and do for feed cisterns do 

3 inch brass hydrants do 

2 inch brass cot k* for do do 

Rolled iron joists for attics and other floors per ton. 

Oast iron saddles for boiler house trusses per lb. 

Shoes for trusses over agricultural Wing do 

6 inch cast iron soil pipe per cwt. 

3 inch v»aste pipe from tanks do 

Cast iron shelving for record rooms and safes do 

do eaves' gutters fixed complete do 

do downri.hts do do 

do enamelled urinals do 

do do washing troughs and basins do 

Wrought iron doors and frames to record rooms and 

fire proof safes each and per lb 

Wrought iron shutters to record rooms do 

Ornamental wrought iron cresting ..per ft. and per lb 

Large handsome do to main tower deck, made to 

drawing per lb. 

1 cast iron spiral staircase per cwt. 

Sundry wrought iron terminals to roofs per lb. 

Do do toN. W. and E. towers do 

Do do to main tower do 

Do do to entrance steps do 

Wrought iron racing and baluster to basement steps... do 

Do do do to areas do 

Cist iron area gratings ... per cwt. 

Ornamental wrought iron rail and balusters to gallery 

in main tower , feet lin. 



Do 



do 



bracket? fordo each. 



Valvular registers in basemei ts do 

Do to upper rooms do 

Register stove grates do 

Stove pipe riugs with flanges do 

Bell traps for areas do 

Sheet ix'on covering to folding doors of boiler house... <j$ft sup'r, 

bells to rooms each. 

Do to entrance doors do 



88.3.4 



No. 27. 

No. 16. 
No. 16. 
No. 8. 
No. 2. 
No. 4. 
No. 3. 
No. 3. 



Rate. 



19 
20 
66 







24 

359 
103 20 
No. 8. 
No. 8. 

No. 10. 
1460 
1335 ft. 



92 00 



2214 
7154 



63 
No. 16 



No 106 
" 101 



Carried oyer. 



$ cts 



7 00 



35 00 



Amount. 



3 10 
3 50 

12 00 

8 00 



200 00 
20 
3 10 



$ cts. 
128.032.82 

621 50 



945 00 

36 00 
96 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
19 50 
12 00 



3 10 



12 
12 



10 00 
15 00 



8 10 
26 00 



60 45 

71 75 

234 37 

1256 50 

361 06 

96 00 

64 00 

2000 00 
292 00 

4138 50 



285 20 



750 00 



265 68 
858 48 



630 00 
240 00 



858 60 
2626 00 



144887 41 



109 



DULE E. 

of Departmental Buildings, Eastern Block. — Continued. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and Additional Work. 


Works of Heating and Venti- 
lation. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts 


$ cts. 
57959 29 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
138637 71 

1394 00 

1120 00 

55 00 
84 00 
14 00 

12 00 
16 00 
24 00 

13 50 
16739 94 




$ cts. 


$ cts 
21529 36 


$ cts. 






99 2 5 

No. 28. 

No. 22. 
No. 14. 
No. 7. 
No. 2. 
No. 4. 
No. 3. 
No. 3. 
145 11 1 5 


14 00 

40 00 

2 50 
6 00 
2 00 
6 00 
4 00 
8 00 
4 00 
115 00 



























































































































* 






1308 lbs. 


04 


52 32 










1 cwt. 
20 3 18 
20 2 10 

142 


4 50 


4 50 

94 10 

92 65 

639 00 
























i ] 












! 








































No. 7. 
No. 7. 

5700 

1600 

11392 lbs. 

1440 

92 

6600 

800 o 

12H0 

1500 

1710 

8800 

24.2.0 

63 
16 
No. 46 
" 96 
" 98 
" 19 
" 7 


14 40 
9 60 

20 
20 
25 

25 
4 50 
25 
25 
25 
25 
12£ 
12* 
4 50 

12 00 
18 00 
2 50 
8 10 
26 00 
50 
2 00 


100 80 
67 20 

1150 00 

320 90 

2848 00 

360 00 
414 00 
1650 00 
200 00 
300 00 
375 00 
213 75 
. 1100 00 
110 25 

756 00 

288 00 

115 00 

777 60 

2728 00 

9 50 

14 00 
























































42 6 


3 00 


127 60 




































































































































































































































55 


50 


27 50 










do 98 
do 5 


5 00 
10 00 


490 00 
50 00 




































57959 29 






173377 50 






2174S 68 



















■i/ ,hi 'f,:; 1 !. r-r 



110 

S CHE 
DETAILS of Work required for the completion 



No. 



208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 

115 

216 
217 
218 
219 

220 
221 
222 
223 

224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 



DESCRIPTION 



Brought forward. 



Iron tubing for gas service feetlin. . 

British sheet glass for windows feet super 



German do 
Obscure do 
Coloured do 
Rolled sheet do 



do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 



Wrought iron woik to gallery in boiler house, and to 

roofs of same ^ lb. 

Wrought iron ornamental balustrades for principal 

staircases ^ ft. lin. 

Hoop iron band to outside walls *$> lb. 

Wrought iron in roof, straps, bolts, chimney bars, Ac. do 

Do in cramps for cut stonework TgJ cwt. 

Wrought iron cramps for limestone facing and brick 

lining of outside walls per cwt. 

Felt, tar, and gravel covering to decks per square. 

Four coats painting in plain colours per yard. 

Graining and varnishing, add to the above do 

Fainting, cresting, and terminals picked in colours, 

add to plain work do 

Staining and varnishing, two coats do 

Rolled iron joists per ton. 

2-inch filleting for fire-proof floors per square. 

Ceiling joists for do do 

Flooring fillets do 

Fencing grounds and building office for Clerk of Works 

Allow for rubble masonry, cut stone work, and air 

gratings for mouth of air ducts 



Totals. 



Total Quantities included in 
Contract. 



Quantities. 



3982 8 

3474 

194 2 

986 9 



234 10 
8700 
7856 
12.0. 

140.0.0 

123 

5170 

1076 

924 
4650 
139.17.0.25 
442 75 
422 75 
422 78 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



35 
14 
50 
70 



1 75 
05 
12 
9 00 

7.00 
5 25 
09 
28 

25 
09 
115 00 
60 
60 
60 



Amount. 



$ cts. 

144887 41 



1393 93 

486 36 

97 08 

690 73 



411 06 
435 00 
942 72 
108 00 

980 00 
645 75 
465 30 
301 28 

231 00 
418 50 
16984 04 
253 65 
253 65 
253 65 
250 00 



170,489 11 



Ill 



DULE E. 

of the Departmental Buildings, Eastern Block. — Concluded. 



1 ■ ' 


cecuted. 




TCSTTM ATP! TTOR (mMPlYRTTOW 






Contract Work E: 








Contract & Additional Work 


Contract of Heating and 
Ventilation. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Kate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amouut. 






$ cts. 


$ cts. 
57959 29 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

173377 50 

750 00 

2000 00 

720 00 

193 20 

1849 50 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
21746 68 


$ cts. 






5000 
4000 
3600 
322 
1233 


15 

H 50 

20 

60 

1 50 




























288 


20 


57 60 
































108 
8904 


60 
15 


64 80 
1335 60 
























285 

3592 

336 


8 00 


2280 00 
449.00 
30 24 




5596 


12 


671 52 












09 


112 


09 


10 08 










■ 








6265 

1669 

966 

5806 


25 
35 
50 

6 20 


1566 25 
584 15 
483 00 

1161 30 


13 


25 


3 25 ! 








i 












i 










i 
i 

i 












i 


95.10.0 21 




10983 48 






| 






i 










! 






i 
i „ 


















i 












| 






i 










i 






t 










i 






"1 

1200 e i 

















i 




69,614 29 




185,444 04 






24,418 01 1 209.862 05 




■ 








i 



ADOLPHE LEVfiQUE. 
J. H. PATTISON. 



112 



SCHE 

Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block — Summary 



No. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Total Quantities included 
in Contract. 



Quantities. Rate 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

y 

10 

n 

12 

13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 



Earth excavation in building, drain and foundations... 



Rock 

Earth 

Roch 

Earth 

Rock 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



cold air ducts 

do 

do 

do 
from areas 

do 



Earth filling and draining over pipes 

do under coM air inside building } 

do outside building over ducts v 

do in trenches ) 

Removing rubbish during prog, el and at completion 

of works 

Earth excavation to drains 

Substratum of hard, dry rubbish under basement floor.. 

Allow for temporary drainage 

12 inch glazed stoneware drain-pipes 

9 inch do do 

6 inch do do 

do do do 

do do junctions and bends.. ... ,. 

6 inch cast iron bree traps 

Rubble maponry, cold air ducts 

Picked face on do 

8 inch limestone flagging to do for covering 

Nepcan stone do to bottoms of do 

Rubble masonry under steps to boiler house and foun- 
dation of boilers 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do do 

first floor to eaves' line . 
in towers, 10 feet above 



do 



do 
do 
do 

do 



20 
30 
40 
50 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Nepean stone facing 

Potsdam heartns and back hearths.., 

15 inch glazed stoneware drain-pipe 

|Bends and junctions 

Rubble masonry in foundation 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Chisseled face 

eluded 

Sunk face on do do 



above in internal walls 

do do 

random coursed external walls .... 

groined to first floor 

do to internal walls 

do in safes 

on sand stone dressings, stone 



m- 



do 
Carried over 



ft. super, 
do 



480811-27 



1749 9-27 



632 20-27 
300 



1892 11-27 



993 9 



3102 12-27 
321 3-27 
554 24-27 
661 20-27 

1525 18-27 

108 12-27 

30 4-27 

16.904 10 
3990 10 



$ cts 
21 



52 



20 
20 



Amount. 



1 00 
o"42 
"23 



2 53 



35 



58 
75 
75 
53 
53 
75 
75 



42 

48 



$ cts. 

1009 77 



909 67 



126 55 
60 00 



60 00 

50 00 

210 00 



115 00 



4487 79 



347 81 



4901 86 

570 69 

971 06 

1674 20 

3859 94 

189 78 

52 76 

7100 03 
1915 60 

28872 51 



113 



U L E F . 

>f Contract Works and Works Required to finish. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 


! 


. 


Contract and Additional Work. 


Works of Ileatng and 
and Ventilation 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


i 


4808 11-27 


$ cts. 
21 


$ cts. 
1009 77 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts 


$ cts. 










1283 

900 

29 


25 

1 00 
25 


320 75 

900 00 

7 25 
































1749 9-27 


52 


909 67 












1667 


25 

1 00 
20 


416 75 

1067 Of, 

333 40 
















! 1067 
1667 
































! 




















1765 18-27 


25 


414 43 




632 20-27 


20 


126 55 












839 
200 
173 


25 

25 

1 00 


1 

209 75 

50 00 

173 00 


! 


| 


































" 


















200 


52 


104 00 
















2706 


50 


1353 00 




48 


23 


11 04 


124 

1800 
No. 30. 
No. 15. 


42 

42 

1 25 
1 00 


52 08 

756 00 

37 50 

15 00 

















































218 
2925 
2250 
1875 

114 
69 3-27 


2 50 
34 
35 
15 

2 50 
2 75 


545 00 
994 50 
787 50 
281 25 

285 00 
181 81 






































-.1 


































1892 11-27 


2 53 


4787 79 


563 14-27 

46 
111 9-27 

22 1-27 
125 5-27 
120 10-27 

3940 

1067 6 


3 75 

4 22 

4 74 

5 33 

6 00 
6 75 
27 
45 


2075 70 
194 12 
527 54 
117 46 
751 00 
812 50 

1033 80 
480 38 
















I 












1 












1 












I 


I 










1 










1 


54 j 00 
No. 421. ; 2 00 


54 00 

842 00 














... 












3102 17-27 
174 23-27 

554 2i-27 

66120-27 

1508 1-27 

86 1-27 

30 4-27 

10637 9 
2652 


1 58 
1 75 

1 75 

2 53 
2 53 

1 75 

1 75 1 

42 
48 


4t0l 86 

306 00 

971 06 

1674 20 

3S15 34 

150 57 

52 76 

4467 84 
1225 12 
































































































































. 




24409 57 






0236 98 






(3993 49 






I 













15 



MM 1 «i 



114 

S CHE 

Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block — Summary 



No. 



47 

48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 



60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
76 

76 

77 

78 
79 

80 
81 

82 

83 

84 



DESCRIPTION. 



Total Quantities included 
in Contract. 



Quantities. 



Brought forward. 



Chamfered face on sandstone dressings, etono in- 
eluded 

Moulded do do 

Circular sunk do do 

do chamfered do do 

do moulded do do 

do face do do 

Potsdam relieving arches 

Carving to cut Ohio stone 

Hammer dressed face to angle quoins, stone included... 

Chamfered face on ditto 

Ohio stone in dressings 



Pia^n face on do 

Suck face do , , 

Chamfered face do 

Moulded do 

Circular sunk do 

do chamfered do , 

do moulded do 

Rubbing do 

Drowsing down cut stone (generally) 

Pointing in black ash mortar 

do do 

Lime whiting in basement 

do do 

Biue Ohio stone stops in principal staircases 

Plain face on do 

Sunk do on do 

Chamfer do do 

Blue Ohio stone steps to entrance doorways and to 
areas and area copings 

Plain face on do 

Blue Ohio stono stops of boiler house and steps to 
basement „ 

Plain face on do , 

3-inch blue Ohio stone flagging to air chambers, base- 
ment floor and areas 

3-inch Nepeau do to cold air ducts inside building 

4-inch blue Ohio stone to boiler house floor , 

3-inch Nopean flagging to connect flues to warm air 
vaults , 

3 inch mixed paving (half Ohio and Malone stone), 
laid in squares, to halls , 

Malone paving to safes ... 

85 j3-inoh lime stone templates under joists 

86 |Bla<k lime stono piers to carry roof of boiler house ... 

87 iPicked faco on do 

88 plough bouchard face to face of areas, steps and 
| ecpiugs (stone included) 

Carried over,,.,,. .„.„.„,". , 



ft, 
ft, 



ft. super. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do • 

do 

cuhc 

super. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
yds. sup. 

do 
foet cube, 
foet super 

do 

do 

fset cube, 
foet super 

f6ot cube, 
feet super 

do 
do 
do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
feet cube, 
foet super. 

do 



Rate. 



6378 2 
5679 1 
1781 4 
2120 10 
1599 11 
275 3 
1096 11 



907 4 

29 10 



30? 



502 

2361 

165 



3263 



1324 
507 9 

2262 4 



2961 6 



$ ets 



50 
55 

52 
54 
62 
52 
55 



Amount. 



42 
25 



03 



45 
42 
48 



6 25 



25 
25 
04 



35 



$ ets 
28872 51 



3189 08 

3123 50 
926 29 

1145 25 
991 95 
143 14 
603 30 

1179 25 

381 08 

7 46 



9 24 



225 90 

991 62 

79 20 



815 75 



331 00 

126 94 

90 49 



1036 53 



44199 U 



115 



DULE F. 

of Contract Works and Works required to finish. — Continued. 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work* of Heating and 
Ventilation. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts. 


$ cts 
24409 57 

1682 58 
1833 38 
435 52 
934 25 
839 32 
143 13 
577 64 
814 10 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
9236 98 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
6993 49 


$ cts. 


8365 2 


50 

55 
52 
54 
62 
52 
55 












3333 5 






! 










837 8 
















1730 1 
















1353 9 
















275 3 
















1050 3 

























445 00 






104 00 










































11446 6 fi 84. 


9615 06 

2141 45 

507 20 

1688 19 

2323 60 

187 85 

3 6 2 90 


8336 6 
480 5 

1177 10 

751 4 

570 

123 8 

12 8 


84 i 7002 66 
25 1 120 10 
40 471 13 
31 232 91 










7138 2 

1056 7 

4292 5 

3872 8 

313 1 

S57 

251 2 

1104 9 


30 
48 
37 
60 
60 
60 


























50 
60 
50 


378 50 

61 83 

6 49 


























90 | 226 90 
io i no 4ft 


























824 00 
«7'2 60 
















4184 


15 


58 
13 6 


15 
15 


8 70 
17 40 




















154 


04 


6 16 










1200 


04 


48 00 










502 

1541 

182 

751 

1283 2 
3569 

150 


84 
30 
48 
37 

84 
30 

fM 


421 6S 
462 30 

87 36 

277 87 

1077 86 
1070 70 

126 00 
201 15 

1569 00 
















































































204 
562 

3332 
3124 
1104 

S50 


84 
25 

20 
27 
27 

15 


171 36 
140 50 

G66 40 
468 60 
298 08 

52 50 










670 6 1 30 
7845 | 20 






















































1324 
487 9 


80 
50 


1059 20 
243 87 








































384 
768 


25 
30 


96 00 
230 40 












































I 




1 


. 






3-1669 46 






34834 66 


1 




| 17569 05 

j 













116 



S C HE 
Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block — Summary 



No. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Total Quantities included 
in Contract. 



Broi^ght forward. 



89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

98 

67 

9* 

99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

119 

126 

121 

123 

124 

125 

126 

127 

128 

129 

130 

131 

132 

133 

134 

135 

136 

137 



Vermont slating per square 

English fire bneks in safes per M. 

Toronto pressed bricks in do do 

Common bricks in do do 

Ohio stone to door jambs of do feet cube. 

Plain face on do feet super 

Sunk face -on do do 

Lrickwork in warm air vaults per M. 



Quantities. Rate. 



Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



in circular jmoke shafts 

in do arches 

set in oil putty for setting boilers 

in internal walls 

in external walls and chimnies 

Concrete under ceuent floors cube yds. 

Do to fire proof floors do 

Do over warm air vaulis 

Brick, tar and gravel course to walls of foundations... yds. super. 
Breaking through and building in door frame in walls 

of boiler house, and making good after 

Plain chimney pieces in basement each. 

2nd class marble do to ground floor and first floor do 

1st class do do do do 

Covering or roof to portico, east entrance 

Lath plaster float and set to ceilings yds. super 

Render float and set to walls do 

Plain plaster cornice feet super 



289 

C5323 

34567 

76582 



371 
51 4 



83906 
785172 
493 16-27 
1239 5-27 



Amount. 



$ cts. 



6 05 
38 00 
20 00 

6 30 



42 
48 



6 50 

7 00 
2 45 
2 60 



Do do with one enrichment. 

Keen's Cement to walls and floors of W. C. 



Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

Do 

Do 
Do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



to skirting, 18 inches deep 

to do 12 do 

to do 6 do 

to chamfer and moulded to arches of 
staircases do 

to plain face on do do 

to arrises on do feet 1 in. 

to circular chamfer do 

Cement floor (fine concrete) yds cube. 

Battening walls per square 

Pugging 3 inches thick do 

Herringbone strutting feet lin. 

Deal tlliis to concrete floors to boiler house roof. per square 



1008 



25 



No. 14 
No. 63 
No. 13 



12 00 
24 00 
36 00 



6184 3 9 


21 


15957 3-9 


18 


8868 


14 


3012 


18 



6419 8 
2858 



Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 

-inch 



to ceiling uo 

to receive galvanized iron B. M. 

to fireproof floors per square 



to ceiling of do 

t quality flooring battens laid 

2-icch 2d do do 

li-inch roofing boards, tongued and grooved, for flats, 
la -inch do plain, do 

Carried over 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1418 



181 
2103 



16 
10 



3 00 



1 75 

7 00 



434 18 100 
434 18-100 
426 
65 75-100 
134 52-100 
276 33-100 



60 
60 



90 
55 
45 
65 



$ cts. 
44199 33 

1921 85 

2482 27 
691 34 
482 47 



155 82 
24 64 



5'-64 60 
5496 20 
1209 30 
3221 88 



252 00 



168 00 
1512 00 

468 00 

SO 00 

1298 71 

2S72 26 

1241 62 

542 69 



1027 14 
285 80 



4443 



316 75 
147 21 



260 50 
260 50 
260 00 
299 16 
£29 57 
455 94 



81470 57 



117 



DULE F. 

of Contract Works, and Works required to finish. — (Continued.) 



Contract Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Works of Henting and Ven- 
lation. 


Tota 1 .. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


' 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
31669 46 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

34834 66 

3448 62 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
17569 05 


$ cte. 






293 


11 75 










































8638 


6 30 


54 42 






i_. 

























371 


42 
48 


155 S2 
22 6S 








::*:::::::;: : 


:.. 




47 3 
























166600 

8000 

40380 

55200 

151344 


12 50 
30 00 
14 00 
30 00 
12 50 


2082 50 

240 00 

565 32 

1656 00 

1929 30 














































803906 


6 30 

7 00 


50'i4 62 
4910 56 


165767 


12 50 


2072 09 




701480 


























1764 2 1-27 


4 00 


7019 11 


53 
170 16-27 


3 00 
1 50 


159 00 
255 89 












510 


25 


127^50 

























25 10 










No. 14 
No. 57 
No. 21 


15 00 

24 00 
36 00 


210 00 

1368 00 

756 00 

100 00 

1657 25 

2981 46 

2552 37 

949 21 

460 00 

2348 85 






















































6629 25 


178_ 


21 


37 38 




i 




17533 

12761 10 

3793 10 


XT 
20 
fl fiJi 




1 




















. 








460 ' 1 00 
6711 1 35 








































224S ! 18 

i 

721 | 50 

981 ! 16 

1342 1 05 
833 60 


404 10 

360 50 
156 06 
67 10 
499 80 
6396 00 
115 31 











































































1599 
51 0i 


4 00 
2 25 







































































16 

16 

1320 


X 00 

1 00 

IS (:0 


16 00 
16 00 
23 76 












i 












i 




1 





632 

632 

418 

3 78-100 


1 00 
1 00 
6 50 
5 50 


632 00 

632 00 

2717 00 

20 74 




1 










1 












I 












131 84-100 


2 45 
1 65 


323 20 
229 20 










138 91-100 
































42557 46 






72759 13 






24573 20 




i 




, 









118 



s± A £s,: . -TLZJ- ■»'.' r »■- " ,i '■.— g « 



T , '. - ■ — -^ T 



»W»«M«ft«M* 



SCH1 
Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block — Summary 



jr*. 



DSSCRlJPTlOBT. 



188 
13V 

149 

141 

142 
143 
144 
145 

146 
144 
148 
149 

159 

151 

152 
158 
154 
155 
156 
167 
158 
169 

160 
161 

162 
168 
164 

165 
166 



167 
168 
168 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
176 



Brought forward. 



Total Quantities ioeludei 
in Contract. 



Quantities. 



dv 
ilo 

do 



2-inch groovad and tongued deal partitions for W. C. feet saper. 
3-incb outside deal door and frame (including iron- 
mongery) do 

2-inch fonr panel doors to basement and W. C, includ- 
ing ironmongery . feet super 

3-inch framed entrance doors and frame, including 

ironmongery . do 

2£-inch six panel doors, including ironmongery do 

2-inch framed j amble-wings to doors do 

Do circular do 

2-inch framed j amble-wings soffits, backs and elbows 

to windows. do 

1-ineh plain do and casings to beams „.... do 

7 moulded window and door architraves feet lin. 

Do circular do do 

Orolo casement sashes and frames in basement, includ- 
ing all ironmongery, etc., complete 

2i inch moulded sashes, hung to proper casings, with 

patent saehlines and pullies. complete 

Winter sashes and frames do do 

Borrowed light sashes do do 

2-inch .ieal window seats on proper bearer in basement. do 

Water eloset fittings in pine, complete each. 

Do do hardwood do 

Small feed cisterns to water closets do 

Pine closets under urinals do 

Do to washing trough* do 

7 H 5 oak handrail for principal staircase, including fix- 
ing iron balusters feet lin. 

10 h 10 oak newels to do each. 

Step ladders to roof, with handrail, etc., to upper 

rooms in roof, complete 

Fruce rail of pine in attics, with standards, complete 

Battens under slates per square. 

Assisting plumber fitting up water closets and casings, 

etc 

Do urinals and lavatoraries 

Mot deal frame 6 M 6 and 3 inch lodged and braced 
doors, hung folding, complete with fastenings, etc., 

to boiler house feet super. 

Centring to warm air vaults., do 

Rafters, purlins, <fec ft. B M 

Bond timbers, woodbricks, wall plates, Ac do 

Flooring joists do 

Centring , M do 

Ribbed do do 

Hips and ridgo rolls feet lin, 

Bracketing for cornices , „ feet sup. 

Fitting up telegraph office ........... 



1176 



1051 



332 
2685 4 
2373 



Rate. 



$ CM. 



08 



Amount. 

$ ets. 

S1470 67 
94 OS 



C 30 

1 00 
35 

20 



7307 ] 
1268 
8203 10 



18 
35 
16 



1081 

7063 6 
4200 



Q 25 

35 
35 



No. 6 
No. 16 
No. 4 
No. 14 

No. s : 

165 10 
No. S | 

No. 47 
786 
334 6 



3 00 
9 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 

50 
8 00 

50 
10 
50 



113441 l 

19446 J 

41542 

1892 { 

3132 

2083 J 

3308 



Carriedjover 



19 00 
16 00 
16 00 
07 
07 
03 
10 



315 30 

332 00 
939 87 
474 65 



1316 26 

443 80 

1312 61 



270 26 

2472 23 
1470 00 



18 00 
144 00 
12 00 
42 00 
24 00 

82 92 
24 00 

23 60 

78 60 
167 00 



2250 37 
311 13 
664 67 
132 44 
219 24 
62 49 
330 80 



t»5517 78 



119 



DULE F, 

of Contract Works, and Works required to finish. — (Continued.) 



Ceatraefc Work Executed. 


ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 




Contract and Additional Work. 


Work* of Heating and Ven- 
tilation. 


Total 


Quantities. 


Kate. 


Amount. 


| 
Quantities. 


Rate. Amount 

i 

i 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 






S cts.l 

| 


$ ots. 
42557 46 


i 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
72759 13 




$ cts. 


$ ots. 
24573 20 


$ cts. 




i 


1336 ! 


12* 


167 00 

io oo l 










i 


1 












■ 




1786 46 

290 6 

2384 
5261 

94 9 

7688 

881 

8787 

, 48 

991 1 

6810 7 
4842 2 
136 
592 
No. 6 
No. 16 
No. 6 
No. 14 
1 No. 8 

192 
No. 3 

No. 64 
881 


35 


625 10 
















1 
1 25 363 15 
45 j 1072 80 
28 ! 1473 08 
40 j 37 60 

22 ' 1691 36 
10 I 88 10 
20 j 1757 40 
30 14 40 












"' 

















j 













i 












* 























































40 

50 
45 

30 
09 
5 00 
12 50 
4 00 


396 40 
3405 33 


























2178 97 
40 SO 
53 28 
30 00 
200 00 
24 00 



















































































5 00 1 70 00 
4 00 40 00 

1 00 192 80 








































10 00 

50 
25 


30 00 

32 06 
220 25 





















| 












i 














I 






l * 






60 00 






' ! 













68 00 












52 


40 


50 80 




1 









3000 00 


20 i 600 00 




99927 00 


19 00 
16 00 


1898 CI 
35 62 




! 


i 




4522 00 










i 




..„ / 










1 




1892 00 


07 


132 44 
213 59 


50 

198 

2113 


15 
12 

07 


7 50 

23 76 

147 91 




| 




2127 00 















1 








* * 


1 




1 








I 





100 00 




1 








1 f 














44837 72 






87406 96 






25178 20 



















120 

8 C H E 

Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block — Summary 




176 

177 

178 

179 

180 

181 

182 

183 

184 

185 

186 

187 

188 

189 

190 

191 

192 

193 

194 

195 

196 

197 

198 

190 

200 

201 

2j2 

203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
21* 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 



Brought forward 



Timber in 'large tanks in towers ft. B M 

Cutting to hips jynd varies to slating feet lin. 

Feet tar and gravel roofs , per square 

Rolls for galvanized iron roofs foot lin. 

Roller! iron joists per ton. 

Wrought iron doors and frames to safes each. 

Do co v arm air vaults and smoke shafts per lb. 

Case iron shelvir-', in vaults cwt. 

Wrought iron 1 at tern to boiler house lbs. 

Galvanized cover.ag to roof of boiler house ..per square, 

Wrought iron saddle bars and stanchion to window lbs. 

r-inch cast iron bell traps and gratings to areas each. 

Patent hoop irou bond to w ills lbs. 

Cast iron arer gratings cwt. 

Wrought iron balusters to principal staircases feet, lbs 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



ornamental terminals to entrance steps... each. 

do cresting to roofs lbs. 

do fiuiaJs to towers .. .. do 

bars in warm air vaults do 

in straps, bolts, and chimney bars do 

cramps 

for lime stone facing do 

Registar grates each, 

Valvular registar ventilators do 

do basement do 

Cast iron eaves grtering. fixed complete cwt. 



do 



do 



lbs. 

each. 

do 




rain wat<;r pipes, do 

Wrought iron railings to areas and area steps and 

basement stairs , 

Cast iron enamell id washing troughs in water closets.. 

Do do urinals 

Do in girder to phographing room 

Do in do in octagon tower 

Milled lead in cisterns, tanks, ridges and vallies 

Wiped sollar joiuts to cisterns feet lin 

Water apparatus complete each. 

la-inch lead wash-pipe 

'-inch do supply do per cwt. 

-inch do do 

j-inch cast iron soil pipe do 

-inch do waste do from tanks do 

3-inch screw washer (brass) ea(h. 

dated taps to lavatoraries do 

i-inch stop-cocks to urinals do 

If-iucli ball-coks to balls do 

--inch do do do 

3-inch hydrants do 

2-bch brass cocks to do do 

Painting from oils yds. super, 

Carried oyer , t- 



Total Auar.titias included 
in Contract. 



Quantities. Rate. 



$ cts 



3540 



19 00 



128 
5140 
109,14.3 3 
No. 10 



50.1.22 



5 25 

03 

115 00 

210 00 



8197 



165 10 



1254 



15698 
1008 

14000 
No. 76 

No. 78 



335.3.21 
103.0 

8114 
No. 8 
No. 8 

39 1 4 

417 3 2 
236 
No. 22 



48 1 2 



22 2 5 
17 16 

No. 16 
No. 16 
No. 8 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 



4010 



3 10 



05 
1*75 
3 10 



12 

12 

07 

26 00 

8 00 



Amount. 



3 50 
3 50 

10 

8 00 
12 00 

3 10 

7 00 

50 

35 00 



7 00 



3 


10 


3 


50 


2 25 


6 


00 


1 


50 


6 


00 


•• 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 





09 



Cta. 



106 20 

95517 78 

672 00 

163 20 

12619 96 

2100 00 



156 38 



409 85 
'20021 



3887 40 
550 00 



1883 76 
120 96 
980 00 

1976 00 
689 80 



1175 78 
366 50 

811 40 
64 00 
96 00 

123 28 

2924 37 
118 00 
770 00 



337 88 



69 88 
60 00 
36 00 
96 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
15 00 
9 00 
360 90 

1:8994 & 



121 



D U L B F . 

of Contract Works, and Works required to finish. — Continued. 



ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION". 



Contruet Work Executed. 



Contract ami Additional Work. 



Quantitcs. 



Rat*. | Amount. \ Quantities. Rate. | Amount. 



Wor a of Heating and 1 <j ota 5 
Ventilation. 



Quantities, i Rate. Amount. 



$ cts.l $ ete. 
I 44837 72 



$ cts.i $ ctfl. 

j 

! 87400 90 



ota. $ ets. 
i 25175 20 !. 



3540 
1604 



30 00 , 106 20 , 

20 i 332 90 !, 



75.9.0 15 



118 00 



867 



91.0.1 17 
5750 



115 00 
20 



10467 29 
1150 00 



7.0.2 25 



115 00 809 13 



50.1 22 

18S2 



4 50 
20 



227 00 

376 40 



2240 
!so. 15 



25 j 

1 00 ] 



560 00 
15 00 



3510 
"20T"o 



20 702 00 



18 00 j 573 50 



6723 
1008 00 



31.0 X 

192 

No. 2 

10296 

1200 



4 50 

8 00 j 

25 00 

25 i 



139 S2 

1542 67 

50 00 

2574 00 

300 00 



12 S06 76 
12 j 120 96 



566 



12|! 



60 50 



No. 92 26 00 ! 2392 00 
No. 103 i 8 10 834 30 
No. 50 | 2 25 112 50 



r»20 o ' o i2|; 977 50 

No. 8 9 60 I 76 80 
No. 8! U 40 115 20 



54442 99 . 



567 27 ! 

282 1 

No. 22 j 

4937 : 

120 
1656 
69 14 
21 3 20 
No. 16 i 
No. ICy '■ 
No. 6 i 
No. 6 
No. 2 ; 
No. 3 J 
No. 3 j 
4252 I 



14 00 
6 60 ! 

40 
12* 

ml 
121 

4 50 

4 50 

3 00 
6 00 
2 00 

5 00 

4 00 
8 00 
4 30 
25 



7941. 

169 

880 

616 

15 

131 

311 

98 

48 

96 

12 

30 

8 

24 

13 

1137 



38 

20 
06 

ss 
00 

25 
07 
67 ! 

00 ; 

00 

06 
06 
66 

00 
50 
50 



630 I 12*i 78 75 



122179 19 



55 



16 



25 



13 75 
J 27221 83 



122 



S C II E 
Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block — Summary 



No. 


DESCRIPTION. 


Total Quantities included 
In Contract. 




Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 








$ cts. 


$ cts. 
128994 49 


224 

225 


Painting 3 coats, ineludiug knotting and stopping 


. yds. super. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
.. feet siiper. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


985 

985 

5990 

43 

590 

3018 

4116 

671 

239 


07 
28 
09 
15 
15 
35 
14 
70 
50 


68 95 

275 80 


226 
227 
228 
229 
230 


Staining in asphaltum 

Varnishing hand-rails, newels included 

Painting, cresting and picking in colours........ 

Glazing with British sheet glass 

Do do do 


539 10 

6 45 

88 50 

1056 30 

576 24 


231 


Do coloured do 


469 70 


232 


Do ohscure do 


119 50 


233 


Painting ballustcrs bronze 




234 


Gas piping 2 , 1$ ,% , all at 

do fittings to rooms 






235 






236 


Bells to front and entrance doors 

Do to rooms 








237 








238 


Fencing in buildings and building clerk of works offi 








239 








200 00 


















! 131'. 39 5 03 










i 



SCHEDULE F. 

Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, Western Block. 

Summary of Contract Works and Works Required to finish. 



Total amount of Contract at Schedule Rates $132,395 03 

Contract work executed 54,442 99 

ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 

Main Building 130,983 50 

Works of Heating and Ventilation 27,309 33 

$158,292 83 

Works prepared on Ground } 

Materials on Ground, > 17,523 87 

do at brickyard, ) 

Total amount requirod for Completion of Western Block 140,768 96 



128 



DULE F. 

of Contract Works, and Works required to finish.-— (Continued,) 







ESTIMATE FOR COMPLETION. 






Contract and Additional Work. 


JTorks of Heating and 
Ventilation. 


Total. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
54442 09 





$ cts. 


$ cts. 

122179 19 

309 90 
51 65 

1220 80 

6 45 

228 00 

1450 83 
609 13 

1779 75 
161 40 
100 50 
795 90 




$ cts. 


cts. 
27221 83 


$ cts. 






1033 

1033 

6104 

43 

760 

2901 8 

3045 8 

1186 6 

269 

134 

5306 

No. 183 

No. 4 

No. 107 


30 
05 
20 
15 
30 
50 

20 

1 50 
60 
75 
15 
















1 















































250 


35 


87 50 











































































5 00 ! 915 00 
10 00 40 00 










:::::::;:::{;;:;::; 












! 




5 00 


535 00 










1 












1 






. 


600 00 


























1 


54,442 99 




1 


130,983 50 






27,309 33 




' r ■ ''-«- " I 




1 







JOHN HARPER, Measurer. 

GEO. B. PELHAM, Clerk of Works. 



SCHEDULE G.— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, OTTAWA. 

Summary of Measurement of Work prepared. 





Valuation at Schedule and 
Progress Estimate Rates. 

i 


Commissioners' Valuation. 




$ cts. 

12,795 57 
9 81 




^ - 










12,785 76 
6,273 88 
1,451 46 










$20,511 10 


$27,620 26 





THOMAS GUNDEY, 
JOHN BOWES, 



124 



S CHE 
MEASUREMENT of Work prepared on 





! 




1 j 

Contract Woik. Omissions from Contract. 


No. 


1) E 8 C R 1 P I ION. 

I 














Quantities. 


Kate. 


Amount. 

i 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




• 








$ cts. 


i 

$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ CtB. 


J 


Nepean aud Brock vilie stoDe for 




















Nepean facing averaging 10 in. bed 
Potsdam stone for relieving arches. 
Large sized bond stones for tower,. 
Picked face limestone for ducts and 


«ub. ft. 
eup. ft. 
do 


2821 
3991 






50 
17 


1410 50 
67S 47 








? 








3 








4 


do 














5 














6 




1 


















cub. ft. 
sup. ft. 

do 
cub. ft. 
sup. ft. 

do 

do 
No. 

cub. ft. 
sup. ft. 
cub. ft. 
sup. ft. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
No. 
















7 
















H 
















9 














10 


Plain i'»ee to do 




11 


Sunk face to do 














12 
















13 
















14 
















15 














1(5 




1255 
475 



5 


45 

22 


564 75 

104 59 

7 40 








17 


Plain face to do 


33 8 


22 


7 41 


18 




24 
481 

27 

155 

124 



21 

24 


8 

6 


4 
7 



30 
35 
60 
31 
-18 
24 
70 
20 






19 




168 47 








20 




13 75 
48 05 
59 52 

OS 
16 40 

4 80 








21 










22 










23 










24 










2ft 




12 


20 


2 10 






© T3 




























■ 4S 






















a S 
a w 






















•— i •*-» 














26 j 
27 


Arnprior Marble, 
Circular face polished to do 


? 3 
°^ 

55 8 

a i^< 


cub. ft. 
eup. ft. 


141 

1087 


6 



1 05 
74 


148 58 
804 38 






































r 










«> © ° 




































J -£ .£> S3 j 


















.8 a g a 

1 w S o c 


i 
















: 5-H' £! ' i = l 


1 
















0<| © 


















! © © a 


















^ h fr> ci 


















1 J4 e oS Q 


















1 S^^T. 


















28 


Portage d« Fori Marble •{ * % S g 

1 'S oj ^ . 

a &J2 a 

O a.- erf © 


cub. ft. 


1585 


4 


1 40 


2149 47 








\ ss C* m w 




















2 » «a* K 




















l§ fl S •* 


















3 2 TS 


















j © 3 .£) © 


















ifiW* 


* 












2V 


Plan* free polished, ,,,,,,.,, ,.,„ 


•up. ft. 


629 


T 


53 


333 Cr< 


• »".] M« 


■••"••• 




QfirM /im^tiiirtfi 




• icm iiiiMin 


• iii.'iin 


U19 Pfi 

• 


Iff 1 t f | 1 i I It ! ' 


MMimi 


n 



125 

DULE G . 

Ground for Parliament Buildings, Ottawa. 



Additional Work. 



Heating and Ventilation. 



TOTAL. 



Quantities. Rate. 



12401 
533 
514 3 



$ cts. 



27 
55 
21 



117 

94 9 

40 2 

29 o 

20 



55 
30 
70 
55 
5U 



Amount. 



$ cts. 



3348 27 
293 15 
107 99 



Quantities. 



64 35 
28 43 
28 11 
15 95 
10 00 



2133 5 

2367 3 
454 7 



Itatc. 



Amount. 



36 

1 25 



M* 



254 1 

281 8 

33 7 

IS 

28 2 

21 7 



75 



1 60 



110 44 



8 7 
22 8 

9 7 i 75 j 
12 5 i 28 ! 



42 
( 56 
40 
62 
32 
3 08 



106 72 

157 73 

13 43 

II 16 

9 01 

23 31 



8 
2 3 



87 



.l > n »i n pi. i t . Kljmi i 



(CHiMi imt?»i< 



1 80 



42 
56 



62 



156 60 



; , . » u «.,(:» i . > : . .,;.!,■ a 1 1 « • 



« > H } I 1 1 i i » l j 
I 



UU §5 



• 1 1 1 f i «_» (i tt 



tmi;}ttttnnm\itnuKHft 



;ts. 



852 21 
568 22 



3 36 
1 26 



2 01 



im ^ 



Quantities. 


Hale. 






.$ cts. 


2821 

3991 

12401 

533 

514 

2133 






3 
5 


38 
20 
27 
55 
27 
17 i 


2367 
454 


3 

7 


17 
42 



13 73 



7 19 
3 48 



It MIH '» . . 



117 ' 

94 9 

40 2 

29 

20 

8 7 

22 8 

1411 10 

454 2 

24 8 



743 5 

311 5 

188 7 

145 3 

28 6 

43 2 

12 



1622 4 



141 6 

1087 



(i 66 
33 
53 
40 
50 
66 
33 
84 
25 
35 
40 
50 
50 
75 

31 

1 50 
50 



1 80 

2 50 



1 80 



m 7 1 50 



IHIIflM i»,>fH;i»!MM Ihill 



Amount. 



ct.«. 



1071 


98 


798 


20 


3348 


27 


293 


15 


138 


85 


362 


QS 


402 


43 


190 


93 


77 


22 


31 


27 


21 


29 


11 


60 


10 


00 


5 


66 


7 48 


1185 


94 


113 


54 


8 


63 


297 37 


155 


71 


94 


99 


108 


94 


3 


84 


64 


75 


6 


00 



254 70 
2717 50 



2920 20 



044 lit 

um h 



126 



S C H E 
MEASUREMENT of the work prepared on Ground 



No. 



Contract Work- 



Omissions from Contract. 



1) E S C R I P T I N 



Quantities. 



30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

33 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 

51 

52 

53 

54 

55 

56 
57 
58 



Brought forward. 



Plain circular 
Sunk face 
Moulded 
Do circular 

Chamfered 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



sup. 
do 

do 

do 
do 
No. 
do 



ft. 



60 
61 

62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 



I Panelled and moulded stops polis'd. 

'.Moulded stops polished 

jPlain lace rubbed sup. ft. 

Do circular do 

Sunk face do 

Moulded work do , 

Do circular 

Circular suck face rubbed 

Chamfered face do 

Plain face 

Sunk do 

Moulded do 

Chamfered 

Moulded stops 

Centering sup. yds.j 

While pine framed for roof. M. B. M.I 

(Wall plate, 9 x 3 lineal lineal ft. 

1 in deafening boards, cut to Pgths. sup. ft.j 
Basement and window frame, 

3.0x 6.6 

3 inch oak sills to do 3.0 x 1.8... 
Basement and window frame with 

oak sills, 3.0 x 6.6 No. 

Do do 3.0 x 7.6 No. 

2 inch moulded sash not glued sup 

Contractor foreman states 50 of 

above frames prepared and put 
together, and subsequently taken 
apart and altered by direction of 

the Architects 

Sets frames, 8.5 oi*4£ x 4, wrought 

and moulded No. 

Do circular, 4, 4£ x 4 do do 

3 in. oak sills, 3 x 1.8, wrought and 
weathered do 

1 " oak fillets, 3.0 x 0.3 do do 

H " Pulley stiles, 6.0 x 10£ pairs. 

Iron pullies do 

3.0 x 0.7£, 1£ wroughtpine forheada No. 
A inch wrought linings sup. ft. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
No. 



No. 
No. 



17 
116 

209 

26 

76 

4 

19 

148 
13 
22 
29 
17 
2 

14 

3 

196 





13 

1 

63627 

883 

2220 



Rate. 



$ ets 



Amount. 



1 
2 

8 
10 





7 

8 

4 

1 

2 
10 

7 

3 

4 

5 
10 


1-9 









62 



ft. 



1652 5 






1 
I 




: 






1 





o 





1 

IS 



12 



74 

74 

06 

59 

74 

53 

53 

32 

53 

53 

85 

38 

75 

54 

26 

47 

76 

47 

35 

05 

30 

03 

00 



$ cts, 
6512 90 



12 
85 
221 
42 
56 

2 
10 
47 

7 
11 
24 
23 

9, 



70 

90 

72 

40 

86 

12 

07 

54 

24 

83 

72 

67 

13 

7 88 

85 

92 28 

32 



Quantities. ! Rate. Amount. 





4 

1 

1164 



6 25 



26 49 
26 64 

387 50 



13 



do reduced from 1 do 

wrought linings do 

do - do 

parting beads lin. ft. 



do do 

1£ " moulding do 

I " beaded architraves, 3£ wide sup. ft. 
Circular rebated and headed head, 

8 inches girth lin. ft 1 

Carried forward.,, ... ,,, I 



214 81 



75 10 



09 



6 83 



8995 88 



$ cts. 



$ cte. 



9 83 



9 81 



12T 



DULE Cr . 
or Parliament Buildings, Ottawa. — Continued. 



Additional Work. 


Heating and Ventilating. 




TOTAL. 




Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Hate. 


Amount. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

4484 65 

401 27 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
1151 46 


S cts. 


$ ets. 
15051 80 


214 7 


1 87 






231 9 
116 1 

209 2 
77 6 


2 50 

2 50 

3 15 

4 12 
2 50 
.1 50 
1 50 
il 80 
1 80 

1 80 

2 45 

3 42 
2 60 
1 SO 

00 

1 00 

2 10 
1 00 

75 

1 35 
20 00 

03 
16 00 

5 00 

1 12| 

123 
87] 

19 

1 50 

55 
00 78 

1 12; 
25 
80 
12i 
40 
OS 
11 
08 
08 
01 

013 

02 

09 

19 


579 38 










290 21 














658 87 


50 10 


4 12 


209 43 








319 30 










70 10 
4 
19 
148 7 
13 8 
22 4 


192 08 














6 00 














28 50 








i 




118 87 








! 




24 00 








i 




40 20 








1 




29 1 

17 2 

2 10 


71 25 












58 71 










7 37 






i 






! 14 7 


26 25 














3 3 

190 4 

5 

10 

13 

1 1-9 

03627 

883 

2220 

02 
02 

IS 



1052 5 

50 


1 95 














196 33 














88 














1 33 














9 75 














1 50 














1272 54 












26 49 














35 52 














3(0 00 


62 


i m 

6 25 

6 874 


69 75 

112 50 
41 25 








69 75 


18 








110 25 


6 








41 25 










313 90 


50 


1 50 

55 

78 

1 121 
25 
80 
12J 
40 
08 
11 
08 
08 
01 
01$ 
02 


75 00 

14 30 
14 82 

16 88 

6 50 
18 00 

13 

7 20 
4 00 

17 74 

3 30 
12 48 

4 16 
3 12 
2 80 









75 00 


26 








20 

1 9 

15 

20 
22? 

] 
18 


14 30 


19 






14 82 


15 









16 88 


26 








50 


22£ 








18 00 


1 








13 


18 








7 20 


50 








50 
161 3 

4L 3 
150 
410 
208 
140 

75 10 

40 00 


4 00 


161 3 








17 74 


41 3 








3 30 


156 








12 48 


416 








4 16 


208 9 








3 12 


140 








2 80 










6 83 


40 


19 


7 60 








7 00 
















5526 88 






1451 46 






20679 *5 

















128 

SCHE 
MEASUREMENT of Work prepared on 



Mo. 


T) B S R I PTION. 


C 


on tract W 


>rk. 


Omissions froui Contract. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. Amount. 








?• cts. 


$ cts. 
8995. 88 




$ ets. 


* cts. 
9 8! 


75 


5 x 3 rough for do 


linl. ft, 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do I 
do ' 
do 
No. 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
supl. ft. 

No. 

do 
do 

supl. ft. 
do 

No. 
do 

BUpl. ft. 

No. 

RUpl. ft. 

linl. ft. 

do 

No. 






; 


70 








i 


. J 


77 


1£ moulding, circular 








i i 


78 


Centre mullion 


10 

9 

11 

22 

7 

6 
48 

6 
17 

2 

2 
21 
25 
13 

S 

6 

3 
S 

4 


6 
o 




3 


o 



o 












04 i 
03 : 
03 j 
03 ! 
03 
02 
03 ! 
07 
05 i 
05 
0W 
02 
04 ! 
05 
06 i 
05 
07AJ 
06 

10 


42 
27 
30 
68 
21 

12 

1 44 
(t 42 
85 
10 
u 3 
(I 42 

2 20 
(I 65 
48 
30 
23 
o 48 

40 


::::::;::::::::::::::::£.::::::::::: 


70 


:;:::: i :.l 


80 






i 


81 






82 


Bottom rail 




i 


83 


Window bars 








84 


Bottom rails, 3. long, squared... 
Stiles, 2. 5 2 x If dj 








85 








86 








87 


Stiles, 0. 8 long, 2 x If do 








88 








89 


do 2. 8 do do do 

do 3. 6 do do do 

do 4. 3 do do do 

do 2. 6 2 x 2, do 
Circular heads to frame, 2x0, 

1 inch beaded architrave 7 wide. 
1 " moulded stops 4. 3 long, 6 




1 


90 






91 




1 


92 




i 


93 




i 


94 






95 


! 




90 









97 








98 















99 


1 " springers to do, 2. 4 long, 6 














100 


Hardwood keys, 11 x 4 x \% 
2 double-headed and chamfered 

2 circular, circular do 

Basement court window frames, 
circular-headed, 4 x 3, wrought 
and ribbed with moulded water 
bar, 2. 10 x 5. 8 

2£ oak sills to do. 2. 10 x 5 

2 circular-headed sash to do 

Windows to basement of wing tow- 
ers, circular -headed, wrought, 
chamfered and rebated frames, 
4 x 3i, with 4. 1 x 2 0. with 
3 inch oak sills, 11 wide, weather- 
ed and chamfered, and h oak 
and If x 1\ piue moulded 
water bars 














101 















102 














103 


IS 





2 56 


46 08 


i 




104 






105 


224 


5 


13 

• 


29 IS 


1" 




106 








107 


2 lights each j 3. 5x1 5£ 

li do circular 






| 






108 












109 












110 


6x4 wrought, ribbed, and beaded 
door frames, for internal doors, 
4.0 x 7.2 , 


38 





1 50 


67 00 








Carried over ,. 


" ' i 








9138 14 




9 81 












1 







120 



D U L E G . 

for Parliament Buildings, Ottawa. — Continued. 



Additional Work. 



Quantities. 



G 

137 

80 



182 

122 

15 

Gi 

376 

110 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



Amount. 



07 
02 
04 



13 



21 

11.0 7 

128 

76 



09 

2G 

15 
5 10 

is 20 
00 



40 



2 50 

20 
02 
04 



$ eta, 
5526 88 

42 

2 74 

3 20 



Heating and Ventilating. 



Quantities. 



16 38 

31 72 

2 70 
6 40 

7a 20 
66 00 



7 20 



60 00 

23 02 

2 56 

3 <u 



5328 3G 



17 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



Amount. 



$ cts. 
1451 40 



TOTAL. 



1451 46 



Quantities. Rate. Amount 



6 

137 

80 

10 6 

9 2 

10 

22 6 



48 
6 



17 

2 

9 



21 

55 

13 

8 

6 

3 

8 



4 

182 

122 

IS 

64 

376 

110 



18 

18 

224 5 



24 

119 7 

128 

76 



!8 



$ cts. 



07 
02 
04 
05 
04 
04 
04 
04 
03 
04 
10* 
07A 
09 
02 
02i 
05 
07 
09 
06 
10 
08 

12 
09 

26 

15 
10 

20 
GO 



3 20 
40 
19 



2 50 

20 i 
02 
4 ! 



00 



$ cts. 
20679 75 

42 

2 74 

3 20 
53 
36 
40 
90 
28 

19 

1 92 

63 

1 27 
18 
04 
53 

2 75 
91 
72 
36 
30 
64 

48 
16 38 

31 72 

2 70 

6 40 

75 20 
6G 00 



57 GO 
7 20 

42 64 



GO 00 

23 92 

2 56 

3 04 



76 00 
21170 86 



130 



SCHE 

MEASUREMENT of Work prepared on 



No. 


DESCRIPTION 


Contract Work. 


Omissions from Contract. 




Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Amount. 


Rate. 


Amount. 








$ cts. 


$ cts. 
9138 14 

240 00 

76 01 

36 00 

21 56 
15 84 
14 70 
11 67 

10 50 

11 60 

14 00 

7 00 

3 64 
1134 60 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
9 81 


Ill 


2 in. 4 chamfered doors, double ten- 
on, to lock rail, 3.1i x 7.7, frames 
put together panels prepared No. 

L£ is. jamb linings, groovel and 


I 

1 
48 

1085 10 

12 

196 

72 

147 

58 4 

42 
46 

4 
2 

2 t 

62 


5 00 
07 

3 00 

11 
22 
10 
20 

25 

25 

3 50 
3 50 

1 82 
18 30 








112 








113 


2 in. circular beaded, 6 panel doors, 
prepared lor fixing double 

2 in. moulded architrave, 6 wide, 

2 inch do circular do do 
2 " double rebated jambs do 

PANELS PREPARED FOR 
ABOVE DOORS. 








114 


1 
1 






115 i 








116 1 








117 
1 








118 








119 


2 in. circular beaded, 4 panel doors, 
tenoned lock rails, 8.3 x 2.6 do 

Frames to external basement doors, 
6x4, circular-headed, relieved, 
and chamfered, 8.9 x 3. 10 do 

2 in. casements with fixed circular 
heads, preposed for court yard 
window, but since changed, 6 








120 








121 








122 








123 


3x4 circular-headed frames, 1£ 
puliy stiles, and moulded and 
panelled spandrels for ground 

3 in oak sills, ehsmfered, sunk and 









124 








125 


1£ in wrought and chamfered frieze, 














126 


1 i in. stuff prepared for above, 5.0 

2 in. moulded, 4 light sash, with 
double margin stylo, 5.7 x 4.2£.. do 

2in do 4 light, 5.6 x 4.2i do 

2 " do prepared, not put to- 

2 in moulded ciicular-headed sash, 
4 lights, 6.0x4.25 do 










1 




127 


60 
CO 

3 

61 

61 

4 
6 


3 05 

3 00 

2 80 

2 73 

3 00 

80 
40 


183 00 
180 00 

8 40 

166 63 

183 00 
3 20 
2 40 




1 




128 








129 








130 








131 


2 in do do with moulded 
transom, 6£ girth, 5.0 x 4.2J do 

3x4 aawn out for circular do ... do 








132 








133 








131 








135 


12 
10 10 
40 3 

32 8 


05 
09 
08 
12} 


60 
98 

3 22 

4 08 








136 








137 








138 
























10470 57 






9 81 


I 









131 



r- « r 



DULE G. 

Ground for Parliament Buildings, Ottawa. — Continued, 



Additional Work. 


Heating and Ventilating. 


TOTAL. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
582S 36 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
1451 46 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
21170 86 




• 






48 

1058 10 

12 

106 
72 

147 
58 4 

42 


5 00 
07 

3 00 

18 
36 
10 
20 

n 25 


240 00 














76 01 














36 00 














35 28 














25 92 














14 70 














11 67 














10 50 














46 25 


11 50 














4 
2 

2 

62 
62 
26 
42 

60 

60 

3 

61 

61 

4 
6 
1 

12 
10 10 

40 03 
32 8 


4 00 

5 00 

2 60 

18 30 

1 68 

2 50 

35 

4 70 
4 60 

4 50 

4 20 

4 80 

1 00 
50 
00 
T5 
09 
08 

12* 

• 


16 00 














10 00 




' 










5 20 














1134 60 


62 


1 68 

2 50 

35 


104 16 
65 00 
14 70 








104 16 


26 








65 00 


42 








14 70 










282 00 














276 00 














13 50 














256 20 

















292 80 














4 00 














3 00 














60 


1 


60 


60 








60 










98 














3 22 














4 08 
















"MlfMt •fllffft* 


.,,,,#.".. f 


601? $3 


(;,,. | ... ..l..f.f» 


• » • • f • « ! > ' f ' 


! 1451 46 

1 .; . i 

i 


yt»»v. 


I'li'iiiiiut 
I 


841*9 PP 



132 



S C H B 



MEASUREMENT of Work prepared on 



No. 



139 
140 



141 

142 
143 
144 
145 
146 

147 
148 



149 

150 
151 
152 
153 
154 

155 
156 
157 



158 
159 
160 
161 

162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 



1 

DESCRIPTION. 


Contract Work. 


Omis i ms from Contract. 


Quantities. Rate. 

! 
1 


! 

Amount. Quantities. 

1 


Rate. 


Amount. 






$ cts! 


cts. 
10470 57 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
9 81 


3x4 wrought, moulded, and cir- 
cular-headed frames, with 1£ in. 
pulley, stiles and panelled span- 
drels to wardrobe and reading 

3 in. oak sill, weathered, sunk and 
beaded, 4.0x1.7* do 


31 8 
26 


02 


ii fiO 








I 
I 9 30 ! 241 SO 
















2 in 4 light sash, 4.3*, x 3.3-]- No. 

2 " 4 do 4.4.\x 3.3£ do 


85 7 
26 
2fi 


12'i 10 70 

1 82 ! 47 32 
1 88 ! 48 88 
1 37 71 24 

i 




















2 " 4 circular do, 3.2* x 3.3£ do 








ll " wrought faced, with 4.7 qua- 
tre foils cut, 4.0 x 1.1* do 










3 oak sunk sills, morticed. 3.6 x 0.5 do 




!" ;:;;;:: 








3 x 4 moulded and circular-headed 
frames, 1] in pulley stiles, and 
panelled spandrels, 10.3 x 2.9... do 


1 9 


i 

8 50 J 41G 50 








3 in oak sills, moulded, sunk, and 










7 1 

71 

116 

• 164 3 


1 30 | 92 30 
1 34 ' 95 14 
1 06 | 154 76 
12* 90 S3 
















2 in 2 circular do, 3.8 x 2.3 do 
















If, infreizc. with 2.10 in quatrefoils 

cut, 2.1.0 x 1.4 No. ! 












1* in planed for do, 3.0 x 1.5 do 














1* in rough, do 3.0 x 1.5 do 

3 x 4 wrought, moulded, and 
circular-headed frames put to- 

l£ in pulley stiles, 10.3 x 0.10} pairs. 














(*) 

6 

84 8 

13 6 

12 
[9 

123 9 
23 8 
19 8 
12 G 

161 6 
25 6 

217 9 

50 8 

82 4 

4 4 

112 8 
■! 1 

2G3 6 

9f5 3 

8 


2 50 
75 
123 
03 

35 


15 00 
4 50 
4 33 




















40 








3 x 2£ rebated circular heads, 4.4 

3 x 2£ squared for do, 4.4 long.. do 


4 20 








o 25 i 75 

08 ! 9 90 
08 i 1 89 
0G 1 IS 














ii in moulded facia, 2.{ wide linl. ft. 

21 x £ prepared for moulded facia.. do 












02 
01 


85 

1 7)2 


' 














04 I f > 










01 
02 
01 
02 
0- 04 


2 18 
1 01 
o 82 

























09 








3x4 Circular, sawn and cleaned.. do 


4 51 










02 ; SS 
02 5 27 
01 ! 9G 
13 > 1 04 


. 






















Double margin .sa.sh stiles, 4.6 No. 








long, 2\ x 2 











1 i 






... • J 


11736 73 






9 81 















133 



DULE G . 



Ground for Parliament Buildings, Ottawa. — Continued. 



Additional W 


ork. ' 


Heating and Ventilating. 


TOTAL. 




Quantities, j Bate. 


Amount. 


Quantities* 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities- 


Rate. 


Amount. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
6012 82 




$ CtB. 


$ cts. 
1451 46 




$ cm. 


$ cts. 
24119 08 













34 8 

26 

26 
85 7 
26 
26 
62 

25 
4 

49 

49 

71 

71 

146 

164 3 

1 
36 
36 

6 

6 
34 8 
13 6 

12 
19 

123 9 
23 8 
19 S 
42 6 

161 6 
25 6 

217 9 

60 8 

S2 4 

4 4 

112 8 
44 

263 6 

96 3 

8 


02 

9 30 

1 56 
12 1 

2 80 
2 90 
2 11 

2 00 

40 

8 50 

1 00 

2 00 

2 06 
1 65 

123 

1 25 
20 

15 

3 50 

1 00 

o m 

04 

42 
27 
10 
10 
08 
02 
01 
05 
01 
02 
01 
02 
- 05 
02 
02 
01 
18 


69 











1 
1 

i 


241 80 


26 


1 56 




40 56 






40 56 







1 


10 70 








i 


| 


72 80 






| 


j 


75 40 








.. ... 


109 72 


25" 


2 00 


60 00 
1 60 








60 00 


4 i 40 








I 60 










416 50 


49 


1 00 


49 00 




j 
i 


49 00 








142 00 










146 26 




1 1 1 




240 90 




1 




20 53 


] 


1 25 
20 
15 


I 25 


i 

! 




1 25 


30 


7 20 
5 40 






7 20 


36 








6 40 










21 00 














6 00 






| 






4 33 






1 






5^ 












r > 04 






i 






5 13 






1 






12 38 






j 






2 37 












• 1 57 






I 






85 






j 






1 62 


1 








1 27 




::::::::: :::::::::l::":::::::::::::: 






2 IS 


i 






1 01 


1 






f 


82 


j 






( 


09 


i 






1 


5 63 










:;z:z; £!!"".';;zi 


88 












5 27 












96 










i 


1 44 
















6167 83 






1451 46 

I 






25831 77 








l 








184 






SCIIE 
MEASUREMENT of Work prepared on 





DESCRIPTION. 


Contract Work. 


' ■■■"■ ""■ "~" *•" *»4 

Omissions from Contract. 


No. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount, 








$ cts. 


$ cts. 
11736 73 

26 
2 45 

1 82 

2 17 
10 

7 44 

i 96 

2 25 

3 99 
3 60 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
9 81 


17* 


Double margin sash stiles 4.0 No. 
2x2 


2 

49 

26 

31 

2 

31 

7 

9 
19 




13 

05 

07 
07 
05 

24 

28 

25 
21 
60 
















179 


Meeting rails squared, 2.3 long, 2i do 
x U 




ISO 


Centre bars tenoned, 2.3 long, 2x1 do 

Meeting rails moulded, 2.3 long do 

Stuff prepared for do, 2.3 long, 2£ do 
x 2 




131 








182 
















1 83 


Wrought and moulded frames, 4.9 do 
do Circular stuff prepared, 4.4 do 




184 
















185 


do partly prepared, do do 




186 








187 


IJ Pulley stiles, 10.3 x 10£ cut and pairs. 
















188 


3 Wrought, weathered and beaded No. 

oak sill, 3.0 x 1.6J morticed 

3 do not morticed... do 
3-J- x 1 Beaded linings linl. ft. 




189 














190 


22 
4 

120 
11 3 
24 2 

23 4 
4 6 

65 

22 

9 
28 
40 


02 
07 
02 
02 
03 
03 
03 
02 

25 

04 
15 
3 20 


44 
28 
2 40 
22 
72 
70 

13 

1 30 

5 50 

36 

4 20 

128 00 








191 


2 Circular heads of sashes, 3.8 long. No. 
5 x -J Facia dressed linl. ft. 








192 








193 


2x2 prepared for sash , do 








194 








195 


MAIN TOWER WINDOWS. 
3 x 3J Circular head for frame, No. 








196 








197 








198 
















199 


3x3 Transom, squared 2.6 long... do 

3J x 3 Stiles, squared 4.9 long do 

3x4 Frames for upper windows of do 
wing Courts, wrought and rub- 
bled 

3 Oak sills, wrought and weathered, do 
3.3 x 0.5 




VM 








?01 








202 










40 J 78 
40 | 1 45 


31 20 

58 00 

504 00 








"03 


2 inch 2 Light sashes for fixed do 
heads, 2.0 x 2.11 












204 


2 " 2 Light Casements with water do 
bar, 3.9 x2.11 












?0o 


Largo dormers and sash, as per No. 

Less, No. 11. — 6 cut brackets, 2.9 

x 1.5 and 37 bases for finials 

Small dormer, as per specification do 

Blocks for King-heads to roof, 1.2 

vO 4 \- S No. 


42 


12 00 












?06 


86 
2459 


3 00 
01 


258 00 
24 59 








?07 








208 








209 


1 Beaded architrave, 6 ft. wide supl. ft. 

Sash utiles 4 9 lonv 2x2 No 


63 9 
22 


09 
07 


5 74 
1 54 








210 








211 










71? 


Wrought Iron stanchions and sad- cwt. 




0.2.11 


9 00 


5 38 






















1 12795 67 

| 






9 81 




1 

■■■' " i;n i 1 I 


■ i »' ■■» 


* ■ |i in in 



Ottawa g8tU January. J86& 



135 



DULE G. 

Ground for Parliament Buildings, Ottawa. — Concluded. 



Additional Work. 


Hoatiug and Ventilating. 


TOTAL. 




Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount 


Quantities. 


Rate. 


Amount 


Quantities. 


Rato. 


Amonnt. 




$ Ctfl. 


$ cts. 
6167 83 




$ cts. 


$ cts.j 
1451 46 




$ cts. 


% CtH. 

25831 77 










2 

49 

26 
31 

2 

31. 

7 

9 

19 

6 

10 

J9 

22 
4 

120 

11 3 
24 2 

23 4 
4 6 

65 

22 

9 
28 
40 

40 
40 
40 
42 


18 

i) 08 

09 
09 
05 

27 

32 

30 
25 

75 

1 08 

80 
02 
08 
03 
03 
04 
04 
04 
03 

30 

05 
19 

2 50 

50 

1 20 

2 20 

22 00 

i 

j 


36 














3 92 














2 34 














2 79 














10 














8 37 












i 


2 24 













i 


2 70 












:::::::::;::::::: 


4 75 














4 50 


10 


1 08 
80 


10 80 
15 20 








10 80 


19 








15 20 











44 


.... 












32 














3 60 














34 


"\"";zr..;. 










96 














93 














18 














1 95 










i 




6 60 










i 




45 














6 32 


40 


50 


20 00 









ioo oo 










20 00 














48 00 














S3 00 














924 00 












i 

i 




2 


5 00 


10 00 




1 


88 
2459 

43 

63 9 

. 22 

! 392 

0.2.11 


5 00 

01 

1 00 
09 
10 

18 00 
28 00 


440 00 








24 59 


43 


1 00 


43 00 








43 00 










5 74 
2 20 














392 


18 00 


293 15 








7 05 










16 75 




i 














! 


6559 98 






1451 46 

I 






27630 2Q 


■ ...,.,. — . n 


' 








' 



THOMAS GUNDRY, 
JQHN BOWES. 



136 



SCHEDULE H. — Materials delivered for Parliament Building, Ottawa. 



No, 



10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
]9 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 

41 

42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 



DESCRIPTION. 



Pit and drift sand cube yds. 

Common lime : bushels. 

Prepared mortar do 

Water lime barrels. 

Fireclay do 

Do bags. 

Gravel and brokon stone prepared 

for concrete cube yds. 

Nepean spalls and chips toises 54 ft. 



Quantities. 




Limestone for rubble. 

Do rock excavated 

Bricks, common red, (about one- 
third of these are place bricks. 

Fire bricks 

Do for arches 

4 in. stoneware drain pipes 



do 
6 do 
8 do 
3 do 

8 do 

9 do 
9 do 
12 do 
12 do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



damaged 
dam ago d 
damaged 
damaged 
damaged 



do 
do 

M 
do 
do 
lin. yard, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
ao 
do 



6 in and double 4 in. junction No. 



do 
in and 6 
9 in and 4 

do 
9 in and 6 

do 
9 in and 9 

do 
12 in and 12 

4 in bends 

4 do do damaged 

6 do dO 

6 do do 
9 do do 
9 do do 



do damaged 

do do 

do do 

do damaged 
do do 

do damaged 
do do 

do damaged 
do do 



damaged 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



damaged 

Ornamental tena cotta chimney 

tops, 2 feet 8 inches high do 

do octagonal, do do 

do 3 feet 6 inches high do 

Ohio stone cube feet. 

4 inch limestone flagging sup. feet 



6 do 

8 do 

9 do 

3 do Nepean 

4 do do 

6 do do 

7 do do 

3 do Ohio 

4 do do 
6 do do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Potsdam stone cube feet. 

Floats lin. feet. 

Carried over 



1337 

41-5 

88 

184 

4 

8 

S4 

199 

780| 

134| 

1422613 

11382 

2800 

1C9J 

21* 

294§ 

85i 

6 

8§ 

108 

70S 

128 

6 

1 

1 







8 
3 



3 

8 

1 

13 ] 

2 | 

8 i 
2 ! 

13 

42 

2 
21686 

6 3 

136 

10 6 

9 
SI 
95 6 

632 10 

6 4 

4\ 8 

3 6 
1 9 

10 7 

1086 



$ cts. 

52 
11 

12* 

1 08 

2 00 
1 50 



50 
87 
87 
87 

3 85 
35 00 
40 00 
42 
32 
73 

55 

1 00 
75 



OS 
26 



94 
75 
55 
60 
70 



75 
55 
75 

55 

1 00 
82 
61 



46 
10 
10 
57 



4 00 
4 00 
4 00 
45 
09 
12 
15 
17 
08 
10 
15 
17 
12 
15 
23 
55 
02 



$ cts. 

095 24 

45 65 

11 00 
309 12 

8 00 

12 00 

42 00 
173 13 
679 26 
117 01 

5477 17 

398 37 

112 00 
71 12 

6 83 

215 10 

46 93 
00 
6 50 

113 40 
55 12 

161 28 

5 4 

7.3 

5 5 

4 80 



10 
52 



2 


6 75 
55 
6 00 
55 
3 00 
6 56 
61 
18 98 

2 20 
16 80 

3 14 

72 00 
168 00 

8 00 
9758 70 

50 
16 32 

1 58 

4 53 
6 48 

9 55 
9 4 93 

1 08 

5 00 
53 
40 
9 12 

21 72 



19017 23 



7 00 
55 00 
40 00 

95 

70 

1 25 
93 



50 

12 J 2 

55 

15 

00 

50 

00 



75 

90 

1 00 



1 25 



1 50 



2 00 

1 90 

2 50 

1 87 

3 10 
o on 



5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
70 
121 
15 
IS 
20 
12 
15 
20 
24 
20 
25 
35 
55 
03 



$ eta. 

1009 60 
83 00 
13 20 
414 00 
12 00 
10 00 

52 50 
473 13 
975 94 



9958 50 
398 37 
112 00 
160 86 

14 93 
308 33 

79 30 
9 00 
9 75 

167 40 
81 20 

256 00 
9 00 
1 00 
75 
7 20 
3 00 
75 

11 25 
93 

12 00 

93 
6 00 

15 20 

1 42 
50 



35 



3 74 
24 80 

4 64 

90 00 

210 00 

10 00 

15180 20 

78 
20 40 

1 89 
1 80 
9 72 

14 32 

126 50 

1 52 

8 33 
87 
61 

9 12 
32 58 



30278 94 



137 



SCHEDULE H. — Materials delivered for Parliament Buildings. — Continued. 



No. 



57 
58 

59 
60 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 
97 
98 
98 
100 
101 

102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 

108 
109 



DESCRIPTION. 



Brought forward, 



Cedars 

Pine spars in long lengths average 

12 inches diameter 

Slabs 

1 inch common pine boards 

1£ do do 

1^ do do in long lengths 

2 do do 

3 do do 

1 do second quality pine boards 
li do do 

Is do do 

2 do do 

3 do do 

4 do do 

% do first quality do 

do do 

do do 
li do do 
H do do 
II do do 

do do 

do do 
4 do do 
2 do oak common 

2 do do first quality 

3 do do do 

§ do bass wood 

i do cherry 

1 do do 

li do pine roofing boards 

H do do tongued and grooved 
1 do do do 
Common scantling 

do in long lengths 

Second scantling ;.. 

do in long lengths... 

Scantling for roof framing 

joisting 

Red pine 12 * 12, 55.0 and 67 

long 

Common oak scantling 

Seconds do 

Rolled iron joists 

Wrought iron girder-rivetted plate 

Bar and round iron 

Iron in blacksmith's shop not 

weighed, say 

Oil putty 

Glue, not weighed, say 

Oil, not measured, say 

Cut nails 

6 inch pressed spikes 

If do brads 



lin. feet. 

do 
M. B. M 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
tons, 
cwt. 
do 



Quantities. 



33 



Schedule Price. 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



02 

04 

4 00 
8 40 
8 40 

8 40 



70 
00 



9 90 



lbs. 

do 

gallons. 

lbs. 

do 

M 



6240 


30 


556 


1008 


140 


1416 


3950 


78071 


159 


1327 


100 


2191 


1928 


48939 


2969 


1464 


300 


114 


125.15.3.14 


19.1.14 


71.2.17 



9 
9 


90 j 
90 


9 


20 


8 


50 


8 


50 


11 


90 


11 


90 


11 


90 I 


12 


60 


13 


30 


13 


00 


12 


60 


11 


90 


11 


90 


25 


20 


35 


00 


35 


00 


11 

Fir; 


90 
(\r\ 



55 00 

8 40 

13 00 

13 00 



7 70 
7 70 
9 90 
9 90 
9 80 
9 80 

12 00 

25 20 
25 20 
90 00 



50 
25 



I do screws, No. 6 dozen. 

1 do do, 8 do 



Carried over 

18 



2350 

25 

25 

296 

32 

1 

8 

9i 



4 00 

20 

1 00 
04 
05 
30 
gross 
25 
30 



Amount. 



$ cts. 
19017 23 

66 

14 68 

1 71 
177 82 

26 20 

2 70 
37 

269 67 
33 46 
201 88 
679 68 
486 75 
67 75 

17 
3 

30 

■ 499 78 

986 36 

3263 62 

14 95 

1088 38 

840 91 

1 45 
157 25 

1 05 
19 46 
99 
70 



21 

79 



11 

7 

77 88 

33 18 

1014 92 

2 06 

10 81 

77 
21 69 
19 08 

479 60 
29 09 

17 5Q 

7 56 

2 87 

11321 43 

125 93 

233 87 

50 00 

94 00 

5 00 

25 00 

11 84 

1 60 
30 

17 

24 

41492 48 



Valuation. 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



03 

06 

5 00 

9 00 

9 00 

9 00 

8 50 

8 50 

10 50 

10 50 

10 50 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

18 00 

18 00 

18 00 

18 00 

18 00 

18 00 

18 00 

16 00 

16 00 

27 50 

37 50 

37 50 

18 00 

70 00 

70 00 

10 00 

15 00 



15 


00 


9 


00 


10 


00 


10 


50 


10 


50 


11 


00 


10 


50 


16 


60 


27 


50 


27 


50 


110 


00 


7 


50 1 


4 


50 


4 


00 





25 


1 


30 





05 





07 





35 





30 





36 





Amount. 



$ cts. 

30278 94 

99 

22 02 
2 14. 

190 52 

28 08 

2 89 

41 

327 46 

35 49 

214 11 

720 87 

529 08 

79 71 

20 
4 86 

46 58 
755 98 
T409 09 
4416 93 
20 70 
1554 84 
1130 64 

1 95 
171 60 

1 12 
20 86 
18 14 

9 80 

99 12 

39 50 

1171 06 

2 38 
11 94 

1 00 

23 00 
20 24 

538 32 

31 17 

24 30 
8 25 

3 13 
13837 31 

145 21 
322 43 

50 00 

94 00 

6 25 

32 50 
14 80 

2 24 
35 

20 
29 



58174 99 



138 



Schedule H. — Materials delivered for Parliament Buildings. — Concluded. 



No. 



110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 

118 
119 
120 



DESCRIPTION. 



Quantities. 



Brought forw ar d. 



li inch screws, No. 10 dozen. 



do 
do 
[2 do 
2£ do 
2\ do 
3 do 
3 do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



10. 
12. 
16. 
16. 

18. 
18. 
20. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



2 do brass axle pullies No. 

2J do do do 

Slates , square. 



Carried to general summary. 



Schedule Price. 



34* 

i 

2 

28 
12 
31 
12 

4 
2 



24 
400 



cts. 



50 
55 
60 
80 



00 
25 
50 
75 



dozen 

2 75 

3 00 
3 50 



Rate. Amount. 



$ cts. 
41492 48 

1 44 

02 

1 49 

80 

2 58 

1 25 
50 

29 

1 82 
6 00 

1400 00 



42,908 58 



Valuation. 



Rate. 



$ cts. 










60 





66 





72 





96 


1 


20 


1 


50 


1 


80 


2 


10 



3 50 

3 60 
6 00 



Amount. 



$ ets. 
58474 99 



1 73 

03 

1 68 

96 
3 10 

1 50 
60 
35 



2 32 

7 20 

2400 00 



60,894 46 



Ottawa, 28th January, 1863. 



THOMAS GUNDRY, 
JOHN BOWES. 



Materials at Brick Yard. 



121 


Bricks in kilns Nos. 1 arjd 2, west 


323165 

900 
100 

539350 
930 


$ cts. 

3 30 

09 
42 

3 30 
09 


$ cts. 

1066 44 

81 00 
42 00 

1779 85 
83 70 


$ cts. 

6 00 

15 
25 

6 00 
15 


$ cts. 

1938 99 
135 00 


122 


Clay dug up and carted to clay 


123 




25 00 


124 
T>5 


Bricks in kilns Nos. 1 and 2, east 


3236 10 
139 50 




Carried to general summary 










3052 99 




5174 59 











WM. HUTCHISON, 

Clerk of Works, Eastern Bksk. 



139 



SCHEDULE I.— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS. 

Particulars of Valuation of Sheds and Plant. 



Time-keeper's Office : 

856 feet B. M. framing, at $18 

132 do oisting, at , 18 

267 feet sup. 1J inch dressed flooring at 3 

784 feet sup. 1 inch sheeting, at 3 

179 feet sup. 1 inch partition, at 3 

12 feet lineal moulded capping, at , 

464 feet super, roof boarding and shingling, at 4 

675 do narrow clapboarding, at 2 

9 do shelf on beams 

69 do 1 inch narrow batten doors, at 

3 qi*s. 4-in. butts, at $0 15, $0 45 ; and 4-in. rimlock, 

1 pine desk, with 2 draworc 

68 ft. sup. If-in. sash and casement, glazed, at 

1 drawing-table, 2 large drawers and 3 trupels 



00 per 1000 ft. 
00 do 

50 per 100 ft. 
00 do 

50 do 

06 per foot. 
50 per 100 ft. 
25 do 

06 per foot. 
08 do 

30 



First Cost. 



25 per foot. 



Depreciation 30 per cent. 



Large Shed near Contractor's Office : 

768 ft. lineal flatted timber, at $ 04 

1256 ft. B. M. joists and sleepers, at 15 00 per 1000 ft. 

1076 do framing, at 16 00 do 



1530 ft. super. 

3770 do 

2880 do 

70 do 

68 do 



1^-in. dressed flooring, at 3 50 per 100 ft. 

1-in. rough sheeting, at 12 00 per 1000 ft. 

1-in. roof boarding, at 12 00 do 

lf-in. sash, glazed, at 20 per foot. 

rough door and 1 pair hinges 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Shed near Contractor's Office, Filled with Brick : — 

375 ft. lineal flatted timber, at $ 04 

2387 ft. B. M. framing, at 16 00 per 1000 ft, 

5441 ft. super. 1-inch rough boarding, at 12 00 do 

3022 ft. B. M. l£-inch rough flooring, at 12 00 do 

255 ft. super. ]£-inch dressed flooring at 3 50 per 100 ft. 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Stone Shed South of Building : — 

140 ft. lineal flatted timber, at $ 04 

1759 ft. B. M. framing, at 16 00 per 1000 ft. 

14934 ft. 1-inch roof boarding, at 12 00 do 

28326 ft. 1-inch rough clapboarding, at 15 00 do 

214 ft, B. M. oak, at 25 00 do 

145 lbs. screw-bolts, at 11 per lb. 

1448 lbs. bar iron fixed on track 08 do 

295 ft. super, lf-inch sash, glazed, at 20 per foot. 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Travelling carriage, with iron crab. 



Depreciation 20 per cent*. 



Shed adjoining the above, on South Side : 

130 ft. lineal flatted timber, at $ 04 

1550 ft. B. M. framing, at 16 00 per 1000 ft. 

2504 ft. 1-inch roof boarding, at 12 00 do 

3078 ft. 1-inoh rough clapboarding, at 15 00 do 

1 pair 14-inch T hinges 



Depreciation 30 per cent , 



$ cts. 

J 5 40 

2 37 

9 34^ 

23 52 

6 26£ 

66 

20 88 

15 19 

54 



5 


52 





75 


5 


10 


17 


00 


7 


00 


129 


34 


30 


72 


18 


84 


17 


22 



45 24 

34 56 

14 00 

2 00 



216 13 



23 00 
38 19 
65 29 
36 26 
89 25 



251 99 



5 60 

281 46 

179 20 

424 89 

5 35 

15 95 

115 84' 

59 00 



1087 29 



150 00 



5 


20 


24 


80 


30 


04 


31 


17 





35 


91 


56 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 



90 54 



153 29 



176 39 



761 10 



120 00 



09 



140 



SCHEDULE L— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.— Continued. 



Shed East of Stone Shed :— 

635 ft. B. M. framing, at $16 00 per 1000 ft. 

987 ft. 1-inch rough boarding, at 12 00 do 

987 ft. 1-inch roof boarding and shingling, at 4 50 per 100 ft. 

2666 ft. B. M. 3-iDch rough floors and sleepers, at 10 00 per 1000 ft. 

32 do stand, at 15 00 do 

32 ft. super. 1-inch rough doors, at 04 per foot. 

3 pairs 14-inch T hinges and 2 9-inch board bolts 

128 ft. l|-inch sash, glazed, at 20 per foot. 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Stone Cutters' Shed \r- 

18o ft. lineal flatted timber, at $ 

3928 ft. B. M. framing, at 16 

6225 ft. 1-inch roof boarding, at 12 

2121 ft. 1-inch rough clapboarding, at 15 

881 do sheeting, at 12 

60 do doors, at 

3 pairs 9-inch T hinges and 1-7-inch stock lock 

324 ft. 1-inch boards, at 10 

765 ft. 1^-inch dressed flooring, at 3 

3S3 ft. B. M. joisting, at 15 

837 ft. super, shingling, at 3 

531 ft. B. M. track, at 15 

70 ft. super, lj-inch sash, glazed, at 

282 do drawing board, at 

1 turning table 4 ft. diameter, complete 



04 

00 per 1000 ft. 
00 do 
00 do 
00 do 
04 per foot. 



First Cost. 



00 per 1000 ft. 
50 per 100 ft. 
00 per 1000 ft. 
25 per 100 ft. 



per 100 ft. 
„ per 1000 ft. 
15 per foot. 
06 do 



00 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Lime Shed, North of Legislative Council 



2114 ft. B. M. scantling, at $12 00 per 1000 ft. 

1376 ft. 1-inch rough boarding, at 12 00 do 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Lime Shed South East of Tower : — 

96 ft. flatted timber, ai $ 04 

340 ft. B. M. scantling, at 12 00 per 1000 ft. 

576 ft. B. M. 2-inch rough flooring, at 10 00 do 

690 ft. 1-inch rough boarding, at 12 00 do 



Depreciation 30 per cent. 



Platform at Engine House : — 

28 ft. lineal flatted timber, at $ 04 

480 ft. B. M. scantling, at 12 00 per 1000 ft. 

646 ft. B. M. 2-inch rough flooring, at 10 00 do 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Shed West of West Wing : 

200 ft. lineal flatted timber $ 04 

1920 ft. B. M. scantling, at 12 00 per 1000 ft. 

7845 ft. 1-inch rough boarding, at 12 00 do 

1 bell cot and bell 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



$ cts. 

10 16 

11 84 
44 62 
26 66 

48 



28 
35 



25 60 



121 79 



7 20 
62 85 
70 

82 



74 

31 

10 57 

2 40 



10 
24 



26 78 
5 75 

27 20 
7 97 

10 50 
16 92 
12 00 



301 00 



25 73 
16 51 



42 24 



21 96 



21 34 



8 00 
23 40 
94 14 

7 00 



132 54 



3 


84 


4 


08 


5 


76 


8 


28 



1 


12 


5 


76 


6 


46 



Present 
Value. 



cts. 



85 26 



210 70 



29 57 



15 37 



9 84 



92 78 



141 



SCHEDULE I.— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.— Continued. 



Carpenters' Shop : — 

11288 ft. B. M. framing, at $16 00 per 1000 ft. 

120 ft. lineal flatted timber, at , 04 per foot. 

6317 ft. sup. roof boarding and shingling, at 4 50 per 100 ft. 

6500 ft. B. M. 2-inch rough flooring, at 10 00 per 1000 ft, 

2414 ft. 1-inch rough flooring, at 12 00 do 

2425 ft. 1-inuh rough clapboarding, at 15 00 do 

196 ft. super l§-inck sashes and frames, glazed, at... 25 per foot. 

280 ft. B. M. lintels and scantlings, at 12 00 per 1000 ft. 

182 ft. sup. l|-inch sashes, glazed, at 20 per foot. 

7 doors and frames, at 1 25 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Smiths' Shop and Sheds adjoining : — 

178 ft. lineal flatted timber, at $ 04 per foot. 

2428 ft. B. M. rafters and joists, at 16 00 per 1000 ft. 

1440 ft. roof boarding and shingling, at 4 50 per 100 ft. 

1830 ft. 1-inch rough flooring, at 12 00 1000 ft. 

1710 ft. 1-inch rough clapboarding, at 15 00 do 

1232 ft. 1-inch sheeting (rough) 12 00 do 

300 ft. B. M. scantling, at 12 00 do 

107 ft. super, rough batten doors, at 04 per foot. 

28 ft. super. 1-inch cupboard front, at 07 do 

4 pairs strap hinges and 2 pairs 4-inch butts and dead lock 

2 pairs 3-inch butts and dead lock , 

2 forges, 2 fire-places each, at $20 00 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Engine House : — 

96 ft. lineal flatted timber, at 

1453 ft. B. M. joists ani rough floor, at 

2146 ft. B. M. framing, at 

1145 ft. 1-inch rough boarding, at 

798 ft. super. 1-inch roof boarding and shingling, at. 

Louvers in roof 

20 ft. super, sky-light, glazed, at 

18 do lf-inch sash, glazed, at 

. 64 do 1-inch rough doors, hinges and locks 

17 yds. rubble masonry, at 



5 04 per foot. 
12 00 per 1000 ft. 
16 00 do 

12 00 do 

4 50 per 100 ft. 



02 per foot. 
20 do 



2 25 



Depreciation 30 per cent 

1 8-horse power steam engine and hoisting apparatus 
Depreciation 10 per cent 



Shed West of Building :— 

1550 ft. 1-inch rough boarding, at $12 00 per 1000 ft. 

200 ft. B. M. scantling, at 12 00 do 

40 ft. sup. 1-inch rough dojrs, at 04 per foot. 

2 pairs T hinges, at 20 



First Cost. 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Contractors' Office : — 

1 brick safe, with iron door complete 

2 desks 

1 stove and pipes 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



$ ets. 

180 61 
4 80 

279 77 
6b 00 
28 97 
36 38 
49 00 

3 36 
36 40 

8 75 



693 04 



7 
39 


12 
71 


64 


80 


21 


96 


25 


65 


14 78 


3 


60 


4 


28 


1 


96 


3 


50 





50 


40 


00 



227 86 



3 84 
17 44 

34 34 
13 74 

35 91 



00 
00 
60 
00 



38 25 



157 12 
1200 00 



18 60 
2 40 
1 60 
40 



23 00 



110 00 


36 


00 


15 


00 



161 00 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 



485 IS 



159 50 



109 98 



1080 00 



15 80 



m n 



142 



SCHEDULE I.— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.— Continued. 



Dwelling Houses : 

Dwelling house and out offices, Wellington street. 

Gate House ■ ; 

Dwelling house, west of building 

do north do , 



Depreciation 20 per cent 



Plant 



7 pieces, 430 lbs., wrought iron purchase blocks, at 50c per lb. 



1 


do 


16 i 


nch 


3 


do 


13 


do 


2 


do 


14 


do 


4 


do 


13 


do 


1 


do 


12 


do 


1 


do 


10 


do 


1 


do 


9 


do 


1 


do 


13 


do 


1 


do 


10 


do 


2 


do 


13 


do 


1 


do 


13 


do 


1 


do 


12 


do 


1. 


do 


12 


do 


1 


do 


11 


do 


1 


do 


10 


do 


1 


do 


12 


do 


1 


do 


14 


do 


2 


do 


8 


do 


1 


do 


14 


do 


1 


do 


13 


do 


1 


do 


12 


do 



16 inches, woooden snatch block, iron strapped. 



single block L. V. sheave, at 20c per inch. 

do do do at 20c do 

double do do do at 30c do 

do do do at 30c do 

do do do at 30c do 

single do do do at 20c do 

double do not strapped at 22c do 

single do do at 13c do 

double do iron do at 45c do 

single do do do at 35c do 

single do no hook, at 32c do 

single do complete, at 35c do 

single do do at 35c do 

double do not strapped, at 22c do 

single do iron sheave, at 18c do 

single do do at 18c do 

double do do at 26c do 

double do do at 26c do 

double do do at 26c do 

single do do at 15c do 



Depreciation, 30 per cent. 



155 lbs. cast iron sheaves, at 8c per lb. 

17 do spun yarn, at 10c do . 

4 do oakum, at 8c do , 



1441 lbs. scaffolding rope (hemp), at 15c per lb, 
696 do line do do at 15c do . 



Depreciation, 50 per cent. 

4289 lbs tarred line at 18c per lb 

Depreciation, 30 per cent. 

375 lbs. Manilla line, at 12|c per lb 

Depreciation, 5 per cent... 



62 lbs. sling rope, at 20 per lb. 

375 lbs. 7-16-inch proof chain, at 07 do 

277 lbs. 2-inch do 07 do 

187 lbs. i and g-inch do 07 do 

1050 lbs. i-inch do 07 do 



Depreciation 20 per cent 



5 brick buckets, ir«n straped, 3.6 x 3.6, at $ 2 00 

6 do do 3.6 m 3.0, at 1 75 

Carried over 



First Cost. 



$ cts. 

550 00 

40 00 

180 00 

140 00 



910 00 



215 10 
8 00 

59 80 
5 60 



15 60 


3 60 


3 00 


1 80 


2 86 


1 30 


11 70 


4 55 


3 84 


4 20 


3 85 


2 20 


2 16 


2 52 


4 16 


3 64 


3 38 


1 80 


364 56 


12 40 


1 70 


32 


14 42 


216 15 


104 40 


320 55 


772 02 



46 88 



12 


40 


26 


25 


19 


39 


13 


09 


73 


50 


144 


63 


10 


00 


10 


50 





Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 



782 50 



255 19 



14 42 



160 28 



550 41 



44 53 



115 70 



1140 53 



143 



SCHEDULE I.— PARLIAMENT' BUILDINGS.— Continued, 



Brought forward. 



1 do do 40 m 4.0 

1 do do 5.0 h 5.0 

1 do not strapped, 3.6 m 3.6 

45 mortar boxes, at.... $ 

44 mortarboards, at 

7 grout boxes, at 

37 double band-barrows, at 2 

42 single do 1 

27bods, at 9 

27 wheel-barrows, at 2 

3 sand screens, 5.9 x 5.0, at 6 

9 lime pans, 9.0 x 5.0, at 3 

1 set Whipple trees 

1 wooden fly wheel 



45 
25 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
00 
00 



Depreciation 40 per cent 



5 double hand-barrows, new, at $ 2 50 

2 bob sleighs, not ironed, new, at 2 00 

1 brick moulding machine 

547 lbs. cast iron, for prymill, at $ 05 per lb. 

1082 lbs. do for derrick, at 05 do 



First Cost. 



1 large stone sleigh 

Water cart, and cask and barrel 

250 rounds of ladder, at $ 10 



Depreciation of 50 per cept. 



1 18-inch diameter grindstone, mounted , 

135-inch do do 

134-inch d2 grindstone, not mounted 

1 saw sharping frame . 

16 drawing boards, 580 ft. superficial at $ 05 per ft. 

1 do 2 drawers, 42 ft. do at 10 do 

1 boiler, 70 lbs, at 15 per lb. 

1 18-inch circular saw and shaft , , 

533 lbs. li-inch lead pipe, at . 11 do 



Depreciation 12£ per cent 



00 

50 
50 
50 
60 
00 



10 double benches, (joiners) $ 5 

3 single do do 3 

6 bench ccreens, do 

3 trammels, do 

9 wooden squares, at 

2 iron cramps, (joiners) 8 

1 plaining bench, 24 ft. long 

3 box stores, (3 feet,) at , $10 00 

40 links stove pipes, at 15 

1 pine desk, 2 drawers , 

5 stools, at , $ 40 

6 pattern pails, at 25 

1 cupboard , 

1 rough tool box, 4.6 x 3.0 * 3.0 

2 do 8.0 m 3-0 M 3.0, at $ 3 00 



Depreciation 30 per cent 



Carried over..,,,,,,,,,,,!,,.,,,,,,, 



$ cts. 



2 50 
4 00 
1 00 

20 25 
11 00 

3 50 
92 50 
63 00 
13 50 
52 50 
18 00 
27 00 



00 
00 



338 25 

12 50 

4 00 

100 00 

28 70 

54 10 



199 30 

10 00 

16 00 

25 00 



57 00 

3 50 
6 00 

3 25 

2 50 
29 00 

4 20 

3 50 
14 00 
64 13 



130 OS 

50 00 

10 50 

3 00 



50 

50 



16 00 

8 00 

30 00 

6 00 



5 00 
2 00 

1 50 
4 00 

2 00 

6 00 



150 00 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 
1140 53 



202 95 



199 30 



28 50 



113 82 



105 00 



1790 10 



144 



SCHEDULE I.— PARLIAMENT BTJILT>mG$.— Continued. 



Brought forward. 



3 pugmills at , $25 00 

2 iron crabs, at.. 30 00 

3 stone trucks, iron wheels, at 16 00 

1 do do at 

1 large derrick, main tower 

1 do library 

2 pairs shears, 45 feet long , $36 00 

1 do 40 do with wench 

2 do 30 do do at $38 00 

1 do 26 do no wench 

3 pair gins, 18 feet, do at $ 5 00 



Depreciatson 25 per cent 



5 Drum windlasses, at $16 

7 cisterns, 6.0 m 6.0 « 4,0, at 9 

28 2 ft. trussels, at 





1 

1 

1 



18 3 ft. 


do 


at 


47 4 ft. 


do 


at 


18 5 ft. 


do 


at 


142 6 ft. 


do 


at 


18 8 ft. 


do 


at 



00 
50 
50 
65 
75 
10 
25 
50 



Depreciation 30 per cent 
1 polishing frame 



4 do handles, at $ 1 50 

18 do boxes, at 50 

21 reverses, at 50 



Depreciation 20 per cent 



First Cost. 



40 bankers at.... $ 50 

9890 ft. B. M. 'Tramway, at $12 00 per 1000 ft. 

120 ft. 1-inch boards, at 8 00 

140 lbs. iron on track, at 08 per lb. 



Depreciation 12^ per cent. 



10252 ft. B. M. framed scaffolding, at 



$20 



450 ft. 1-inch boards, n> i>rtar beds, at 
4670 ft. B. M. 
6342 ft. do 
4500 ft. do 
40 ft. do 

175 ft. do 



runs, at ... - 12 

scaffolding scantling, at 9 

shear tracks, at 12 

oak, at 25 

chain box, at 10 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



13094 ft. lineal scaffolding poles, at $12 50 per M. ft. 

82 ft flatted cedar, at 03 per ft. 

25 ft. lineal derrick boom, at 25 do 



Depreciation 50 per cent 

Tools, bellows, anvils, &c, &c, in blacksmith's shop 

Depreciation, 25 per cent 

Shovelfl, picks, drills, purchase screws, &c, taken as approximate. 
Depreciation, 25 per cent 



Total. 



$ cts. ( 



Present 
Value. 



75 00 
60 00 
48 00 
35 00 

200 00 
60 00 
72 00 
45 00 

76 00 
20 00 
15 00 



706 00 

48 00 
66 50 
14 00 
11 70 
35-25 
19 80 
177 50 
27 00 



499 75 

2 00 

6 00 

6 00 

10 50 



27 50 

20 00 

118 60 

96 

11 20 



130 70 

205 04 
3 60 

56 04 
48 07 
54 00 



00 

75 



369 50 

163 68 
2 46 
6 50 



172 64 
150 00 



200 00 



$ cts. 
1790 10 



529 50 



279 83 



22 00 
20 00 

114 42 



258 65 



86 32 



112 50 



150 00 
$3363 32 



145 



SCHEDULE I.— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.— Continued. 



S UMMAR Y. 

Dwelling houses 

Sheds and travelling carriage 

Steam engine and hoisting apparatus 

Safe and office furniture 

Plant :— 

Consistiug of Derrick's tackles, carriages, implements of various kinds, 
and scaffolding 

Total 



First Cost. 



$ cts. 

910 00 
3660 00 
1200 00 

161 00 



4813 84 



$10,745 04 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 

782 50 
2576 84 
1080 00 

112 70 



3363 32 



7,915 39 



28th January, 1863. 



JOHN BOWES. 



SCHEDULE z.— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS. 

Plant in Brickyard West Side of Canal. 



Brickiln Shed, west side of Canal : — 

516 feet tamarac posts, at 7c per foot 

367 do do rafters and purlins, at 5c p r foot 

6517 do B. M. pine lumber, at $10 00 per M 

360 do common slabs, at 7 00 do 

Depreciation, 30 percent i 

Brickfield, Racks and Shields : — 

2914 feet tamarac posts, at 5c por foot 

47540 do B. M. pine lumber, at $10 00 per M 

Depreciation, 25 per cent 

Workmen's Shanties, and Stables : — 

2 shanties bricklined and plastered, $100 00 cash 

1 do do do 75 00 do 

1 stable for eight horses 

Depreciation, 25 per cent......... 



19 



$ 


cts. 


36 


11 


18 


35 . 


65 


47 


2 


52 


122 45 


145 70 


375 40 


521 


10 


200 00 


75 


00 


140 


00 


415 


00 


$1058 


55 



$ «ti. 



85 72 



390 83 



811 25 



$787 80 



146 



SCHEDULE {.—PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.— Continued. 



Sundries west si^e of Canal: — 

Item 1. — 3 brick-making machines, at $100 00 each.. 

Do 2. — 18 wheelbarrows, at 3 00 do .. 

Do 3. — 9 do at 4 00 do .. 

Do 4.— 2 box-carts, at 20 00 do .. 

Do 5. — 1 lumber waggon 

Do 6. — 30 cases brick moulds, at $ 2 50 each.. 

Do 7. — I force pump 

Do 8.— 3 clay mills, at $ 40 00 each.. 

Do 9.— 3 turn tables, at 15 00 do .. 

150 ft. 1| -inch lead pipe, 600 lbs., at 11 per lb 

Levelling and fencing brickfield 



Depreciation, 15 per cent. 
Do 30 do 

Do 25 do 



Items 1 and 8, $357 00 
do 2,3,4,5, 161 00 
do 6,7,9, 127 50 



First Cost. 



1586 00 



$1856 00 



Additions brought forward. 



PLANT IN BRIDKYARD EAST SIDE OF CANAL. 



Brickkiln Shed:— 

350 feet cedar posts, 9 inches , at 10c per foot. 

1357 do tamarac do, 5 to 6 do , at 6c do 

5580 do B. M. pine lumber at $10 00 per M 

810 do common slabs, at 7 00 do 

8 pair of hinges, at 07 per pair 

Temporary covering small kiln 

2 stables at $18 00 each 

A workman's shanty ; 



Depreciation, 30 per cent. 



Brick-drying Shed south side of Kiln : — 
11495 feet tamarac posts, 4 to 8 inches , at 5c per foot. 

21741 do B. M. pine lumber, at $10 00 per M 

23232 do common slabs at 7 00 do 

112 pairs of hinges, at 07 per pair 

22 lbs. iron straps, at 07 per lb 



Depreciation, 10 per cent. 



Brick-drying Shed north side of Kiln:— 
6120 feet tamarac posts, 4 to 6 inches 
1222 do B. M. pine lumber, at 
11616 do common slabs, at 
88 pair of hinges, at 



, at 5c per foot. 

$10 00 per M.... 

7 00 do .... 

07 per pair... 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 


$ cts. 


300 00 




54 00 




36 00 




40 00 




100 00 




75 00 




50 00 




120 00 




45 00 




66 00 




700 00 


766 00 



645 50; 



$1411 50 



First Cost. : Depreciation. 



$105S 55 
1586 00 



$2644 55 



$787 80 
1411 50 



35 00 
81 42 
55 80 

5 67 

56 

25 00 

36 00 
50 00 



289 45 



574 75 

217 41 

162 62 

7 84 

1 54 



964 16 



Depreciation, 10 per cent.. 



306 00 

122 24 

81 31 

6 16 



515 71 



$1769 32 



$2199 30 



202 62 



867 75 



464 14 



$1534 51 



147 



SCHEDULE *.— PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS. 

Plant in Brickyard East Side of Canal. — Continued. 



Sundries, 
Item 1. 
Do 2. 
Do 3. 
Do 4. 
Do 
Do 6. 
Do 7. 
Do 8. 
Do 9. 



part in Yard and part at the Parliament Buildings : — 

— 3 clay mills in yard, at $25 00 each 

— 1 do atbuilding, at 18 00 

— 2 wood pumps in yard, at 20 00 each 

— 4 brick-making machines at the buildings, at $100 00 each 
21 wheelbarrows do do at 3 00 do 

7 do do do at 4 00 do 

10 cast iron doors for kiln, at 1 00 do 

2 box-carts, at 20 00 do 

- 1 stone waggon , 



Depreciation, 15 per cent. 
Do 34 do 



Items 1,2, 3 4, 7, $461 55 
do 5, 6, 8, 9, 140 70 



Additions brought forward. 



First Cost. 

i 


Presen 
Value. 


$ 


cts. 


$ cts. 


75 


00 




18 


00 




40 


00 




400 


00 




63 


00 




28 


00 




10 


00 




40 


CO 




70 


00 




744 00 








602 25 






$744 00 


$602 25 


i| First Cost. 


Depreciation. 


1769 


32 


1534 51 


J . 744 00 


602 25 


| $2513 


32 


7136 26 



Ottawa, 13th January, 1863. 



WM. HUTCHISON. 



148 



SCHEDULE K 



SUMMARY of Work prepared, and Materials delivered at the Eastern Block 

Departmental Buildings. 



Contract Work $29,575 26 

Extra do 61 35 

Additional Work 558 78 

Ileatiing and Ventilating 5,394 15 

Total , $35,589 54 

Ccncmissioners valuation of the same $43,205 45 

BRICKS IN BRICK YARD. 

Oeatraci Work $836 05 

t isna r esion«rs valuation of the same $1,729 77 



Wm. HUTCHISON, 

Clerk of Wcrks, EastcrnBlock 



SCHEDULE L. 

Summary of Work prepared, and Materials delivered at the Western Block, 

Departmental Buildings. 



Contract work §12,347 71 

Extra work 236 56 

Additional work 6 00 

Heating and ventilation 1836 96 



Total ., $14,427 23 



Commissioners* valuation of the same $17,523 87 



Wm. HUTCHISON, 
Clerk of Works, East Block. 



SCHEDULE s 



DEPARTMENTAL B0ILDISGS, EASTERN BLOCK.-MEASUREMENT OF WORKS PREPARED AND OF MATERIALS DELIVERED 




Summary of Work 



Contract "Work 

Extra do , 

Additional Work 

Ileatiing and Ventilatinj 

Total 

Commissioners valaatio: 



COitrad "Work 

1 im .; 'esicrers valuat:'< 



Summary of Wor 



Contract work 

Extra -work 

Additional work 

Heating and ventila 

Total 

Commissioners' val 






151 
SCHEDULE L 

DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS, WESTERN BLOCK.— MEASUREMENT OF WORKS PREPARED, AND OF MATERIALS DELIVERED 



1 




Contract Work. 


Ouirsions from Contract. 


Ealra Work 




Additional Work. 


Heating and Vontilalion. 


Tula] Mcaaurvuiont. 


KIFTIOH. 


i 




1 I 
















1 




Quantities. 


Rale. 


Amount. 


Kale. 1 


AmoanL 


Quantities. 


Bate. 


Amount. 






Amount. 


QuanUlici. 


Rate. 


Am aunt. 


Quanlltloa. 


Bate. 


Anmuul. 


1 






$ ota. 


$ cu. 




$ cu. 


$ cu. 




$ ota. 


1 .■:.-. 




$ cu. $ cla. 




1 cu. 


$ rU. 




1 cu. 


1 CU. 




B. M. 


COO.'iO 10 M 1 
31140 1 - l» | 


758 OS 
201 03 
























aooso 


in 10 


7:il 17 


1 llMna lumber, eoeoad quIBj. 










s n„ 

I 


B. M. 

robie foot 
do 




8 40 

5"«"l 










'""iVJul" "i" 


li'ii" 


i« "ii" 












:::::::£::::::': 




1 ,0 

1 . mi 




1 
. go 




do 






































































<i » 










21S u 
































26 








do 


71 " 
21 


ill 


10 50 


























.1 


, g 


II in 


It 1' 


da 
do 


OS 


65 


i~ ;-• 


























1 

30 11 


i, |0 




do 


II 






























11 


g g 




do 


3 






























3 


g , 









eapl. tool. 






i "oil" 










o'2'l' 


'i» ii 




"00" 


OOo" 








377 

K 
333 




27 


1 


do 


mo 


.1 il 


00 40 


























igg 1 


11 J . 




















00 


42 


27 72 














00 " 


37 72 


















161 


Ii 


22 00 














1 








do 


























107 


70 00 


■ 




g g 


10 






























7011 


20 00 


I7S3 SO 


lull .1 


11 .;! 


1 ,' 






■ 







































«.|o«re.. 

... do 


300 

■ 


1 40 
ii 12 

13 

00 


1 so 

11., II 


"SSj 


partly 


prepared. 




















, g D 
13 

Mini 11 

1 


IK 

(, . 

"I 





































































do 






3 30 


























<o 








































SOI 




1 
















1 1 1 

1 




100 00 
1 00 

■ 



























1 11 


MM 

1 . 
n g 
























' 




07 




20 10 
























(17 11 







































223 












II 



























1 1 g 
































(230 iO 






|t l.M 






;i, | N 












1 



















Wu HUTCH] 



SUMMAR" 



Contrac 
Extra 

Addifio 
Ileatiin 



Ccncmi; 
Gosintc 



Summary 



Contract 
Extra w( 
Addition! 
Heating ; 



Commissi 



153 



SCHEDULE M. 
Departmental Buildings — Measurement of Plant at Eastern Block. 



Scaffolding plank, 3-inch 83908 ft. B. M. 

do do 37344 do 

121252, at $7 50 
Depreciated value 

Gangways, long lengths, 5433 ft. B. M., at $9 50 

Depreciated value 

Temporary joists and supports, and lumber of different scantlings 

used as plant, 26264 ft. B. M 9 00 

Depreciated value 

Square timber, 518 ft. cube, at 08 per ft. 

Depreciated value 

Scaffolding poles, 40 feet long, No. 442, at 30 each. 

Depreciated value 

Putloeks (iron-wood), No. 497, at 12 each. 

Depreciated value 

Ladders, No. 18,397 ft., at 10 per ft. 

Depreciated value 

Trestles, No. 127, 8 feet high, at 1 50 each. 

do 10,6 do 125 do 

do 3,5 do 125 do 

do 77,4 do 75 do 

do 65,3 do 65 do 

Depreciated value 

Wheel -Bavrows : — 

Wheel- barrows, No. 53 earth, at 2 50 each. 

do do 49 stone, at 2 50 do 

do do 2 brickyard 3 50 do 

do do 1 hand-cart 

Depreciated value 

Hand stone-truck, with cast-iron wheels 

Scales at stone lights, 230 ft. B.M., at 02 per ft. 

403 lbs. iron straps, at 07 

Depredated value , 

Hand-barrows, No. 51, at 1 50 each. 

Hods, 44, at 75 do 

Stone-boats, 18, at 1 75 do 

Depreciated value , 

Stone-boats (new, not made), No. 47, at „ ,... 1 00 each. 

Wheel-barrow frames, 6, at , 1 50 do 

Carried over. , ., 



First Cost. 



$ cts. 



909 39 



51 


61 


235 


37 


41 


44 


221 


00 


59 


64 


39 70 



190 50 

12 50 

3 75 

57 75 

42 25 



306 75 



132 50 
122 50 

7 00 
20 00 



282 


00 


14 00 

6 40 

28 21 


48 


61 


76 50 
33 00 
31 50 


141 


00 


47 00 
9 00 


56 


00 



2392 51 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 

454 70 
25 80 

158 37 
29 01 

165 75 
29 82 
10 82 



230 07 



196 70 



46 18 



112 80 



56 00 



1525 05 



154 



SCHEDULE M. 



Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued. 



Brought forward, 



First Cost. 



Derrick Poles : — 

50 ft. long, 9 inches diameter, at 15 per ft. 

Jib 30 ft. long, 9 inches diameter, at 15c. and iron mounting 



11 do do 

11 do do 

9 do do 

9 do do 
3 derrick poles, 39 ft. = 
2 do 60 do 
Two cross heads, with shelves, at $4 00 



Der. 


35 


do 


Jib 


30 


do 


Der. 


30 


do 


Jib 


26 


do 



117 ft. at 15c. per foot. 
120 do 15c. da 



15c. do do 
15c. do do 
15c 

15c. and iron mounting. 



Depreciated value. 



Traveller Frame, Main Sewer : — 

267 ft- cube lumber, at $ 15 per ft. 

6876 ft. B. M. do 20 00 do 

Crab on traveller 

369 bolts and stages, at 07 per lb. 



Depreciated value on first 2 items. 



Mortar Hoists, framed . — 

2981 ft. B. M. lumber, at 20 00 

1114 lbs. chain for hods, at 07 per lb. 

620 lbs. wheels (cast), at 04 do 

Two horse-powers, complete, at 45 00 



Depreciated value on first 2 items 

Derricks, framed : — 

1142 ft. B. M. lumber, at 20 00 per M. 

47 lbs. bolts, at, 9 07 per lb. 

12 sett journals, at 1 00 each. 



Depreciated value on first item 



Mortar Mills, No. 2, complete, at 25 00 

Horse-powers, 4 do 50 00 

2 brick-making machines, at 80 00 



Depreciated value , 



Traveller Frame, Stone Cutters' Shop : — 

4090 ft, B. M. lumber, at 15 00 per M. 

320 ft. cube do 15perft. 

218 ft. B. M. hardwood, at 04 do 

2263 lbs. iron rail, at 05 do 

Traveller and crab • 



Depreciated value on first 3 items. 
Carried over 



cts. 
2392 51 



50 
50 
25 
50 



4 50 
6 90 

17 55 

18 00 
8 00 



82 70 



41 55 

137 52 

25 00 

25 83 



229 90 



59 62 
77 98 
24 80 
90 00 



252 40 



22 84 

3 29 

12 00 



38 


13 


50 
200 
160 


00 
00 
00 


410 


00 



61 35 

48 45 

8 72 

113 15 

180 00 



411 67 



3817 31 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 
1525 05 



74 43 

25 83 
193 87 



24 80 
90 00 



123 84 



3 29 
12 00 



21 58 



348 50 



113 15 

180 00 



106 67 
2842 99 



155 



SCHEDULE M. 



Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued. 



Brought forward. 



Stone Cutters' Shed :— 

15477 ft. B. M. lumber, at 10 00 

440 cedars, 7 inches diameter, at 10 per. ft. 

50 stone-cutters' bunKers, at 1 25 



Depreciated value on first 2 items 



Blacksmiths' Shop : — 

160 ft. tamarac joists, 6 inches diameter, at 05 per ft. 

2915 ft. B. M. lumber, at 10 00 

26 ft. glazed sash, at 20 per ft. 

6 30-100th square shingling, at 3 00 

930 bricks in chimney, at 12 50 

$t yards masonry, at 2 67 



First Cost. 



Depreciated value. 



Carpenters' Shop : — 

26709 ft. B. M. lumber, at 12 00 

483 cedar posts, 10 inches diameter 07 per ft. 

399 glazed sashes, at 20 do 

29£ square shingling, at 3 00 

200 ft. matched boarding, at 20 00 



Depreciated value. 



Draughtsman's Office: — 

5459 ft. B, M. lumber, at 12 00 per M. 

70 cedar posts, 10 inches diameter, at 07 per ft. 

171 ft. glazed sash, at 20 do 

5 4-100 square shingling, at 3 00 



Depreciated value. 



Enclosed Lumber Shed : — 

13358 ft. B. M. lumber, at 12 00 

716 tamarac posts, 5 inches diameter, at 05 per ft. 

162 ft. flatted timber, at : 06 do 



Depreciated value. 



Open Lumber shed, Store House, Mould Boom, and Carving Shop : — 

19689 ft. B. M. lumber, at $10 00 per M. 

912 ft. cedar posts, 6 inches diam&ter, at 10 per ft. 

18£ squares shii gling, at 3 00 

204 ft. glazed sash, at 20 per ft. 



Depreciated value... 
Carried over, 



$ cts. 
3817 31 



154 77 
44 00 
62 50 



261 27 



8 00 
29 15 

5 20 
18 90 
11 62 
14 24 



87 11 



308 50 

33 81 

7y 80 

88 50 

4 00 



514 61 



65 50 

4 90 

34 20 

16 12 



120 72 



160 28 

30 80 

9 72 



200 80 



Present 
Value. 



$ ots. 
2842 99 

62 50 
149 08 



14 24 
62 79 



463 15 



108 65 



184 72 



196 


89 




91 


20 




55 


50 




40 


80 




384 39 








295 57 






5386 21 


4183 60 



156 

SCHEDULE M. 

Depaktmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued. 



Brought forward 



Mortar Mill Shed : 

1420 ft. B. M. lumber, at 12 00 

151.73 ft. cube do at 15 per ft. 

*l\ squares shingling, at 3 00 

Grinding and 'floor of do 



Depreciated value on first 3 items. 



Firewood Shed at Engine House : 

1367 ft. B. M. lumber, at 10 00 per M. 

150 ft. tamarac posts, 6 inches diameter, at ,... 05 per ft. 



Depreciated valuo 

Steam House for Steaming Lumber, Brick, and Cement : 

2498 ft. B. M. lumber, at 12 00 per M. 

94 ft. flatted timber, at 06 per ft. 

84 ft. cedar poses, 10 inches diameter, at 07 do 

5 25-100 squares tar and gravel roof, at 4 00 

17595 brkks, at $12 50 per M. 

144 yds plastering, in cement, at 15 

5 ft. glazed sash, at , ... 20 



Depreciated value. 



Engine House : 

2118 ft. B. M. lumber, at 11 00 

78 ft. flatted timber, at 07 per ft. 

b\ squares shingling, at 3 00 

30 ft. glazed sash, at 20 

11 ft. sheet iron chimney, at... 25 

5909 brkks, at 12 00 

Ventilation on rojf , 



First Cost. 

$ cts, 
5386 21 



17 04 
22 76 
22 50 
80 00 



Depreciated value 

Stone Saw Frame : 

393 ft. dressed lumber, at 22 

131 ft. dressed hardwood, at 30 

18 turned rollers, at 

279 lbs. iron slides, planed, at 10 per lb. 

129 lbs. bolts and axletrees, at 08 do 

4 small cast-iron wheels , 



00 
00 
25 



Clerk of "Works Office :— 

2511 ft. B. M. lumber, at 15 00 per M. 

600 ft. grooved and tongued, at 20, 00 do 

35 ft. glazed sash, at 20 per ft. 

281 ft. B. A. tables and desks, at 03 do 

3 85-100 squares shingling, at 3 00 

4 drawers, with locks, at 60 each. 



Carried over. 



142 30 



13 67 
7 50 



21 17 



29 97 



5 64 
5 88 

21 12 
219 93 

21 60 
1 00 



305 14 



25 41 

5 46 
16 50 

6 00 

2 75 
73 86 

3 50 



133 48 



8 64 

3 94 

4 50 
27 80 
10 52 

6 00 



61 40 

37 66 
12 

7 00 

8 43 
11 55 

2 40 

79 04 
6128 74 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 
4183 69 



80 00 
59 19 



U 88 



270 58 



120 U 



61 40 



4790 88 



15T 

SCHEDULE M. 

Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued. 



Brought forward. 



Clerk of Work's Office i—Continutd 

One plain case 

One rack 

Stove and pipes 

400 bricks in chimney, at , 12 00 

Office Stools 



Foreman's Office — Same as above 



Time-keeper's Office. 
Stove and pipes. 



Watchman's Offiee 



Water Tank :_ 

1047 ft. B. M. lumber, at $30 00 per M. 

373 lbs. iron hoops, at 03| per lb. 

Supports under do , 



Depreciated value. 



Lead Pipes : 

73 ft. 1 2 -inch bore, 
262| ft. 2* do 



52^ 



lbs.r 

488 ft. 1 do 967 lbs! ( 

Pump logs, 410, 3-inch bore, at 15 per ft 



1839 lbs. «? = 2859 lbs., at 11 per lb. 



Depreciated value on pump logs 



Engine Shed at Canal : — 

2927 ft. B. M. lumber at $12 00 per M. 

2 88-100 squares shingling, at .'.... 3 00 per sqr. 

Circular-saw frame and gearing 

Steam engine, 6-horse power 

Rotary pump (Halley's patent) 

Frame for do 



Depreciated value. 



Sheds Covering Brick Piles : — 

2588 ft. B. M. lumber, at $10 00 per M. 

Iron rack, 331 do 10 00 do 



Depreciated value. 



Sundries : — 

26 patent rails, at $ 20 each. 

8 watering cans, at 2 00 do 

37 old shovels, at 1 00 do 



20 



Carried over, 



First Cost. 


Present 
Value. 


$ cts. 
6,128 74 

6 00 
2 00 
6 00 
5 00 
2 25 


$ cts. 
4,790 88 


21 25 

100 29 

16 00 
6 00 


100 29 
100 29 


22 00 
10 00 

31 41 

13 99 

6 00 


22 00 
10 00 


51 40 


43 09 


314 49 
61 50 


314 49 


375 99 


56 13 


47 12 
8 64 

25 00 
500 00 
400 00 

10 00 




997 06 


64a 40 


25 88 
3 31 




29 19 


21 90 


5 80 
16 00 
37 00 




58 80 




7,788 42 


6,104 47 



158 



SCHEDULE M. 



Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued. 



Brought forward 

Sundries. — {Continued.) Brought Forward 

3487 lbs. ropes, at 11 per lb. 

140 iron castings, at 04 do 

2 hand-saws, at 1 25 each. 

46 earth piiks (old), at 50 do 

1 sett steel letters 

do figures 

4 levels, at 2 50 each. 

7 cornbrooms, at 25 do 

3 sand sieves, at 1 00 do 

2 water rams, at 25 00 do 

1 plumber's portable furnace 

20 oil cans and paint pots, at 30 each. 

20 plumber's soldering irons, at 1 50 do 

1 kit engineer's tools . 

2 brass trammel heads, at 3 00 each. 

4609 lbs. e^uariy drills and bars, at 07 per lb. 

Depreciated value , .... 

Tackle Blocks (wood) : — 

1 12-inch double 12 inches 

8 10-inch do 80 do 

2 9-inch do 18 do 
8 6-inch do 38 do 



First Cost. 







148 inches, at 


1 12-inch 


single 


12 inches 


14 10-inch 


do 


140 do 


6 9 inch 


do 


54 do 


3 8-inch 


do 


24 do 


10 7-inch 


do 


70 do 


2 4-inch 


do 


8 do 



20 p©r in. 



308 inches, at 12^ per in. 

Depreciated value 

Sundries in Store House : — 

2070 lbs. proof chain, at $ fi| per lb. 

360 lbs. quarry sledges and picks, at 20 do 

96 ft. leather belting, at 62 do 

1945 lbs. castings, derrick crabs, at 06 do 

2 pit saws, 65 ft. long, at 7 00 

1 cross cut saw 

1 do 

2 bench vices, (iron), at $10 00 

2 pair blacksmiths bellows, at ? 21 00 

15 pair do tongs, at 65 

6 pair do do at 60 

11 setts fire backs, at 2 50 

24 swedges, at 50 

5 ecrew wrenches, at 1 25 

3 anvils, at 18 00 

Carrsd orer .,, ,,,,, ,.«......<• .,.•....„. 



$ cts. 
7,788 42 



58 


80 


383 


57 


5 


60 


2 


50 


23 


00 


2 


0J 


1 


00 


10 


00 


1 


75 


3 


00 


50 


00 


3 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


322 


63 


886 


85 



Present 
Value. 



$ ot*. 
6,104 47 



29 60 



696 If 



38 50 



68 


10 

1 


134 


55 


72 


00 


58 


90 


117 


90 


14 


00 


5 


00 


4 


50 


20 


00 


42 


00 


9 


75 


3 


60 


27 


50 


12 


00 


6 


25 


54 


00 


581 


95 



67 89 



9,266 62 



6,768 68 



159 



SCHEDULE M. 

Departmental Buildings.— Measurement of Plant, &c— Continued. 



Brought forward. 



Sundries in Store House. — Continued. 

2blo(ks for do 1 

3 setts die plates and dies, at * 10 

4 chopping axes, at 1 

12500 ft. fuse, at 3 

100 lbs. alum, at 

581b?. lamp black, at 

63 lbs. borax, at 

464 lbs. rope, (new), at 

128j lbs. cast steel, ball and frame 

34 new shovels, at , $ 1 00 

863 lbs. iron tackle block, at 14 



50 
00 
00 
10 
08 
10 
25 
11 per lb. 



Depreciated value. 



Machinery and Tools in Carpenters Shop : 

10 horse-power engine 

1 Daniel's planer 

Tay & Co's., tennoning machine 



do sticker 

do perpendicular saw 

do irregular moulder 

do circular saw, from 6 to 16-inches 

do side-planer and borer 

do cut off saw 

do upright saw 

Lining cross-cut saw 

Circular ripping saw 

do d * 

Grooving machine 

Saws and knives, connected with machine 

Turning lathe , 

Turning do , , 

2s ft. grindstone and grinding machine , 

1 carpeuter's cramp, (wood) 

Bench vice, (iron) 

8 carpenter's benches, double, at $ 7 00 

3 do single, at. 4 00 

3 cabinet maker's do at 12 00 

16 hand screws, at 50 

32 ft. 2-inch iron shafting, 470 lbs, at 07 per lb. 

17 driving pulleys, at 3 00 

270 ft. 2-inch India rubber belting, at 17 do 

48 ft. 8-inch do do 46 do 

No. 3. — 4i ft. stoves and pipes, at 34 00 



Depreciated value 

Two buildings occupied by foremen, Departmental Buildings, at $500 each. 
Total Plant at Eastern Block 



First Cost. 



$ cts. 
9,266 52 



3 CO 

50 00 

4 00 
38 75 

8 00 

5 80 
15 75 

51 04 
40 55 
34 00 

121 32 



352 21 



1400 00 

328 00 

183 00 

224 00 

160 00 

100 00 

33 00 

48 00 

16 00 

100 00 

26 00 

40 00 

25 00 

28 00 

100 00 

40 00 

35 00 

12 00 

25 00 

6 



00 
56 00 
12 00 
36 00 
8 00 
32 90 
51 00 
45 90 
22 80 
102 00 



3292 60 



1000 00 



$13,911 33 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 
6,758 53 



790 40 



2206 t2 
1000 f0 



$10,755 75 



160 



SCHEDULE M. 



Departmental Buildings — Measurement of Plant at Western Block. 



3 inch scaffolding planks per B M 26244 

2 do do do 76800 



Depreciated value. 



103044 at $7 50 



Gangways, long lengths, 3325 ft., B. M., at 9 00 

Depreciated value 



First Cost. 



Temporary joists and supports, 14752 ft., B. M., at 9 00 

Depreciated value 



Square timber, 155 ft., cube, at 08 per foot. 

Depreciated value 



Scaffolding poles 49 feet long, 255 at 50 each. 

Depreciated value 



Putlock (iron wood) 203, at 12 each 

Depreciated value 



Ladders, 222 feet, at 10 per ft. 

Depreciated value 



Trestles, 88— 8 feet high, at 1 50 each. 

Do 152—4 do 75 do 

Do 34—3 do 65 do 



Depreciated value. 



Wheel-Barrows : — 

9 earth, at 2 50 each. 

6 hand barrows, at 1 50 do 

18 hods, at 75 do 

6 slime boats, at 1 75 do 



Depreciated value. 



Hand stone truck : — 

1 with cast iron wheels 

66 feet scales at stone lifts, at 02 per foot. 

741 lbs. iron straps, at 07 



Depreciated value. 



Derrick Poles : — 

30 feet long, 10 in. dia., at 15 per foot. 

Jeb 30 feet long, 9 in. dia., at 15 do 

1 60 feet, 10 in. dia. and cross head with shelves 

I double geared crab 

3 sett lumber rollers, framed 3 50 

3 tool chests, 3 mortar pans, 20 mortarboards 



Depreciated value.. 
Carried over. 



$ cts. 

772 83 ■ 
29 92 



132 76 



12 40 



127 50 



24 36 



22 20 



132 00 
114 00 

22 10 



268 10 



22 50 

9 00 

13 50 

10 50 



55 50 



14 00 
1 92 

16 87 



32 79 



4 50 

4 50 I 
13 00 ! 
70 00 
10 50 
28 25 ! 



Present 
Value. 



130 75 



1609 11 



$ cts. 

386 41 
14 86 
92 94 
8 68 
95 63 
14 18 
11 10 



198 83 



38 85 



31 IB 



117 68 



1010 42 



161 



SCHEDULE M. 



Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued.. 



Brought forward. 



Mortar wells, 1 at 25 00 

Horsepower do 4, at 40 00 each. 



First Cost. 



Depreciated value 



Mortar Hoist framed : — 

2981 feet, B.M, lumber, at 20 

1114 lbs. chain for hods, at 

620 lbs. wheels cast, at , 



00 

07 per lb. 

04 do 



Two horse powers, at 45 00 each. 



Depreciated value. 



Derrick Framed: — 

480 feet, B.M. , lumber, at 20 00 

15 lbs. bolts, at 07 per lb. 

Gearing complete 



Depreciated value. 



Stone Cutter's Shed, No. 1 : — 

7069 feet, B.M., lumber, at 10 00 

270 feet cedar posts to 8 in. dia., at 07 per foot. 

61 feet tamarac to 4 do 05 do 



Depreciated value, 



Traveller Frame at Stone Cutter's Shed : — 

3047 feet, B.M, lnmber, at 15 00 

336 feet square do 15 per foot. 

209 do B.M , hardwood, at 64 

1783 lbs. iron rails, at 05 per lb. 

Traveller and crab 



Depreciated value. 



Stone Cutter's Shed, No. 2, and Iron Rack : — 

3129 feet. B.M., lumber, at 10 00 

133 do cedar posts, 8 in. dia., at 07 per foot. 

36 stone cutter's bunkers, at 1 50 each. 



Depreciated value. 



Sheds covering Brick piles and Slates : — 

9237 feet, B.M., lumber, at..., 10 00 

Depreciated value 



Lime Shed : — 

1676 feet, B.M., lumber, at 10 00 

1709 do common boards, at 7 00 



Depreciated value.., 
Carried over. 



Present 
Value; 



$ cts. 
1609 11 

25 00 

160 00 



18e 00 



59 62 
77 98 : 



$ cts. 
1010 42 



157 25 



24 
90 


80 
00 


114 80 


252 


40 


123 84 


9 
1 

28 


60 
05 
50 




39 


15 


35 24 


70 

18 

3 


69 
90 
05 




92 


64 


69 48 


45 

50 

8 

89 

180 


70 
40 
36 
15 
00 




373 


61 


263 17 


31 

9 

54 


29 
31 
00 




94 


60 


84 45 


92 


37 


69 28 


16 
11 


76 
90 




28 


66 


21 50 






2767 


54 


2049 43 



162 



SCHEDULE M. 

Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Coniiued. 



Brought forward. 



Water Tank :— 

1047 feet, per B.M. lumber, at 30 00 

373 iron straps, at 03| each. 

12 leet, 2j inch loose lead pipe, 84 lbs., at 11 per foot. 

755 feet pump logs, 3 in. bore, at 15 do 

120 ieet, 1 in. bore gas pipe, at 22 do 

3 brass stop cocks, at 1 50 each. 

1 do io 10 00 



Depreciated value. 



Stone Cutter's Shed, No. 3 :— 

6830 leet, B.M., lumber, at 10 00 

9 80 100 square shingling, at 3 00 

72 feet glazed sash, at 20 per foot 



Depreciated value. 



Blacksmith's Shop in front of Building, No. 1, Mould Rroom and 
Store House : — 

9343 feet, B.M., lumber, at 10 00 

143 feet cedar posts, 10 in. dia 09 per foot 

14 56-100 square shingling, at 3 00 

54 feet glased sash, at 20 per foot 

5j yds. masonry, at 2 67 

1300 bricks per M., at 12 50 

Depreciated value 

Foreman '« office • • 

Guard-house at entrance gate 



Blacksmith's Sbop in front of Building No. 2 : — 

2609 feet, B.M., lumber, at 10 00 

951 bricks for chimney 12 50 

20 feet glased sash , 20 per foot. 

4 17-27 yds. masonry, at 2 67 

Stables and Waggon Sheds : — 

12373 feet, B.M. lumber, at 12 00 

304 do tamarac posts, at 05 per foot. 

160 do cedar posts, at 07 do 

71 do do sleepers 07 do 

9 squares shingling 3 00 



Cribs 



30 feet glazed sash, at 20 



do 



Depreciated value.., 
Carried over. 



First Cost. 


Present 
Value. 


$ 


cts. 


$ ots. 


2767 54 


2049 43 


31 


41 




13 


99 




9 


24 




114 


75 




26 40 




4 


50 




10 


00 




210 


29 


174 34 


63 


30 




29 


40 




14 


40 




112 


10 


00 65 


93 43 




12 


87 




43 


68 




10 


80 




14 


68 


14 68 


16 


25 




191 


71 


151 50 


to 


00 




8 


00 




88 


00 


83 00 


26 


09 




11 


87 




4 


00 




11 


13 


11 13 


53 


09 


33 86 


148 


47 




15 


20 




11 


20 




5 


04 




27 


00 




6 


00 




4 


CO 




216 


91 


195 22 






3639 


64 1 


2t08 61 



168 



SCHEDULE M. 



Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued. 



Brought forward. 



Blacksmito'3 Shop, No. 3 :— 

9400 feet, B.M, lumber, at 12 00 

319 do tiimarac posts, 6 in. dia., at 05 per foot 

21 86-100 square shingling 3 00 

199 feet glazed sash, at 20 do 

4560 bricks, at 12 50 

2 ventilators on roof, at 3 00 each. 

5 tod drawers in benches, at 50 do 

20 20-27 yds. masonry 2 67 




Depreciated value. 



Iron and Coal Shed : — 

4S50 feet, B.M. lumber, at 10 00 

245 do tamarac posts, 6 ia. dia., at 05 each. 

8 94-100 square shingling, at 3 00 

24 feet glazed sash, at 20 per foot. 



Depreciated value. 



Toole in Blacksmith's Shops Nos. 1 and 3. 

6 anvils, at $18 00 each. 

6 wood blocks under anvils, at 1 50 do 

6 pair 2$ foot bellows, at 21 00 per pr. 

1 do 3 do do at 

1 do 2 feet 3 inches circular bellows, at 

1 portable forge and bellows, at 

29 pair tongs, at 65 per pr. 

7 anvil hammers, at 80 each. 

5 sledge do at 2 20 do 

2 set large swedge blocks, at 10 00 per s't. 

1 set templates for erecting 

20 patterns for do 

4 bench vices, at , 10 00 each. 

20 small swedges, at 50 do 

1 cast iron heel plate 

12 cold chisels, at 20 each. I 

6 pair small dividers, at 15 perpr. 

1 cast iron setting plate.... 

4 bell augers, at 40 each. | 

la dozen plugs and feathers, at 95perdozi 



Depreciated value. 



Sundries in Storehouse : — 

141 5 pounds old ropes, at $ 11 per lb. 

1744 do proof chain, at 06$ do 

418 do iron tackle blocks, at 14 do 

240 do quany drills and bars, at 0.7 do 

7 barrels Hull cement, at 1 75 perbrl 

5 shovels, at 1 00 each. 

1 2-loot boiler 



Carried over,, 



3639 64 



Pr sent 
Value. 



$ cts. 
2808 61 



112 


80 




15 


95 




65 


53 




39 


80 




57 


00 




6 


00 




2 


50 




53 


93 


53 93 


353 


56 


169 67 


48 


50 




12 


25 




26 


82 




4 


80 




92 


37 


83 41 


108 


00 




9 


00 




105 


00 




21 


00 




18 


00 




2,-i 


00 




18 


85 




5 


60 




11 


00 




20 


00 




30 


00 


1 


30 


00 




40 


00 




10 


00 




12 


00 




2 


40 







90 




14 


00 




1 


60 




1 


42 


1 42 


486 77 








403 OS 


155 


43 




113 


66 




58 


52 




16 


80 




12 


25 




5 


00 




3 


50 




4937 


50 


3520 07 



164 

SCHEDULE M. 
Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant, &c. — Continued. 



Brought forward. 



Sundries in Store House. — Continued. 

15 10-inch single-tackle blocks, 150 inches (wood), 



2 8-inch do do 

2 8-inch do do 

5 10-inch double-tackle blocks, 

3 8-inch do do 
3 8-inch do do 

188 pounds new rope, at 

100 do lamp black, at 

1 barrel rosin 



16 

166 

50 

24 

74 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



First Cost. 



12*. 

20. 

11 per lb. J 
10 do 



Depreciated value 

Total plant in western block. 



$ cts. 
4.937 50 



20 75 



14 80 

20 68 
10 00 
17 00 



83 23 



5020 73 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 
3,520 07 



328 37 



3848 44 



Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Plant in Brickyard. 



Brickkiln Shed :— 

3818 feet B. M. lumber, at $10 00 per M. 




240 
162 
276 
4y6 



do cedar posts, at. 

do do at 

do tamarac do, at 

do common slabs, at. 



10 each. 
07 do 
05 do 
7 00 per M. 



Depreciated value. 



Drying She'd and Sundries in Brickyard : — 

4207 feet B. M. lumber,at $10 00 per M. 

8640 do common slabs, at 7 00 do 

22 wheelbarrows (earth), at 2 50 each. 

10 do (brickmakers), at 3 50 do 

4 brickmaking machines, at 80 00 do 

2 cast iron rollers, at 20 00 do 

154 feet 1-inch gas pipe, at 22 per ft. 



Depreciated value. 



Carried ov»r. 



38 18 
24 00 
11 34 
13 80 
3 47 



90 79 



42 07 
60 48 
55 00 
35 00 
320 00 
40 00 
33 80 



586 35 



677 14 



$ cts. 



54 48 



501 10 



555 58 



1G5 



SCHEDULE M. 

Departmental Buildings. — Measurement of Work in Brick Yard. — Continued. 



Brought forward. 



Racks in Brickfield : — 

128130 feet B. M. lumber, at $10 00 per M. 

1800 do codar posts, at 07 per ft. 

3000 do tamarac do, at 05 do 



Depreciated value. 



Office and Tools in Brickfield : — 

1184 feet B. M. lumber, at $12 00 per M, 

Door lock and hinges 

10] feet glazed sash, at *. 20 per ft. 

16 shovels, at 1 00 each. 

50£ pounds crowbars, at 07 per lb. 

Ono small iron pump 

Ono large forco do 



Depreciated value. 



Clay Mills and Sheds :— 

670 feet B. M. lumber, at $10 00 per M, 

2216 do common slabs, at 7 00 do 

4 clay wells complete, at 25 00 each. 

1 do do at 

4 tnrning tables, at 5 00 each. 

4mouldingdo, at 1 50 do 

Brick moulds and shed on brickfield 

9729 feet B. M. lumber (new) 8 00 per M. 



Depreciated value. 



Levelling brickfield, making drains, &c, &c. 
Fencing do 



Total plant in brickyard. 



SUMMARY. 



Plant at Eastern Departmental Building. 
Do at Western do do 
Do at Brickyard 



First Cost. 



$ cts. 
677 14 



1281 30 
126 00 
150 00 



1557 30 



14 20 



60 
JO 



16 00 

3 54 

10 00 

65 00 



112 44 



6 70 

15 51 

100 00 

20 00 

20 00 

6 00 

50 00 

77 83 



296 04 



200 00 
100 00 



300 00 



2942 92 



13911 33 
5020 73 
2942 92 



Totals 



$21874 98 



Present 
Value. 



$ cts. 
555 58 



1167198 



9L 98 



270 81 



300 00 



2386 35 



10,755 75 
3,848 44 
2,386 35 



$16,990 54 



21 



Wm. HUTCHISON. 



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SCHEDULE 0. 

Ottawa Buildings. — Estimate of External Work. 



3S25C 



Excavating grounds 

Excavating foundations, front walls, 
Sodding and planting grounds ....... 

Removing rubbish off grounds 

Iron fence in front of grounds 

Masonry in do do 

Large gates 

Roots 



Lodge 

Small gates 

Steps 



Macadamizing roads 

Fencing round outside of grounds, 1000 yards 

Engine fixed for supplying reservoir 

Engine house, smoke shaft, complete 

Cistern 



Coffer-dams 

Steps down bank, river 

Piping to reservoir 

Offtake drain-pipes, from building to river. 

Excavatiou for do 

Main pipes for conveying gas to buildings . 



PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, OTTAWA. 

General Summary. 



eta, 



15,568 


00 


650 


00 


20,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


13,000 


00 


8,400 


00 


1,000 


00 


2,400 


00 


3,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


6,899 


00 


10,800 


00 


1.000 


00 


5,000 


00 


8,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


2,000 


00 


14,700 


00 


3,000 


00 


2,258 


00 



$128,675 00 



Valuation at Schedule and 
Progress Estimate Rates. 



Measurement of work done, as ; er Schedule A 

Measurement of woik prepared, as per Schedule G.. 

Measurement of materials on ground, as per Sche- 
dule H 

Measurement of materials at brickyard, as per Sche-| 
dule A 

Day accounts, as per Schedule A 



Total amount of work done and materials delivered. 
Plant, as per Schedule I 



Amount received by contractor., 



$ cts. 

335498 67 
20511 10 

42908 58 

3052 99 
18503 36 



$420474 70 
10052 12 



$430526 82 



$483163 95 



Commissioners' Valuation 



$ eta. 

328961 08 
27630 26 

60894 46 

5474 59 
18503 36 



$441463 75 
10052 12 



$451515 87 



Ottawa, 28th January, 1863. 



THOMAS GUNDRY, 
JOHN BOWES. 



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APPENDIX. 



By virtue of Her Majesty s Commission to inquire into the expenditure upon 
the Parliament and Departmental Buildings at Ottawa^ and other 
matters mentioned therein, tested the 2bth June, 1862, the following 
testimony was taken on oath as given by the severed witnesses sworn 
in that behalf, at Ottawa. 



4th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Victor Bourgeau, Esq., David Stark, Secretary. 

John Morris, swora says : 

I am an architect by profession, have been engaged at the profession since the year 1837. 
I came to this province in 1855. In 1856 I was employed by Mr. Thomas till the month 
of October, 1856, when I was employed as clerk of works in the University buildings, and 
continued there in that capacity until the 14th October, 1859, when I went to Quebec to 
explain the plans, to such contractors as wished to examine them with a view to contract- 
ing. I put in a letter of instructions dated 12th October, 1859, from Samuel Keefer, De- 
puty Commissioner (No. 1). On the morning of the 14th October, 1859, 1 called on 
Messrs. Fuller & Jones in Toronto, and from them I got one set of plans, which I took 
with me to Quebec, they are the same as were used, and I think attached to the contracts, 
and they were the plans shown to parties who wished to tender. These plans remained 
there till the day tenders were to be received, the 15th November, and I remained to ex- 
plain them. 

I saw Mr. McGreevy once or twice, but I had little conversation with him. A Mr. 
Gauvreau and another gentleman took the measurements for Mr. McGreevy j as I under- 
stood, they had free access to the plans. The questions and answers which are attached 
to the contract were exhibited with the plans, to parties desiring to contract; this was done 
that the same views should be presented to all parties alike, who desired information, and 
to prevent any misunderstanding regarding verbal communications on the subject. Dur- 
ing the mouth which intervened between the day for the delivery of the tenders, and the 
signing of the contract, I was engaged in preparing the schedule with the architects, which 
was to be appended to the contracts. These schedules were intended to show the prices 
at which the contractors were to be paid on their contract work, and were not intended to 
show the prices of extra work. The heading of the schedule was prepared before the ten- 
ders were delivered, and was intended to apply to contract and extra work, as is the usual 
practice. I was informed there was no schedule of prices attached to Mr. McGreevy's 
tender. I and the architects, directed by Mr. Keefer, Deputy Commissioner, prepared a 
schedule of prices for the progress estimates on the contract only, and the heading includ- 
ing both, was erroneously used; the direction given by Mr. Keefer was verbal only. 

Before the contracts were signed, but after the tenders were given in, on examining 
the plans of the Departmental buildings, I discovered that there was not the required ac- 
1 



camniodation, that the Provincial Secretary's Department had been altogether omitted, and 
also that the Customs and Auditor General's branches of the Finance Minister's Department 
had been placed in the wrong building. This I reported to Mr. Keefer personally, he 
replied the matter had then gone too far, and would require to be taken up at a subsequent 
period. I examined plans of the site which I found in the Department to see if the 
ground lines shown on the plans were the actual ground lines or assumed lines. I found 
the lines on the contract drawings were the assumed, not the real ground lines; this I also 
reported verbally to Mr. Keefer, pointing out to him that there would necessarily be large 
extras on the foundations, and in the depth of tho walls. Upon this I made a plan of the 
ground, from the plan I found in the office, and this plan was substantially correct as the 
ground was found. This plan was not attached to the contract although it was completed 
before the contract was signed. The plan attached to the contract, was the one showing 
the imaginary line of level. On the 12th December, my plan was adopted as the one by 
which the architects were to take the levels for each building, which of course entitled the 
contractor to extra or additional work, to the extent which the one differed from the 
other. The plan is put in marked A. I suggested an order book and prepared the form. 
One blank put in No. lj. I showed Mr. Keefer the draft of it, and he approved of it 
with one alteration, that it should bear the signature of the clerk of works, which my 
form did not. This was intended to prevent misunderstanding about what works had and 
had not been ordered. I also suggested that books should be printed with the con-tracts 
and specifications for easy reference. They were in progress when I left, but they did not 
contain the conditions attached to the specification. 

On the 13th December, 1859, I was appointed clerk of works for all the buildings, 
but my appointment dated from the 9th. 1 immediately went to Ottawa, and arrived there 
I think, on the 18th December, and reported myself according to instructions. The duty 
of clerk of works is to take order from the architects for the doing of works, to superin- 
tend those works, and to see that the material is good, and work done according to the 
specification. It is the duty of the contractors to set out the foundations, and to do the 
work under the superintendence of the architects and clerk of works, 

On my arrival at Ottawa I found the Parliament building partly staked out. The snow 
was deep, some stakes I think had been put in for the Departmental buildings. I did 
nothing more than see that they were in point of position, in accordance with the plan A, 
already put in. I was absent on leave for about three weeks, from the 20th or 21st De- 
cember, and on my return I found a little excavation had been done for the great tower 
and the hall. This excavation was stopped at the time 1 returned, and did not proceed 
again till the thaw in the spring, about the early part of April. The rock excavation un- 
der the contract proceeded from January during the winter. Soon after the rock excavation 
was commenced, I heard that tenders had been received for heating and ventilating the 
buildings, and soon after Mr. Garth came to Ottawa Avith the plans The precise time I 
do not remember, but I think it was about the 1st February, 1800. 

He was in communication with the architects, but I was in occasionally and there was 
some modification, I think, made. I laid out tl c boiler house, under whose orders \ cannot 
say, but it must have been one of the architects ; Mr. Garth was here at the time, and, I 
think, he left a tracing of his plan for heating and ventilating the buildings, but Mr. 
Keefer did not come till about the 10th of April. The contract plans on the Parliament 
Buildings assumed two feet of excavation to be necessary for all the work ; so far as the 
excavation exceeded two feet it was extra. About the 25th of February I received, 
from the Secretary of the Depaitment of Works, a letter of the 22nd, enclosing an order 
to Messrs. Fuller & Jones, the architects, which they had sent the Commissioner of 
Public Works forapproval. It was an order on Mr. McGreevy, the contractor, to exca- 
vate the grounds for the various foundations. I gave the order, as directed, to the archi- 
tects ; I think it ought to have been sent to them; I cannot explain why it was sent tome. 
The letter to me is No. 31,031, subject No. 1,026 of the Department. 

This order and a similar one for the Departmental buildings, are the orders upon 
which the excavation for the foundations were executed. I superintended the excavations 
alone under the directions of the architects. There is no useless or waste excavation of 



rock connected with the heating; and ventilation. Under the western wing and under 
part of the Legislative Chambers and smoking room, where the rock was excavated for the 
air ducts, the remaining rock was so loose and shattered, as to be unlit for foundations, and 
it had to be removed altogether It was more like boulders put together than beds of rock, 
but the top was smooth. No rock was unnecessarily removed, but in blasting for the 
boiler house it occasionally happened that a part of the solid rock was torn up, which had 
to be replaced by rubble work, where the walls were. There was some unuecessary exca- 
vation between the two wings, it was about 6 or 7 feet wide, of an average depth of 6 to 7 
feet. I cannot account for the error unless that the stakes got knocked down in the thaw. 
The rock taken for the foundations was thrown iu heaps, and such parts of it as were fit, 
wera built into the walls in the foundations, and the waste part is yet in heaps. 
The clay excavated from the west wing was used to fill up a ravine near the 
west end of the building. The eastern departmental building is about 3 feet 8 
inches lower in the ground than was originally contemplated. This saved a great 
deal of rock excavation under it. As it is, the chief extra work, is the rock 
excavation for the heating aud ventilating. 

In the foundation there is little extra excavation, and no unnecessary excavation was 
done there. There was extra earth excavation ; for on the southern part the rock was found 
13 feet from the surface, and the foundations went to the rock. The earth was trouble- 
some, and had to be removed to a spoil bank, and thence brought back for filling in. The 
depth was so great, that the trenches for the foundations had to be wide at top and slope 
mnch. This caused more excavation than if the depth had been less or the earth 
firmer than it was. The upper part was loose sand, the middle clay, and the 
bottom hard-pan full of water, so that it required pumping during the progress 
of the works. 

The ground on which the western departmental building stands, sloped from the north 
to the south so much, that the bottom of the foundation at the south end was but 17 
inches below the ground level, while that at the north was 14 feet below the ground level ; 
the first 9 feet clay, the last 5 feet rock. I do not know how much it fell short of, or 
exceeded the contract plan. There was no unnecessary work done there in the way of 
excavation. 

There were plans for the drains of the Parliament buildings in the original plans of 
the work, but no plan for drains for the Departmental buildings, but provision was 
made for their construction in the contracts, and the plans of these drains did not contem- 
plate the depth of the boiler houses ; the heating and ventilating apparatus which was 
made about ten feet lower than the bottoms of the originally contemplated drains. 
The consequence was the drains had to be excavated on levels lower than the bottoms 
of the boiler houses to prevent their being flooded with them. The deepening of these 
drains 10 feet was additional work. The drain of the Parliament building runs west from 
the boiler house through the ravine to the bank of the river on the west ; this, also, is the 
nearest to the building. The drain was put in this ravine, so far as it went, to prevent ex- 
cavatiou ; the excavation, till it c ime to the ravine, was chiefly rock. The excavation 
was more expensive then was contemplated, as the *pitch of the rock was against the run 
of the drain ; it disturbed two or three beds of the rock, this required the splitting of the 
beds, and making up the uneven bottom of the excavation with masonry. The boiler houses 
in the respective Departmental buildings are also 10 feet below the level of the contemplat:d 
drain, and caused the system of drainage to be 10 feet lower than was originally sup- 
posed. In the heating aud ventilating Mr. G-arth required most of the air ducts to come 
from the north ; advantage was taken of several of these to make the drains under the 
ducts, which saved the upper excavation, and this drain run into one from the Parliament 
building, which saved excavation so far as it went. The drain from the west Departmental 
building was made in a ravine running in a westerly direction from the boiler house to the 
bank ; this is the shortest drain as the ground fell towards the west; the slopes in the cross 
section of the drain were at the rate of 6 feet to 50 feet; this drain was expensive, as the 
bed of rock lay in an almost perpendicular direction, and the blasting was in the layers 
rather than in the beds, and the shots had little effect. The heating and ventilation were 
the cause of the chief part of the extra excavations,, and the mcieasod depth brought these 



e 

oxcavations into water which added to the expense. The course of these drains was pointed 
out to Mr. Kcefer on one of his visits — about the month of April, I860, and he approved 
f them. 



5th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C , Chairman, 
Victor Bourgeau, Esq., David Stark, Secretary. 

John Morris, — Examination continued. 

The drain was made under my supervision from plans furnished me by the 
architects ; they are made according to these plans, with slight alterations. I found, in 
the office of the Department at Quebec, plaus of the contour of the ground, from which I 
made the plan A, which I put in ; I found one plan, from which I worked, in the Assistant 
Engineer's room. I know of no other error or extravagance in the excavation than I have 
already spoken of. I have nothing further to say about excavation. I got plans from the 
architects of the Departmental buildings, on the same scale as the contract plans, 12 feet 
to au inch, but I got no plans showing the distances of the walls apart, and I had to work 
from the scale; the usual well-known rule is, that the architects should furnish the work- 
ing plans on which the distances between and the thickness of the walls are designated by 
figures, but these, as regards the Departmental buildings, I never got. I got one sectional 
plan of the front walls on a scale, I think, of half an inch to the foot. I laid out walls 
from the scale plan, but went over some of it carefully and figured it myself. I had laid 
out the eastern Departmental building so that the masonry was commenced on the 2nd 
April, 1860. There had been some men employed in stepping the trenches for one foun- 
dation as they were sloping so much from the character of the rock. The work was begun 
on one of the chief longitudinal walls. The mason work, during April, was confined 
mostly to the east departineutal building. In the meantime, during the early part of 
April, the excavation in the boiler house had been completed, and the trenches levelled. 
About the 23rd or 24th April I laid out one foundation of the library, and the masonry 
was commenced on the 26th April on the Parliament building, and I continued 
steadily on, giving the various points as the workmen required them. In May, I laid the 
boiler house, Legislative Council Chamber, and Picture Gallery, and rooms and adjoining 

In June the workmen proceeded on those parts, and during the month I laid out the 
main tower, and the east wing was begun. In July the workmen continued on the work 
so laid out. I had no assistance till the 19th April, when Mr. Hutchison came, and he 
was employed on the departmental buildings. I had no assistant on the Parliament build- 
ing till about the middle of June, when Mr. Grist came with Mr. Keefcr,and he continue 1 
on. I laid out the foundation walls of the centre of the Parliament building, the Library, 
the kitchen, the boiler house, central hall and tower, the halls under the Legislative 
Council Chamber and rooms adjoining, the walls under the Post Office, and front rooms 
east of the main tower, and the main lines of the east wing. These arc all the foundations 
I laid out, the rest were laid out, as I believe, under Mr. Grist. 

I applied for assistance on the 31st March, by letter, and I spoke to Mr. Keefer about 
it. I did not get any assistance till the times I have mentioned. The foundation plans 
for the Parliament building, which I got from the architects, were on a scale of 10 feet to 
an inch, but they were chiefly figured, so that I could easily lay out the walls. I had also 
sections and elevation plans on a large scale. From the foundation plans I got I laid 
out the walls, and I superintended the whole building ; but after July, I could not spend 
my whole time, as I was after that time in correspondence directly with the department ; 
I had besides the charge of the grounds. The correspondence was not private, it had 



5 



reference to the works and grounds. By the contract, the contractors had the right to 
make brick on any of the unlocated Ordnance lands. 

About the 16th January, Messrs. Jones & Haycock, had applied to me for part of 
the Ordnance lands to make brick. I sent their application to the department, and in reply 
received the letter of the department, dated the 23rd January, I860, (No. 30,536 of the 
department.) On receipt of this I communicated with Messrs. Jones & Haycock, and on 
the 1st of February, 1860, they applied to me for that portion of lot D, in concession C, of 
Nepcan, on the wc>st side of the doep cut of the Ridcau Canal, then occupied partly by one 
McDermot, Widow Healy and Richard McCann, with 600 feet of the spoil bank on the 
west side of the canal. 1 sent a copy of their application and my report upon it to the 
department on the 3rd February, 1860. I had no reply from the department, but a letter 
from Col. Coffin, of the 20th February, to say they could have what they applied for. 

On the 15th February, 1860, I had a letter from the department, (No. 30,934,) tell- 
ing me that a suggestion had been made to the department for facing the Parliament and 
Deyartmental buildings with sandstone throughout, and that estimates for the difference 
had been submitted. I was requested to furnish the Commissioner of Public Works, con- 
fidentially, with my views ; first, as to to the quality of the Nepean and Templeton sand- 
stone, its architectural effect, and durability as compared with limestone. Second, my 
opinion as to the difference of cost. In answer to this I reported my opinions and views 
to the department on the 22nd February, 1860. It is printed in the Blue Book, page 259. 

I received about the 25th March, 1860, a letter from the department of the 23rd 
March, (No. 31,366 of the department,) directing me to furnish as soon as possible, a 
schedule of the prices upon which the extra work of the new building should in my opin- 
ion be returned and paid for in the progress estimates. To this date no extra work had 
been returned. I mention this extra work thrown upon me, not as affecting my duty as 
clerk of works, till July, after which it did, as I shall have occasion to show, but the real 
difficulty with respect to the foundations arose from the fact, that the foundation plans ot 
the building had no reference to the heating and ventilation, and the heating and ventilat- 
ing plans had not sufficient regard to the requirements of the buildings. They had not 
been conceived by one mind, nor had they been blended in any way to give unity to them. 
Mr. Grarth had tracings of the plans of the buildings to work by, but in carrying out his 
own views, he had gone through the walls, without reference to openings for doors, fire- 
places, piers or foundations of any kind; leaving the architects and me to adopt them as 
far as possible under existing requirements. 

Some of the plans for heating and ventilating were given me about the 1st April, and 
the rest of the tracings came to me about the 26th. The interlacing of the building plans 
created much confusion and uncertainty; the heating and ventilating required other and 
additional walls, and it doubled at least the work of the architects and myself, and resulted 
in the difference between the walls as intended and those found on the ground, and this 
applies alike to all the buildings. I cannot say what the amount of additional work is 
between the contract and the work actually done. There were compound extras in fact 
in this way. All Mr. Garth's work was extra, but in working out his plaus, there were 
extras to them from the inequalities in the rock, and rock excavations, and all was addi- 
tional work from between the supposed foundation lines and the actual foundation lines. 
I repeat it more explicitly. All the foundations I laid out were the library, kitchen, pic- 
ture gallery, and rooms adjoining, central court and boiler house, principal entrance hall 
and main tower, the Legislative Council chamber, and rooms adjoining, the front rooms 
east of the main tower, and I gave the direction of the outer walls of the east wiug, but 
none of its inner and cross walls, and I laid out the walls under the reading room of the 
Legislative Assembly. 

By reference to the plans it will appear that what I laid out, are not thicker than they 
ought to be, with a few exceptions, which arose in this way. When a foundation wall 
was required, and a wall for an air duct, and they approach each other within a foot or 
fifteen inches, the wall would be made solid ; an instance of this appears in the middle of 
the front of the east wing, another near the Speaker's entrance to the Legislative Council, 
and others in places in the angles of tjie towers, in the north end of the Legislative Council 



and Legislative Assembly chambers, also in the main tower, and under the staircases, and 
' staircase to the Library, but I do not know how they were measured. It was easier to make 
the wall solid than to have built up the separate walls, and faced them. It ought in 
strictness not to have been allowed as solid, but it is not unusual to allow it as solid to 
compensate the contractors for other trouble. 

I have acted on this principle in England. The walls under the Legislative Assem- 
bly arc thicker than was intended. Mr. McG rccvy asked me to allow him to make them 
thicker to get rid of the large blocks of stone, which had come from the foundation, and I 
allowed it on the understanding it was not to be measured as extra. I instructed Mr. 
Grist to measure these walls as if they had been according to contract thickness. All the 
inundations I had out are not an inch wrong in the subsequent work. I see on looking at 
the plan two walls under the Legislative Council chamber leading to the hot air chamber, 
which I did not put in ; they arc thicker than necessary, perhaps a foot. 

The wall of the boiler house, under the Legislative Council chamber, was built against 
the blasted rock, and was in some places thicker than others \ it was made solid to the 
rock, and a fair average thickness allowed. The main tower is projected nine feet farther 
n front of the building than was shown on the original plan. The plan of this as it is, I 
got in May when the tower was laid out. It improved the external appearance, and the 
internal arrangements; which would make extras and deductions. It made provision for 
water and snow getting from the roof. I think as far as I laid the work, there is neither 
waste nor extravagance about it. 

The supervision on this work was not sufficient, there ought to have been two more. 
I measured the work and certified the progress estimates until I got assistance, and then 
Mr. Grist and the other assistants did the measurements, and I applied more to the gen- 
eral supervision, but to have done it properly two more would have been necessary; this 
, i rose from the increased work caused by heating and ventilating flues, air ducts, openings 
and arching. 

When I applied for assistants, it would be a month or months sometimes before they 
came. All sorts of influence were brought to bear to get people in. Mr. Hutchison came 
on the 19th April; Mr. Grist about the middle of June ; and Mr. Pelham on the 11 th 
July ; and they ought all to have been at the works by the 1st of May. These were all I 
ever had. Two of the three were efficient, and I should myself have appointed them, if 
1 had known them as I did ; the other I might have taken, but I should have arranged 
their duties differently, but efficient as they were, they were not half enough for the work. 
I account for the increased size of the buttresses on the Library by au arrangement with 
Mr. Keefer, and the architects, but all they were to be enlarged was six inches all round, 
and afterwards a foot in front. These were set out in my absence and I cannot tell why 
they are too large. I know they are too large. I set out the work on top of the founda- 
tions with the assistance of Mr. Jones, architect. I do not know whether it was allowed 
or not, the foundation walls in the front and sides of the wings are larger than the con- 
tract plaus show. There was no basement then, but by an order from the Department of 
the 12 th December, 1.859, as I understood, basements were to be put in these wings, and 
windows made. In consequence of this change these foundations are larger. 

I do not know why these foundation walls are scveu feet, by tlu alteration they ou_ch 
t ) be five feet six inches ; I did not lay these out, I gave the general outline only ; I sup- 
pose the contractor with Mr. Grist did it, but I do not know ; I cannot account for it. I 
did not lay out the end and back walls of the east wing, and I cannot account for their 
extra size. I think it was necessary to have the foundations of the tower solid ; the con- 
tract plaus only show what the work was to be at the level of the floor ; the contract plans 
do not show the foundation walls or their thickness, they show only the thickness of the 
wall to be set in the foundation. I never had any foundation plan; I had to infer what 
the foundations were to be from the walls which were to be set upon them ; this only was 
shewn by the contract plans. The rule in the profession, an I understand, is not so much 
to furnish foundation plaus as to mark with lines the ground plan, so as to show the intend- 
ed size of the foundation, but I had neither; I do not think it absolutely necessary. The 
specification describes the footings of the walls as they are to be inferred from the contra 



plan, and to such of them as I made iu conformity with it. I think, so long as the ground 
floor plan shows the foundations as they ought to be there is no rule requiring a founda- 
tion plan. With reference to the foundations under the stairs being solid, I think, that if 
the walls had not been solid there would have been but two well holes of about 2 feet 6 
inches by 5 feet, and 2 feet G inches by 7 feet ; it was easier to build it solid, and gave it 
more room for the work above. It sometimes happens that it is easier and cheaper for the 
contractor to build solid work than two walls, in cases where it makes no difference in 
point of utility, it is usual to allow it to be solid, but in su -h cases, in 
strictness the deduction shoul.l be made of what was intended to be open. 1 ordered the 
foundations under the stairs to be made solid. I thought that as it was to be paved and 
concrete under the pavement it would have made little difference. The projection from 
the work under the stairs is for a hydrant. Around the boiler house, in the centre of the 
principal building the wall is not too thick, it is intended to put the roof on it independent 
of the wall, that in case of any explosion the roof may not be held by the wall. The 
soIidVwall under the staircases in the public hall is built solid, because I thought it was 
cheaper than to arch it. 

The air ducts were made of pick-faced masonry, because Mr. Garth required a smooth 
wall as part of his scheme, and it was made so accordingly ; afterwards, and after a corres- 
pondence about it, he admitted that rubble masonry would do if the area were wider, but 
on the Parliament building all the material had been prepared, but the Departmental 
buildings are of rubble work outside the buildings ; all inside and 30 feet at the outlets 
the masonry ot the air ducts is to be dressed work. As regards the boiler house, I have 
not considered whether brick would have been better or not, I incline to an opinion against 
it. It required a solid wall for the wall above ; other and rougher masonry might have 
done, but it would not have accorded with works of this class ; they are 3 feet G inches o-i 
the two sides, besides the filling in to the rock, which would make it six or seven feet, it 
is a contract wall, with a foot added. The north wall is 3 feet; it was to have been 2 feet; 
the south wall is 4 feet thick; this was required for the seating of the marble steps which 
were to lie on it ; the wall above is 2 feet G inches by the contract. I do not know who 
ordered the work at the boiler house and air ducts to be of picked masonry; I do not 
think there ever was a working order ; it seemed to be agreed to have it so at a conference 
between Mr. Keefer, Deputy Commissioner, the architects, and Mr. Garth ; I so under- 
stood it. On the contract plan there is a small flue in the south-east corner, but Mr. 
Garth said it was too small, it was made an air flue ; and in the north part of the boiler 
house a large tower was placed to carry off smoke and vitiated air, it is 15 feet square out- 
side ; this is extra work, and has been carried up as high as the building. The ordinary 
tire-places and flues were not done away with on the introduction of Mr. Garth's plan, 
they are made as the original contract plan required, only changing them where they inter- 
fered with his scheme ; this made extra work. I do not know why the ordinary chimneys 
were not dispensed with ; I had no orders about them; there are about 200 of them in all the 
buildings. I knew nothing whatever about the heating and ventilating, or why the other 
chimneys were made. There are no means of taking out or putting iu new boilers for 
heating the buildings, those now there were built there and so would others have to be in 
case of being required. The original plan of the Departmental buildings did not contem- 
plate rooms in front in the basement story, but an order was made about the 12th Decern 
ber, 1859, to have rooms made in these basement stories, to light which area walls were 
required, which were not iu the original plan or estimate. Whether it would have been 
wiser to have raised the buildings higher out of the ground than they are, is a matter 
upon which I can offer no opinion. 



8 



6th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 



JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Botjrgeau. 



John Morris, — Examination continued. 



According to the specification the foundation 
larger at least than the walls from the basement 
might 



walls 



y 
on 



were to be built 9 inches 
in some cases the architects 
order more, but when the foundation is on rock it is not so necessary 
to give footings to the walls as in earth or clay. The rubble masonry, where it is rubble, 
is to be of the same class all through, but I still think that even on a rock foundation it is 
better to have a wider base than the wall above ; in no instance, to my knowledge, are my 
walls in excess of the specification. [Note — When Mr. Morris is questioned in detail res- 
pecting certain foundation walls in the east wing, which are in excess of the specification, 
he denies that he laid them out; he gave, he said, the general line of the building. To 
prevent the possibility of misunderstanding hereafter, in regard to the detail of 
the work laid out by him, he now marks all the walls he laid out, by chalking with a black 
cross, each wall.] I have now marked, on' the plan B on linen, with a black cross all the 
walls which I laid out. In reference again to the library, the inner circular wall is one 
foot thicker than on the plan ; this arose from the number of air flues which Mr. Garth's 
plan rendered necessary ; I can only account for its being made larger by me, by suppos- 
ing I got a verbal order from the architects. I think the Deputy Commissioner was con- 

of which I have spoken, 
10th April. I did lay it out so. The buttresses are not 
they are I believe in excess of what I laid out. I do not 
do not hold myself responsible for the 
the work was measured by Mr. Grist 

properly, 
taken out 



measure- 



approxi- 

In the winter it 

of my hands, and 



suited about this alteration at the general conference about drains 
some time near the 
as I laid them out 
know who made the difference. I 
ments of the progress estimates, 

mately only ; we were overworked and could not do it 
was intended to be gone over, but after we began it was 

I have had nothing more to do with it. In regard to the walls which Mr. McGreevy re- 
quested should be made thicker, I directed that in measuring them, they should be mea- 
sured as contract walls. I do not know how it was done. In reference to the d-ains I 
suggest edtheir direction to Mr. Keefer, he directed their dimensions, and the kind of 
masonry both outside and inside the building. The air ducts were made according 1o 
Mr. Garth's system and plan. Mr. Keefer saw these plans and sanctioned the work in 
the air ducts and boiler house. I think the errors in laying out the foundations arose 
possibly from not having figured plans, but a good deal more I think from having the 
contract plan and Mr. Garth's plan interlacing each other, and from the want of proper 
assistance and supervision. I had the power given to me verbally by Mr. Keefer, Mr. 
Garth assenting, to deviate from the plans of Mr. Garth where they interfered with the 
stability of the building. The external walls generally are laid out correctly; it is in the 
division walls between the rooms where the errors are. I cannot say it arose from want 
of figuring. I think when the clerk of works sees any difficulty about laying out the work 
from the plans, it is his duty to apply to the architect for explanation. I understand the 
rule of the profession to be that the clerk of works represents the interests of the person 
for whom the work is being done, that he is to take his orders from the architect and see 
that the work is properly done, and in the absence of the architects to represent their 
powers with reference to the works. 

In laying out the foundations, the clerk of works co-operates with the foreman of the 
contractors in laying out the work. I think it is as much the duty of the foreman to see 
that he is not doing work inconsistent with the contract as it is the duty of the clerk of 
works, and if work is done erroneously or unnecessarily, the loss should fall on the con- 
tractor. I understand the rule also to be that the architect in a complicated building 



should check the work, and see that it is not being erroneously done. Iu regard to these 
buildings, the plans lay iu common in an unlocked room during the day for reference to 
he contractors, architects and clerks of works. As regards the duty of architects, I think 
they are not expected to employ any one on the works Their supervision is performed by 
themselves or their office staff, and their orders may be wholly in writing to the clerk of 
works, without personal communication ; they are expected to supervise the work, and the 
responsibility at last rests on them that the work is done properly. In England on build- 
ings such as churches, or public edifices not belonging to the government, the practice is 
to pay so much when certain stages of the work are completed, or when that is not so, the 
architects gives certificates that work to a certain value has been performed, and on that 
payments are made to the contractor. In government works, the architects do not mea- 
sure the work in progress or give progress estimates, the government appoint surveyors 
independently of the architects whose duty it is to measure and certify, and on their mea- 
surement and certificate payments are made. 

In this country the practice of the Department of Public Works, bears harder on 
architects and clerks of works, who are required to measure the work in progress monthly, 
and to make out and sign progress estimates, on which advances are made to the contrac- 
tors. These progress estimates are usually approximate estimates, and not conclusive, but 
they give additional work to the architects and clerks of works. 



7 th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Adjournment was made to measure the building for covering for the winter 



8th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

John Morris, — Examination continued. • 

In looking at the contract plans and the sections of the walls showing the footings, I 
should say that it was intended to have the footing of the walls one foot in height, and by 
the specification it was to be at least 9 inches wider than the walls; there was no necessity 
in the rock foundation to carry the footing higher than a foot, any footing on a wall 
beyond this on a level foundation, I should call superfluous. 

In a sloping foundation, the footing migrt be stepped, but I think it would be at the 
discretion of the architect to carry out the footing to the level even if it were an extra. 
None of the plans show that the footing of the walls was to exceed one foot, where no 
batter is shown the walls above the footing should be of the same thickness as tLe wall 
above, and the plans show this to have been intended. 



10 



When the wall is battering, the foundation is properly carried up, of the thickness 
shown by section at the bottom. I know of no reason why a foundation wall on a slope 
should not be stepped, but if I were an architect, I should properly use my discretion in 
not stepping it, without any fear of its being called an error in judgment. As clerk of 
works, if not otherwise directed, I should not think I was doing anything wrong if I did 
not step the footing. The work I laid out 1 took from the plans without special directions 
from the architects. There was scarcely anything done without conference with them. 
I think there was a proper understanding iu this respect. I stated^that, during the month 
which intervened between the receiving of the tenders and the execution of the contracts, 
I was preparing schedules of prices for progress estimates. These schedules were neces- 
sary, as I was informed that no schedule of prices had been attached to the tender of Mr. 
McGreevy. I had distributed blank schedules to any one who called for blank tenders, 
as I considered them as part of the tender, and if I had had to do with the acceptance of 
the tenders, I should not have received a tender without such aschedule; but, on referring 
to this, Mr. McGreevey informed me that the notice did not require the schedule, and his 
tender in fact had no schedule of prices. These schedules I did not prepare alone ; the 
architects were with me, — Mr. Fuller for some time, and Mr. Stent all the time. These 
were prepared in a great hurry, I am not sure but on the same day. Two, or perhaps 
three teuders, having schedules attached, were lent to us by the secretary from a locked 
drawer in which they all were j these were the tenders of Mr. Worthington of Toronto, and 
Messrs. Elliott & Melville, "of Hamilton ; the other one we took no notice of. We con- 
sidered these as fair low tenders ; and, taking them in round numbers at £112,000, aud 
McG reevey's at £76,000, without the fireproofing, we reduced the prices in detail of their 
schedules, and made one applicable to Mr. McG-reevey's. Mr. Stent had the quantities in 
detail of one of the Departmental buildings, and with a view to check the correctness of 
the schedule, we applied them to these quantities, and found that it came within £500 of 
the contract price on that building. The prices on the Parliament buildiug were applied 
in the same ratio, as near enough for progress estimates. We were distinctly instructed 
by the Deputy Commissioner that the schedule was to apply only to the contract work. I 
think there was no reason then assigned for this. I was present afterwards when Mr. 
Bernard, the chief clerk in the Attorney General's Office, brought in the draft of the con- 
tract. On hearing it read, I observed that no provision was made for extra or additional 
work ; he said no, that in the conditions attached to the specification, these were provided 
for. I put in now the original specifications and conditions which were in my 
charge in Quebec, to show any one who was desirous of contracting ; they 
arc marked No. 2 ; it is lithographed, and the one attached to the^ contract was 
another copy of the same so far as I know. There was no plan or specification 
in the Parliament building made for constructing drains beyond certain points 
all beyond remained as extra or additional. I refer to the plan showing how far these 
drains went; it is a small original plan marked B ; its own number is No. 1. I refer also to 
the specification for these drains, page 14. The plan from which I made p!an II had the 
heights of Barrack Hill at different points from the sill of the guard lock at the entrance 
of the Rideau Canal. The height of the rock at the north-west angle of the library is 
159 feet 1 inch ; near the centre of the principal tower in front, 159 feet 1 inch; the low- 
est point between them is 154 feet; near the western angle in front, 148 feet 5 inches; ih i 
east corner 142 feet; the north-east angle of east wing 150 feet 5 inches; the north erg 
angle of the Speaker of the Legislative Council's room, 155 feet; the north-west corner of 
west wing 153 feet; the north-west corner of Speaker's room, Legislative Assembly, 157 
feet 5 inches; the south-east point of the library wall 157 feet 7 inches. When I found 
this plan, during the month which intervened between the receiving of the tenders and 
the signing of the contracts, I directed the attention of the Deputy Commissioner to the 
fact that the sites of the buildings were not level, and told him there would be large 
extras. I had been running the thing over in my mind, and when I spoke to him I 
showed him that if the level of 159 feet was assumed, there would be increased founda- 
tion walls in all the eastern part of the building, and in the south-west part of the west 
wing ; that if the level of 157 were adopted, it would save the wall, but would make a 
great deal of rock excavation. Having pointed out this to him, he said it would be better 
to adopt the higher level of 159. This was all before the contract was signed. It seemed 



11 



to me strange, that, having the actual levels, these were not given to the architects. I also 
called the attention of the Deputy Commissioner to the site of the eastern Departmental 
building ; the rock there was nearly level, aud the ground lines there were properly shown 
as level. Then I spoke of the western Departmental building ; the slope there is six 
feet, which is properly shown on the eastern front of that building ; the ground line on 
the southern front slopes 3 feet 7 inches. 

The north west angle of the eastern Departmental building is 136 feet. The north 
east angle of the western Departmental building is 152 feet 4 inches, On considering these 
levels, the Deputy Commissioner directed that the western Deptartmeutal building should 
be sunk 4 feet, at the north east angle, and that the eastern Departmental building should 
be raised 3 feet 8 inches out of the ground. 

All these levels I have spoken of were the ground surface, not the rock, excepting 
where the rock cropped out at the west wing of the Parliament building, and the north 
west corner of the Library. It was presumed that what would be saved in the eastern 
Departmental building would equal the additional work on the west Departmental building. 
The Deputy Commissioner had no means then of knowing where the actual surface of the 
rock was, nor had I. It would have been proper to have caused pits to be dug to ascertain 
the position of the rock surface. Its position should have been furnished the architects 
before they made the contract plans, or time given to the architects to ascertain it. From 
the mouth of July, 1860, my time was chiefly occupied with work done for the Depart- 
ment, so that I had little time to attend to the buildings. I went occasionally round the 
works. 

Mr. Grist acted as clerk of works on the Parliament building ; Hutchison on 
the eastern Departmental building, and Pelhain on the western Departmental 
building. From the 21st December, 1859, I had charge of the Barrack Hill, and all 
the buildings there, also Major's Hill with the ground attached. The care of these 
occupied a portion of my time. On the 9th September, 1859, I was requested to inquire 
into the character ot the materials available in the vicinity of Ottawa for the public build- 
ings. After making some examination, I reported my views on the 4th October. 

The buildings had not commenced when, on the 15th February, 1860, I received the 
letter, No. 30934, requesting me to state my views, first as to the quality of the Nepean 
and Templeton stone, its effect and durability as compared with the Tcmpleton, and secondly 
my opinion as to the difference of cost. On the 22nd February, I reported. 

My report is published in the Blue Book, page 259. I have no knowledge of the 
change from limestone to the Nepean stone. I believe tlie Nepean stone is far more dur- 
able than the limestone, and desirable in case of fire, and the colour is more agreeable. 

I thought 21 cents a foot in the face of the wall would be the difference of cost, but I 
afterwards found it was not enough. The quarry from which the first came, and upon 
which my estimate was based, belonged to Augustus Keefer, Mr. Bishop, and Mr. Wilson. 
These parties got into difficulty, and the working of the quarry was stopped. Afterwards 
the contractors opened quarries of their own, about two miles and a quarter further distant 
from the city. The stone is as good from the one as the other, but the bed of the latter 
quarry is not so good, and requires more dressing than the other. 

The Brockville stone used in the building was used at the instance of the contractor, 
who was at liberty to use it if he pleased, subject to the approbation of the architects, by 
the terms of the specification. The Brockville stone was disused because it could not be 
supplied in sufficient quantities, and some of it was defective. The difference of cost be- 
tween the limestone, as contemplated by the contract, and the work as done, is 19 cents a 
foot as in the wall, or 21 cents cubic ; I estimate the wall to be 10 inches in the facing. 
I think it is double the work to prepare Nepean stone to limestone. The Nepean stone in. 
the quarry was $1.25 a toise of 216 feet ; the block stone the same as in Gloucester j my 
estimates are not made from actual test, but as my opinion. 



12 



9th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q, C, Caairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau, 

John Mokris, — Examination continued. 

While I was employed at the University buildings, Toronto, about the middle of 
August, 1859, Mr. Rubidge called on me and asked me to go and see Mr. Keefer, the 
Deputy Commissioner, who was then in the old Parliament building at Toronto. I went 
down and met Mr. Keefer ; he said he would have but little time to examine the com- 
peting designs, and asked me to cube three of them. I had three or four hours a day to 
spare, and I ascertained the cubic contents of the three designs. 

These were the design of the Parliament buildings by Messrs. Fuller & Jones, the 
designs b}^ Stent & Laver, and that of Cumberland & Storm. By my returns the 
cubic contents cf the first' were 3,600,000 cubic feet, the next 3,000,000, the last ,500,000. 
This was the mode by which I understood Mr. Keefer was going to determine th irrelative 
cost. From my knowledge of the University building, with which I was well acquainted, 
its design being similar, I estimated the cost of the first I examined at £150,000; the next I 
do not remember estimating ; but the last at about £130,000 or £135,000. These estimates 
I stated to Mr. Keefer, who said he thought I must be mistaken, for there was a tender in 
to do the first at £75,000, the sum appropriated. That of Stent & Laver was about two 
thirds of the size of the other, and would have cost in proportion, for the style was similar. 
I formed my opinion of the value of the buildings in the estimate I then made, partly from 
my experience here and works in England. In the report I made about materials on the 
4th October, 1859, 1 suggested the difficulty of getting bricks sufficient ; and, to prevent the 
contractors from being at the mercy of brickmakers, I recommended that Ordnance lands 
unleased should be allowed them to make brick ; and this order was given. So far as Mr. 
Garth's plan showed the system of heating and ventilating, the air ducts were to be brick. 
I do not know of any particular order in reference to the change from brick to stone for 
these ducts, but I understood from the architects that they were to be stone, and I direct- 
ed the contractors to make them of the class of masonry they now are. Mr. Keefer was 
here in April before they were begun, and I understood he then approved of the change ; 
he certainly never objected to them at any subsequent visit. I examined the system of 
heating and ventilating which the contract plans showed in all the buildings, and I con- 
sidered them amply sufficient, except in the Legislative Council Chamber, and Legislative 
Assembly Chamber, and very little alteration would have remedied any defect in 
these chambers. I suggested to the Deputy Commissioner that the mode of heating 
the buildings should be definitely settled before the contracts were signed. He 
said he did not think it would alter the buildings, and it would cause delay in 
waiting to do it. Before the advertisement was issued calling for tenders for heating and 
ventilating (copy in Blue Book, page 23), I was sent for by Mr. Keefer to ask my opinion 
as to whether the advertisement was sufficient. I found it provided only for heating, and I 
suggested the clause now found in it requiring specifications and detailed drawings. 

I think the ground lines adopted were the best that could be under all circumstances. 
I remember Mr. Garth saying when he saw the stones prepared for the ducts, that he 
wished the surface smooth, and the joints close ; he even suggested pointing the cold air 
ducts. I never received any definite instructions from the architects or any one else as 
to my duties on these works, or instructions of any kind, until a change was made in the 
month of June, 1861, when my duties were limited to part of. the Parliament building. 
The architects were on the building every day, often twice a day, when they were in the 
city. Sometimes they might be absent a day or more. Messrs. Stent & Laver lived in 
town from the commencement of the works. Messrs. Fuller & Jones lived in Toronto at 



18 



the commencement of the works, but came here early in the spring of 1860. Before they 
came to live here, their visits were but occasional, but after they came, they were on the 
buildings as much as architects usually are who have practice elsewhere. The duty of 
architects on buildings like these is very much in their own discretion, but they certainly 
ought to have seen that no mistakes were made in laying out the foundations, and that the 
general character and quality of the work were such as they ought to be. Their authority 
is supreme on the buildings, and their responsibility is equal to their power. I took the 
measurements of all the excavation, including rock for foundations, drains, and air ducts, 
from the commencement till June, 1860. They were put in a book by me, which Mr. 
Grist got from me. I heard afterwards it had been lost. The depths and widths were ac- 
curately taken, but he could not in the rapid progress of th,e work very well distinguish 
between contract work and extra work. It was intended to make these calculations in the 
winter when we had time. For this purpose, I desired the other clerks of works to make 
sections and plans, and take the measurements carefully. The progress estimates were 
made out from these. I was not directed by any one to prepare these plans ; I did it be- 
cause I wished to keep a check upon the measurements. The architects did not measure 
the work for the progress estimates. I made the measurements until I had assistant 
clerks of works ; then they made them, and I sometimes assisted them in making out the 
bill of quantities from their measurements. 

I do not remember that the architects ever made any remarks while the foundations 
were in progress, whether they were properly or improperly built. The assistant clerks 
of works were to get their instructions from me. I gave them no written instructions. 1 
directed them to attend chiefly to the quality of the work, and instructed them to make 
plans of the depths of their measurements. They were not taken off to my knowledge to 
any other work than the superintendence of the buildings, and the plans I have spoken 
of. I did not get these clerks of works when I asked for them ; and, when they did come, 
it took them some time to get acquainted with the plans. I cannot tell why plans, the 
cost of which was so far in excess of the appropriation, were adopted. When I first ex- 
amined the plans of Mr. Garth for heating and ventilating, 1 saw that the preparation 
merely for the system of heating and ventilating would create an enormous cost, and I told 
Mr. Keefer this. I subsequently told the Deputy Commissioner that the air ducts would 
cost £60,000. 

On the 15th January, 1861, I was requested in writing by Mr. Page to make memor- 
anda and suggestions connected with the buildings, and with works directly or indirectly 
connected therewith, including bells and speaking tubes, gas and water service, floors, 
fire-proof roofs, marbles, main drains, and sewers, additional foundation walls, drain to 
east wing of Parliament building, woods, and brief description of progress. These, with 
pointing out the buildings, occupied me in the winter, during which I had intended to 
check the measurements of the works then done. I would here remark that I called the 
attention of Mr. Rose, the Chief Commissioner, to the cost of the ventilation when he came 
up. By the specification attached to the contract, provision was made for chases to be 
left for all soil or other pipes. No plan of these was ever given, although in my report, 
before any walls were built, this was urged upon the Department. The consequence will 
be, that great extra, expense will be incurred in making these chases for water pipes, bell 
pipes, speaking tubes, whenever they are put in the building; and the cutting required for 
them will damage and mar the walls. 



14 



nth AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C. Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

John Morris, — Examination continued. 

There were no tests applied to try the durability of the stone originally 
contemplated, nor the stone actually used. There was an advertisement for samples 
of stone, and many were sent in, but no specific examination made. From an 
examination of the rock at Gloucester, and from the texture of the stone in 
Nepean, I was satisfied of their durability. I never had any difficulty with contractors 
themselves, but I have had with the foremen. I never ordered or set out walls thicker 
than the plan warranted. I found them built thicker afterwards, when they came to be 
uncovered after the winter, and I was astonished to see them so j I cannot account for 
their being so thick ; my impression is that the walls were set out by the foreman and not 
checked, but I was not present and cannot say. The order for making the foundation to 
the rock was from the architects, countersigned by me, dated 14th February, 1860. There 
were times when the contractors did not get constructive drawings and detailed drawings 
generally j there was a complaint from the contractors of the Departmental Buildings, in 
writing, to me ) I sent it to Messrs. Stent & Laver; I do not recollect that Mr. McGreevy 
complained much j the other contractors did complain ; whether they had cause or not 
I do not know ; 1 think they had reasons, for I remember the centre part of the eastern 
Departmental Building being one foot above the sills of the lower windows until the sides 
were 15 feet or more higher. As the main tower in the Parliament Building was originally 
planned, there were two sets of doors in the entrance hail, with expensive carvings and 
finishings j as it now is, there is but one door ; this is what I spoke of as a deduction from 
the extras which the change otherwise caused. In the specification of the Departmental 
Buildings reference is made to a sample wall. (Blue Book, page 101). I understood a 
sample wall had been built, but when I came it was down j I caused a sample wall to be 
built in the spring of 1860 ; it was what I required as a compliance with the specification; 
the contractors neither admitted nor protested against its being a specimen wall, but the 
first parts of the walls were built according to it; the upper parts of the walls are not so 
good. I think the cross bonding of the walls is good, so far as I had charge of them ; 
the iron bonding was put in so long as I had to do with the front walls, but was after- 
wards discontinued j I do not know why. On the 28th May, 1861, I received a letter 
from the Deputy Commissioner, which I put in, (No. 3), and on the, 1st June, 1861, a 
letter from the architects (No. 4) ; accompanying this letter was a tracing marked (C), 
showing that my services were to be confined to the library and to that part of the build- 
ing set apart for the Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly. From the early part 
of July, 1860, 1 was engaged in making preparations for his Royal Highness the Prince 
of Wales to lay the foundation stone, and I could not look after the buildings any more 
that season. Nearly all the west wing was set out in September, while I was away. I 
generally had to ask for instructions from the architects ; after this I superintended the 
building of the outer wall of the library ; I discontinued my services in October, 1861. 
Last fall about seventy feet of the cornice fell, for want of cramps, and was injured ; I 
spoke to Mr. Larose and told him it was for want of cramps. He said he did' not know 
he had power to order them. I said he had. Cramps were put in, but the cornice is now 
imperfect from the breaking. There is a part of the western Departmental Building with 
the cornice imperfect. I know that Messrs. Stent & Laver were lime merchants, and sup- 
plied the contractors for the Departmental Buildings, along with other lime dealers, with 
lime for these buildings. It is usual both in England and this Province to attach to tenders 
and contracts schedules of prices ; these schedules]onght to represent, and usually do rcpre- 



15 



sent, the prices at which the contract has been taken, and are intended to be used in esti- 
mating deductions us well as extra work j they are not used for the purpose of progress 
estimates only, for they had their origin where progress estimates are not known. They 
are not safe for progress estimates without testing their application, for the amount of the 
contract might be drawn while the work was in progress, if they were used without such 
test. In making out the schedule to attach to Mr. McGreevy's contract, there were no 
tests used to ascertain the correctness of the schedules. 

During the progress of the work Mr. Rose, the Chief Commissioner, visited the works 
three times. The first was when the first sod was turned in December, 1859 ; the next 
early in July, 1860; and again v.ith the Prince. Mr. Keefer seven or eight times : First, 
when the sod was turned; again in April, 18C0; October, 1860; also in May, 1861. He 
examined the works at these visits. Mr. Rubidge was with Mr. Keefer in May, 1861. I 
do not remember any other visits than these. I received from the Department of Public 
Works, a letter on the 13th December, 1859, 11th April, 1860,17th April, 1860, 16th 
May, 1861. The first time I was absent was on leave, after the Prince was here, and Mr. 
Pelham and Hutchison on the Departmental buildings, and Mr. Grist on the Parliament 
building did my duty. The contractors were stopped a few minutes every hour in blast- 
ing ; perhaps 100 or 150 men were stopped. This occurred during the first year. I know 
the brick walls were not built simultaneously with the stone walls, but I do not know why ; 
they were not under my charge. In the winter of 1860-61, a large quantity of brick was 
brought to the ground, which 1 had assorted, the soft by themselves, which were rejected. 
There were about 200,000. I do not know the precise quantity. They were to have been 
taken off the ground in the spring. I believe, however, they were used in the building 
afterwards. At a later time, in the fall of 1861, 1 saw brick of a very bad quality being 
built. They were not to be used where I was, but I objected to them to Mr. McGreevy, 
and told him they were of a class of brick which were not taken the year before. He 
replied if such brick were insisted on, it would take ten years to finish the buildings. The 
walls which are found overhanging the basement walls arose from "the foundations being 
wrong. The surplus wall is useless. The enlarged plan, to be used for the first story, did 
not correspond with the foundations, and were made as I believe to suit them as far as 
possible, but they are neither in fact exactly the contract plan. 

If the bricks had been according to the specification, a few might have given way, but 
not the great quantity which have, and which were not sound when put in. With refer- 
ence to the duties charged upon me by the letter of the 28th May, 1861, wherein I was 
told my duties would be confined to practical supervision, I say it was utterly impossible 
for me to see that none but the best class of material was used, and the work throughout 
well executed, to make measurements of all work performed, and keep time of men 
employed upon the works, both contract and extra, and such other memoranda in relation 
thereto as the architects may deem necessary and expedient, when in fact Mr. McGreevy 
had, for the sole purpose of keeping time, two men constantly employed on the Parliament 
building. 

The measurements of the works grew upon me ; at first little was required ; as the 
works increased, I still measured for the progress estimates. I did not know whether the 
architects were of right to do it, but they never did do it, and when it was required of 
them, they alleged that they were not to do it, and the best proof of it was, that they 
never yet had done so. I never received over $1200, but on the 19th August, 1861, Mr. 
Larose received $1400, although he never did one fifth of the work. Messrs. Bowes, 
Pattison and Hutchinson had $1200, and Mr. Pelham $1000. 

On the plan marked D I have drawn a black line around those portions of the build- 
ing, the foundation of which I set out. I set out the footings of the walls except those 
walls from 1 to 9 inclusive. I did not set them out. A plan showing the levels of the 
ground, which I saw in the office of the Department, is not here, but I speak from a trac- 
ing of it. The water closets at each end of the public hall are removed one room more to 
the east and west, and one substituted for the other. The large ones only are there. In 
the buttresses I directed the space between the rock and foundation made of masonry up 
to the level of the rock; the work from that to a given point at the ground line I did not 



16 



order. I laid out the work as it is above the ground line. The piers under the members' 
lobbies were changed from 6 small to 3 large ones. I understood the three large were to 
be built instead of six small, as a compromise, for which there was to be no extra. There 
would have been double as many quoins ; there is more material but less labour, and I 
should as soon build the one as the other. I have never in any instance, where I have 
made an alteration, been told by the architects or any one eUe that I was wrong. 



1 2th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard. Victor Bourgeau. 

John Morris, — Examination continued. 

The dotted line outside the colouring around the library, shows the footings of the 
wall, as I set them out in the rock, to the surface of the rock. I directed them to be built ; 
but they had been erroneously built of the thickness shown by that dotted line from the sur- 
face of the rock to the ground line, without authority or my knowledge. 

Before the tenders were received, I informed the Deputy Commissioner hat my esti 
mate of the value of the Parliament buildings was $492,000, without fireproofing. At the 
time the Prince was here I applied verbally to Mr. Keefer, for assistance on the works, for 
a person at a moderate salary, who could make measurements of what was going on, and 
look after the minor details, while the clerks of works were otherwise employed. This 
application I repeated, but was at last refused. I was never absent from the works except 
on leave, and illness from over work. 

(Signed,) John Morris. 



Thomas Fuller sworn : — 

I am an architect by profession, and have been in practice about seventeen 
years. I have been in this Province since 1857. My first knowledge of the 
Parliament Buildings was derived from a notice to architects, from the Department of 
Public Works, dated the 7th May, 1859. From seeing that notice I with my partner, Mr. 
Jones, determined to compete for the designs. I, with him, put in two designs, one of 
which, with some modification, is the one upon which the Parliament Buildings have been 
erected. After we had put in our designs, the first communication we had was a letter of 
the 3rd December, 1859, from the Assistant Secretary of the Province, telling us that our 
plans were not considered by the Government to be perfectly adapted to the purposes for 
which they were intended, and would not be adopted unless they could be altered so as to 
be made satisfactory to the Government. 

We were told that should we desire to alter the plans, so as to make them meet the 
requirements of the Government, it would b3 necessary for us to repair to Quebec at our 
earliest convenience, to confer with the Department of Public Works there on the subject. 
On the receipt of this we went to Quebeo. On our arrival there we were informed by the 
Secretary of the Department of Public Works, that a letter had been sent us from that 
Department, of the 6th September,. with a copy of the Order in Council, approved of by 
His Excellency the Governor General on the 29th August, 1859. 



17 



These we did not get till our return, but we were informed of their contents while in 
Quebec. 

We arrived at Quebec on the 5th day of September, and I attended on the Deputy 
Commissioner, Mr. Keefer, and in consultation with him was shown the Order in Council 
of the 2nd September. (See Blue Book, page 18.) After several consultations during 
three days, we received the letter of instructions of the 9th September, from the Deputy 
Commissioner. (Blue Book, page 20.) I remonstrated with Mr. Keefer about the short- 
ness of the time between then and the 15th October, to do all the work mentioned in the 
letter, but he urged the necessity of letting the work that year, and I was induced to 
undertake to do it the best way I could during the given time. 

The competition designs had no detailed specifications ; there was a general descrip- 
tion of the building, and of the mode in which the work was to be done in general terms, 
not going into detail at all. 

During the time we were in Quebec on that occasion, Mr. Keefer entered into terms 
with us as to our remuneration for our services ; we were to have 5 per cent, on the out- 
lay ; we were not to make any charge for extras occasioned by omissions in our plan and 
specification. We were to furnish one set of plans and specifications to be kept at Quebec 
and one set at Toronto. Mr. Keefer thinking it advisable that another set should be at 
Ottawa, it was agreed we should be paid in addition for those. The specifications, 
after approval, were to be printed but not to be sold. I wished to be allowed to supply 
quantities, as is the custom in England, and everywhere, as I suppose ; but he said the De- 
partment did not allow it, and if we did so, we must do it at our own risk. The rule in 
the profession is, for the architect, if he pleases, to make out the quantities of the work 
for parties tendering, who pay for them to the architects. 

In reference to our remuneration, we wrote to the Deputy Commissioner on the 17th 
November, 1859. (See copy of letter in Instructions to Architects.) On^the back of this 
is an endorsement by the Deputy Commissioner, to the Commissioner, for which see this 
also. 

We wrote to the Commissioner on the 19th November, 1859, on the same subject 
(See letter of that date.) It was intended the charges should be those usually paid to 
architects. 

By Mr. Keefer's wish we returned to Toronto by way of Ottawa, to see the site of the 
buildings, and to make any enquiries we thought necessary ; we did so, and got back to 
Toronto on the 10th September. From that time till the 11th October we worked on the 
plans. 

We had been directed, by the instructions of the 9th September, to put in five boilers 
in the area without the main walls, but on the 20th September I wrote to Mr. Keefer to 
say, that on conferring with the parties who constructed the heating apparatus in the 
Toronto University, we thought two boilers in the central court better than five, and to 
have fans to drive the heated air in winter and the cold air in summer through the build- 
ing ; and to answer us by telegraph. He answered by telegraph, on the 22nd, that our 
plan for heating by two boilers was approved. 

I found it impossible to get our plan completed, showing the heating. Mr. Keefer 
had telegraphed us, from Ottawa, on the 7th October, that he would be in Toronto on 
Monday evening, and to get the specifications translated into French, . and have copies 
ready to send to Quebec. It would have been impossible to have prepared the plans in 
time, shewing the system of heating and ventilating, and, as far as my experience extends, 
it was a responsibility not usually thrown upon architects on buildings of this extent. 

On the 11th October, at Toronto, after several consultations, the plan of heating was 
left out of the plans and specifications intended for the use of parties wishing to tender 
for the work. Heating is in itself a separate branch of construction, and I know of no 
public building in England which has not been done by persons professing that branch of 
business, under the superintendence of the architects. The plans provided ventilating 
flues from ventilating shafts, the ordinary fire places, and two large flues for the use of 
boilers. 

3 



18 



If the heating and ventilating had been put in the plans and specifications, it would 
have been impossible for parties wishing to contract, to have been able to do so in the 
time allowed them, unless bills of quantities had been made out, for which there was no 
time and no authority. 

In constructing buildings of this kind, the Department of Works would have to rely- 
on the estimate of the architect, that the work could be done for a given sum. 

With a list of prices and the quantities of work, the Department could estimate the 
cost of the buildings. 

When the plans and specifications were finished, they were as perfect as plans usually 
are, and would enable contractors to estimate their quantities fairly. We had nothing to 
do with preparing the form of tenders for the work j they were sent us from the Depart- 
ment. It is not an unvarying praccice to have schedules of prices with the tender. In 
this case it was intended that schedules of prices for work should accompany the tenders, 
but the notice to contractors and the form of tender have no reference to schedules of 
prices to accompany the tenders. I know that blank tenders and blank schedules of 
prices were delivered at Ottawa and Toronto to any person wishing them. I do uot know 
what was done at Quebec. 

If a schedule is attached to a contract, it should have reference to the price at which 
the contract is taken, but if the contract be too low, that schedule ought not to be ap- 
plied to extra work, unless by its heading it applies to extra work. 

I should think a builder foolish who signed a contract so applying it, and an employer 
equally unwise who accepted a tender below the value of the work. 

There was no schedule with Mr. McGreevy's tender, but there was one made between 
the time of opening the tender, and the signing of the contract. The contract has a 
schedule of prices attached to it. 

Before the contract with Mr. McGreevy was signed, he had put in a schedule of 
prices, which on examination were palpably in excess of the contract. On seeing this, I 
suggested to Mr. Keefer, that a great deal of difficulty might be obviated, by making pay- 
ments at given stages in the progress of the work. He said this was not the usual mode 
of doing business in the Department. He then requested Mr. Stent, Mr. Morris, and 
myself to make a schedule of prices for Mr. McGreevy's contract. 

At our first meeting we all agreed that the work was taken at from 30 to 40 per cent 
below its value. I suggested, I think, and the rest agreed, that we should make a sche- 
dule at fair rates, and from it deduct from 30 to 40 per cent. I left Quebec before the 
schedule was finished, but I understood when I left that they were to be made on that basis. 

A day or two after the tenders were given in, at his request, I gave Mr. Keefer an 
estimate of my valuation of the work on the Parliament building ; it was $492,000. It 
was known to Mr. Keefer I think, and all the architects knew that Mr. McGreevy could 
not perform the contract at his price, but at a loss. 

When 1 first made the competition designs I did not estimate strictly their value, but 
when I afterwards did it, I found their cost exceeded the appropriation. 

I think this the only style of building which is really adapted to this climate. It 
admits any thickness of wall, any quantity of light, has steep roofs well adapted to pre- 
vent the accumulation of snow on them. The steepness of the roof has the effect of 
throwing the rain from the walls. Eaves troughs are not provided for nor are they advisa- 
ble, where their exposure is great, and there are heavy storms. When I came to Ottawa 
on the 8th September, I discovered that the ground for the buildings was not level, but as 
the particular site had not been determined upon, I was unable to show it on the plans. 
As the fairest way I could imagine, I assumed the ground lines to be level. I called 
Mr. Reefer's attention to this on the 11th October, and he agreed it was the fairest way to 
assume the foundation at two feet under the ground line on the plan. 

I think the site of the building should have been determined before the contract 
plans were drawn. Where there was any doubt as to the nature of the foundation, test pits 
ought to be sunk, but here it was assumed that the rock was within two feet of the 






19 



surface. We knew the ground to be uneven, and there was no possible way of placing the 
building so as to stand on even ground. There was no examination made to my know- 
ledge to ascertain the nature and character of the foundation, before the contracts were 
let. The plans we made for the contract were lessened and modified as we were instruct- 
ed, excepting as to the heating and ventilating, and these were omitted under the contract, 
and for the reasons I have stated. I have not had schedules of prices attached to any 
works under me, before this instance, in this country. 

I have had them in England, though not usually. I understood it was the practice 
of the Department of Public Works to have them, and I believe there were schedules of 
prices attached to the contracts for the Toronto University. It is more Norman in its 
style than this, which is Gothic. 

On the face of the schedule of prices attached to Mr. McGreevy's contract, they were 
applicable to extra work as well as contract work, but I was informed by Mr. Keefer that 
it was a mistake. Mr. McGreevy had protested against it when he signed the contract, 
and I was instructed by Mr. Keefer not to regard the schedule as applicable to extra or 
additional work. 

I apply the term extra, as applicable to work done, which has been erroneously 
omitted to be specified, and the term additional to work done beyond the work shown, 
or intended to be specified. In this instance the additional work, is that required to be done 
under the assumed foundation line shown on the plan. We received a letter from the 
Department of Public Works, dated 23rd March, 1860, requesting us to transmit a sche- 
dule of the prices upou which the extra work on the Parliament Buildings should in our 
opinion be returned, and paid for in the progress estimates. From this I inferred that 
the Commissioner did not intend to hold the schedule attached to Mr. McGreevy's con- 
tract, as binding on him. On the 30th March, 1860, we returned three prices for extra 
work, namely: Excavation in rock, not exceeding 5 feet in depth, $1.25 per cubic 
yard; the same below 5 feet in depth, $1.90 ; Masonry, in foundations and 
backing, $8.00 per toise of 51 feet ; and we informed the Commissioner that it was 
impossible to fix, with any degree of accuracy, a complete schedule of prices, until 
the works were further advanced. These prices were acted upon, I think, till Mr. 
Page came on the 8th February, 1861, when the price, $1.90 per yard of rock excavation 
was limited to the second 5 feet, and $2.25 fixed as the rate for the third 5 feet. At 
these prices the rock excavation was returned, till Mr. Killaly's measurement of the works 
after they were suspended in October, 1861. 

We made no other schedule as. the work progressed, but our progress estimates show- 
ed, from month to month, the extra works, and the prices we attached to them. The 
progress estimates signed by us, and returned to the Department, are the progress estimates 
of work of all kinds done on the buildings. Those I look at now, marked No. 5, I have 
no doubt are copies of them. Before Mr. Keefer left Toronto, after instructing us about 
the plans and specifications, I understood he intended to advertise for the heating and 
ventilating of the buildings, and I saw about the 18th of November, a notice from the Depart- 
ment of Public Works, dated 14th November, for Tenders until the 30th December, for 
heating the Parliament Buildings at Ottawa ; reference was made to us for plans of the 
building. These plans lay open for the inspection of any one who chose to refer to them. 

On the 16th January, 1860, I had a telegram from Mr. Keefer, saying I was required 
at Quebec, to advise on the heating and ventilating, and to come down at once. 
I left for Quebec that night and arrived on the 18th, and on the 19th I was examining 
the plans for heating and ventilating with the Deputy Commissioner. The plans I allude 
to are those of Mills, Stocklin & Co. , Mitchell's, Garth's four systems, and Bartly and 
Gilberts'. After examining them thoroughly, I made a report in writing to the Commis- 
sioner on the 21st January, 1860, called in the blue book, 23rd January. The report is 
printed in the blue book, beginning at page 138. 

On the 23rd January, Mr. Keefer made a report to the Commissioner, who was then ill 
at his house, but we went there and submitted them, and he appeared to approve of them. 
I stated to Mr. Keefer that I thought it would be wise for the architects and himself, or 
some other competent persons, to go to Washington and Philadelphia, where a similar 



20 



system was in operation, and sec and inspect the work. I understood afterwards, the 
Commissioner had made it a sine qua non with Mr. Garth, that he should go himself and 
see these works. 

I left Quebec on the 24th January. On the 2nd February, 1860, I had a telegram 
at Toronto, from Mr. Keefer, to say " Mr. Garth has been referred to you at Ottawa, to 
arrange the plan of heating, — is there now/' On the 3rd February I left Toronto for 
Ottawa, and arrived there on the fourth. I' found Mr. Garth there, and I learned from 
my partner that a letter from the Department of Public Works, had been addressed to us 
at Ottawa : (see letter 28th January, 1860.) Mr. Garth's plans were to be matured under 
our directions, specifications were to be prepared, and everything arranged between us and' 
the contractor, subject to the approval of the Commissioner, in order that a contract could 
be entered into with the Department, which should embrace the whole system of warming 
and ventilation, in as complete a mauner as itwas possible for us to devise, and that the plans 
and specifications should not add anything to the amount of the tender, which was 
$61,285. 

On the 6th, 7th and 8th February, 1 was engaged with Mr. Garth in Ottawa. I 
made memoranda on his plan, to guide him in making his contract plans. On all these 
days Mr. Morris, the clerk of works, was called iu, whenever we required him, to consult 
or advise about them, and on the 9th I and my partner made a report to the Commissioner 
on the subject ; it is published in the blue book, page 162. On the 14th February, we 
wrote a letter to the contractor, which we sent for the approval of the Commissioner of 
Public Works j it was countersigned by John Morris, approved by the Commissioner, and 
delivered to the contractor on the 27th February, 1860. 

This is the order referred to by Mr. Morris : 

II We request you to excavate the ground for the various foundations, down to the 
surface of the rock, and also the whole area of the central court, and all the trenches 
requisite for the cold air ducts in connection with the warming apparatus^ and leave open- 
ings for doors in the basement walls of the rooms in the front part of the building, so 
as to give access, and fit them for future use should they be required, giving them light 
also from without, and fire-places within, as shown on the working drawing." 

I heard no more of this matter till the 5th April, and 1 then received at Toronto a 
telegram from Mr. Keefer, saying : " Mr. Garth having completed his plans, I have 
appointed to meet you and him at Ottawa on Tuesday next." I arrived at Ottawa on 
the 10th. On the 11th I was with Mr. Keefer, examining Mr. Garth's plans. Mr. 
Keefer on consultation made some slight modifications. I was with Mr. Garth on the 12th, 
going over the plans. Mr. Garth left us tracings sufficient to guide us, and went away 
to perfect two contract plans. 

Before these excavations and works for the heating and ventilating wore ordered, I 
made no detailed estimate of their cost, but I told the Deputy Commissioner they would 
cost £30,000 for the Parliament Buildings ; and I heard Mr. Morris tell him in my pre- 
sence, about the 11th April, it would cost that sum for the excavation and masonry, 
exclusive of Garth's contract. I never was asked to make any estimate of the cost. 



21 



1 3th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman. 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau, 

Thomas Fuller, — Examination continued. 

The first time I informed Mr. Rose of the expense of the heating and ventilating wa s 
ahout the 8th of June, in presence of Mr. Stent. I told him they would coit in the 
Parliament Buildings at least £30,000, and Mr. Stent told him that in the Departmental 
Buildings it would cost about the same. We told him this on our application to have 
the order in Council revoked, and a new one made in regard to our per centage, on the 
basis of the agreement with the Deputy Commissioner. 

We insisted that these works had been undertaken since the order in Council, and 
we ought to be remunerated for the superintendence of so great an undertaking. We said, 
besides, the order had never been assented to by us, and if he left office we should be in 
a false position regarding it. He said it was not a good time to move in it, and we need 
not be afraid, for he should at all events be in the House, and he would state that he 
considered we had protested against that order in Council. (See letters 11th July and 
22nd August, 1861.) 

Although the order to the contractor dated the 14th February, aud delivered 
to him on the 27th, does not allude to rock excavations, I say that the excavations 
therein mentioned, after the first sentence, were rock excavations, and were so understood 
by the contractor and every one connected with the works ; and it was upon that order, 
that all the excavations of air ducts, boiler house, and everything connected with heating 
aud ventilating, and also the drains under the air ducts, were executed. 

There was no other written order ever given respecting these works. We made no 
cross sections or measurements of these rock excavations; the measurements and sections 
were made by the Clerk of Works, and were entered in a book which was kept in my 
office. This book was there when Mr. Page was here making his report, but I missed it on 
the 7th March, 1861, and I have never been able to find it since. It must have been 
taken away by some person, but I could never discover who took it. From that book the 
progress estimates were made up, and from it Mr. Page got his measurements. I never 
checked the measurements Mr. Morris and Mr. Grist were the only persons who made 
the measurements. Mr. Morris had the charge of the excavations and measurements. 
Mr. Grist was under him, and his assistant. 

When Mr. Kcefer was at Ottawa, on the 11th April, with Mr. Garth, it was then 
determined how the ducts should be terminated. The whole matter of conducting the air 
to the Parliament building was discussed between Mr. Keefer, Mr. Garth, Mr. Morris and 
myself. My first idea was that the external air could have been brought from the 
courts; the next was that the air might be supplied from a number of small ornamented 
shafts about the grounds; but it was conceded that the distance from the bank, which the 
cold air would have to come in winter before it reached the steampipes, would modify its 
temperature, and in summer the same modification of temperature would occur. And so, 
on a full consideration of the subject, it was determined to terminate at the bank. From 
our instructions we conceived it was our duty to adopt the best mode without reference to 
economy, and the one adopted was the best. 1 think Mr. Garth told me, that before he 
tendered, Mr. Keefer had given him permission to sink the boiler house ten or eleven 
feet, and it was sunk to the depth he wished. We had to make a sewer in the rock from 
the boiler house to drain it, but the part above the sewer was used as an air duct. 



22 



I concurred in Mr. Garth's reasons for lowering the boiler house. We had a tracing 
of Mr. Garth's system for our guidance, but we did not get his perfected plans till about 
the 25th August. They were sent to U3 by express, and the letter from the Department 
of Public Works, advertising us of their being sent, is dated the 23rd August, 1860, 
No. 33598 — subject No. 1026. By a letter of the 24th August we had a list of the plans, 
23 in number. 0:i the 17th September we were requested to return the plans, in order 
that the contract with Mr. Garth might be completed, and during the week we returned 
them. About the 18th October, we received a letter, dated the 16th October, No. 34,123 
requesting us to arrange a meeting at the Department of Public Works, in conjunction 
with the architects of the Departmental Buildings and the contractor for heating and 
ventilating, for the purpose of agreeing upon and drawing up a specification for the con- 
tract for heating and ventilating, in accordance with the plans agreed on, and the tender, 
and conditions of the Order in Council. 

We were farther told that the specification was necessary to enable the Department to 
have the contract signed, and that no money could be paid till it was signed. 

I left for Quebec on the 27th, but being delayed by fog, I was too late, and the con 
templated meeting was not effected. 

A meeting on the subject took place in Ottawa about the 6th day of November, 1860. 

Mr. Keefer, Mr. Garth, and myself were present. Mr. Garth's specification was 
discussed, and approved. On the 16th, we had copies of the specification sent us, and 
were requested, conjointly with the architects of the Departmental Buildings, to make an 
estimate of the work done by Mr. Garth, in this contract, up to the 1st January. In this 
letter we were informed that Mr. Garth signed his contract on the 12th January, 1861. 

Before Mr. Keefer came on the 11th April, 1860, we had determined not to use brick 
for the air ducts, and on discussing the question with him, on that occasion, it was under- 
stood they should be of masonry. 

There was no written order to execute the masonry in the air ducts, nor do I recol- 
lect any specific verbal order, but it was understood it was to be done as the work is done. 

There were a few feet of Bouchard dressed ashlar begun, but I considered it too 
good, and pick faced ashlar was substituted, as now found in the work. 

Mr. Morris carried out the work, as he understood our order. The price of this 
work was returned at first at 41 cents per foot superficial, measured on the face for the 
stone, and dressing ; the masonry, at $8.00 per toise of 54 feet. 

There was no specific order, written or verbal, for the boiler house, but I agreed with 
Mr. Morris it should be pick faced limestone, as it is. The price of stone in the boiler 
house was 90 cents per superficial foot for stone, and dressing ; at $8.00 a toise, of 54 
feet for masonry. 

All this work was discussed with Mr. Morris and Mr. Keefer, and approved, and the 
prices fixed. I know that the cost of the works connected with the heating and ventilat- 
ing, on the Parliament Building alone, unconnected with Mr. Garth's contract, up to the 
first day of February, 1861, amounted to $136,000, to which there ought to be added 
about $20,000 at a rough estimate, of the increased sewerage ; and there has been expend- 
ed since that time about $44,710.63 on these heating and ventilating works. Of this 
amount $20,168.68 was paid to Garth on his contract. 

On the 6th February, 1861, 1 had a conversation with Mr. Page ou the subject of the 
class of masonry in these ducts. He told me his attention had been directed to it, and a 
very considerable saving could be effected by the use of ordinary rubble masonry. On this, 
I telegraphed to Mr. Garth to know if the sides and arches of cold ducts would do to be 
built of ordinary rubble masonry. His reply was, " if well and smoothly built they 
will answer." 

On the 13th February, 1861, we received a letter from Mr. Page requesting us to use 
rubble masonry in certain parts of the work. (See letter in blue book, page 244.) See 
our letter of the 16th February, and contractor's letter of the 15th, to which I refer. My 
own conviction is that rubble masonry is not adapted for the work. 



23 



To be fitted for the purpose, rubble masonry must be smoothly pointed ; but the action 
of the air would be constantly disintegrating the mortar, which would produce a continual 
supply of impalpable dust, which would be drawn into the rooms at all times while the 
system was in operation. 

At the meeting with Mr. Keeferon the 11th April, it was understood that the con- 
struction of these air ducts, and walls, and vitiated air flues, and ventaducts, should be 
under the supervision of a person specially appointed, but no such person was ever sent. 
So far as I am capable of judging, this system of heating and ventilating is the best which 
could be conceived. I have considered the subject, and believe I am capable of forming 
a correct opinion upon it. 

The rock excavations were made under our orders. There was one part only upon which 
there was a doubt. My first impression was, that it was not necessary, but 1 think it was 
properly removed under the circumstances. It was that part under the west wing, and 
uuder the Legislative Assembly rooms. Mr. Keefer agreed with us in this opinion. I 
know of no unnecessary excavation of rock. The position of the buildings, and their foun- 
dation lines, were approved of by the Deputy Commissioner, and afterwards by the Com- 
missioner; and by a letter datedjlst February, 1860, from the department, we were informed 
that the block plan showing the sites of the Parliamentary and the Departmental build- 
ings, and their respective levels, was submitted to, and approved of by the Executive 
Council, and that we were to arrange the levels of the buildings as thereupon represented. 
The clerk of works, Mr Morris, had been notified to the effect, that we were to have free 
use of the drawing which was in his possession. In accordance with this, the ground 
levels and sites were fixed as they now are by us. We staked out the building in Decem- 
ber, 1859, but we laid out no foundations. This we left to the Clerk of Works. I really do 
not know who laid out the foundations. I suppose Mr. Morris did it, or his assistant, Mr. 
Grist. We held Mr. Morris responsible for it. We did not check the foundations while 
they were being laid or constructed, and we took no measurements of them, till Mr. 
Page came in January, 1861. I do not consider it was our duty to do so. Trusting to the 
competency of Mr. Morris, who was employed by the Department of Public Works, as 
competent to do his duty, I took it for granted the foundations were right, and I did not 
interfere in any way about them. I drew his attention several times to the extra thick- 
ness of the walls generally, and he told me they were made thick at the instance of the 
contractor. He said they were done without his order. 

I told him to be careful. I inferred from what he said, the contractor was doing it on 
his own responsibility. The progress estimates were signed by us «n the measurements of 
Mr. Morris, who, I understood, was measuring the walls in order not to include more than 
ought to have been done. From the extreme unevenness of the ground, its being encum- 
bered with material and the stone from the excavation, and sand, it was very difficult to lay 
out the foundations correctly, and I told the Clerk of Works he would be justified in lay- 
ing them out so thick, that he should have no difficulty in laying out the contract wall, 
when he came to doit. From the detached way in which the foundations were obliged to bo 
begun, I should have thought it wrong in the Clerk of Works to have tried to lay them 
out to an inch, or even six inches either way. I think no one now coming on the ground, 
and seeing the work as it is, can form any opinion of the difficulty there was in laying out 
these foundations. We understood we were employed by the Government as architects, 
not as clerks of works or mechanics, or foremen of works. The usual practice after 
an architect is appointed, is, that he has the nominating of the clerk of works, who is 
paid by the employer, but subject to the entire control of the architect, who when so 
appointed becomes responsible for the acts of the clerk of works. 

In this case, the clerk of works was appointed without our recommendation, and in- 
dependent of us, and so we are not reponsible for his acts ; and, as a fact, Mr. Morris assumed 
to act, and really did act independently of us. He made reports to the Department, cor- 
responded with the Department, and took instructions from it independent of us. In 
proof of this I refer to Mr. Reefer's letter to Mr. Morris of the 28th May, 1861. He is 
there told " he should in future confine his attention exclusively to the Parliament buildings, 



24 



and act altogether under the orders of the architect of those buildings, without exerting 
any authority over the other clerks of works." 

From the time Mr. Grist first came upon the works, till after the 29th May, 1861, he 
never was put under our orders; he was the assistant of Mr. Morris ; but the duty of Mr. 
Grist was from that time to see that our orders were strictly carried into effect. 

We do not hold ourselves in any way responsible for the errors in the foundation 
walls. I never met the Deputy Commissioner from the first commencement of the works 
till the 28th May, 1861, that I did not remonstrate and protest against Mr. Morris having 
the general superintendence of the works, and I insisted his duties should be confined to 
the Parliament buildings under us. As his appointment stood, he had the general super- 
intendence of all the works, and although a clever man, was in a false position himself, 
and placed us in a humiliating position up to the 28th May, 1861 . I regret that I did not 
at the first take the same stand against Mr. Morris's position, as I did when the arrange- 
ments were being made for layiug the corner stone. 

In reply to my remonstrance about the appointment of clerk of works, I was told it 
was the practice of the Department, and part of the patronage of the Government. 

Knowing the ability of Mr. Morris, his standing and experience in the profession, 
and his reputation, I certainly thought I was justifiable in trusting him to set out these 
works. 

If the walls were made thick at the instance of the contractor, they ought not to be 
allowed as extra. I was aware that a great part of the material excavated from the foun- 
dations, was used in the foundation walls, but I was not aware that the walls were thick- 
ened for the purpose of using that material, although I understood generally from Mr. 
Morris, they were thickened at the instance of the contractor. 

I think the walls might well be allowed six inches thicker than the contract plans, 
for the reasons I have stated in regard to the laying out the foundations. 

If two walls have to be within a foot or two feet of each other, I should leave it to 
the discretion of the clerk of works to make the work solid or not, and allow it extra or 
not, in his discretion. I understand the custom in measuring here, to be, that any wall 
under two feet, is measured as a two feet wall, making 27 feet in the face of the wall, as 
a toise of 54 feet. No wall in the building, on this rule, ought to be measured as less 
than two feet thick, although in fact it be less. 

When we signed the progress estimates, we assumed Mr. Morris had measured the 
works according to the usual mode of measurement here. The basement walls were not 
set out by us ; they were by Mr. Morris or his assistant, Mr. Grist ; we took no part in it. 
The reasons why the division walls in the upper story were not carried up with the outer 
walls, were the want of brick, and the desire to get up the outer walls. 

When Mr. Killaly was here, the walls were not at their present height, and it was 
deemed expedient to have them up, and the cornice put on, before they were covered in for 
the winter. The division walls were, for these reasons, not built with the rest. 

These walls were carried up in part after the work was stopped. I am not prepared 
to say why the brick lining of the wall was not carried up with the walls. 

I understood when I complained of it, the want of bricks was no reason, but the clerk 
of works had no instructions from us to deviate from the usual mode of doing the work. I 
do not think it was necessary in every case to carry up the division walls with the outer 
walls. 

It is not right that a wail should overhang the foundation a foot, but it may safely do 
so, for the plinth batters eleven inches. 



25 



1 4th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman. 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Thomas Fuller, — Examination continued. 

I gave no special order that I can remember, one way or the other, for carrying, or not 
carrying up the division walls with the outer walls. 

The tie between the principal walls and the division walls, can best be made when 
they are built at the same time. 

If the outer wall is to be carried higher, or have much greater weight on it than the 
division walls, it is better not to build them together, but have a chase for the division 
walls. 

Some of the thin walls between closets were purposely left down. I do not remember 
that any others were. I remember no instance in which Mr. Morris refused to obey, or 
evaded our orders. He did not latterly always carry them properly out. I did think 
Mr. Morris assumed authority inconsistent with his duty as clerk of works. He came and 
went as he pleased, and was frequently absent from the works, and I always suspected he 
•was in communication with the Deputy Commissioner, and exercising a surveillance on the 
architects. Mr. Morris assumed a position inconsistent with his duty, even after he had 
been told to hold himself under our orders. On the 22nd October, 1861, we had a letter 
from the Department, No. 38,815, (see letter). This we communicated to Mr. Morris 
He replied to it on the 25th October, in these words. u I beg respectfully to acknowledge 
receipt of your letter, containing a communication from the Department of Public Works, 
and in reply thereto, beg to remark that my appointment as clerk of works proceeds direct 
from the Government, and my tenure of office is <uch as to preclude my recognition of the 
subject mentioned in that communication, or the method adopted of communicating the 
same, inasmuch as I am not in any way in your service." 

As regards the measurements, I verbally told Mr. Morris to adopt the local measure- 
ments of the place. I gave no directions as to what that was, for I did not know myself. 
We took the measurements from him and certified them on his return. I learned from Mr. 
Morris and Mr. Grist, that they measured rubble masonry by the toise of 54 feet, as by 
the contracts; the cut-stone without the beds or joints ; the moulded work was measured 
by its girth j plain work by its superficial face without bed or joint ; the joints were measured 
in as rubble work ; openings were deducted. I believe half the arch was allowed. Bricks 
by the thousand, counting 17 to the cubic foot. Excavation by the cubic yard. Cham- 
fered work by the foot run. Mitres so much measured by the lineal foot. Carving 70 
cents per lineal foot, including the preparing the stone. Circular work, the mean measure- 
ment, adding 8 cents afoot. Circular moulded work, 17 cents in addition to plane moulded 
work; straight work, moulded, 81 cents Sunk face 35 cents a foot. Sunk face 
circular 50 cents. These prices all apply to Ohio stone. Native sand stone bush 
hammered was 23 cents. Circular 35 cents. Sunk work 56 cents. Circular sunk 
work 81 cents per foot. These standards of measurements, we took from the clerks 
of works, as being the local standard, and these were the prices allowed in the 
progress estimates, which are not final. These prices corresponded, as far as they 
could be estimated, with the schedule prices. I cannot say whether these prices were 
warranted by the amount of the contract. I caunot well determine this without 
quantities. My impression is they were in excess of the contract. 

The contractors complained about the mode of measurement, prices, and everything 
else. The complaints applied to contract and extra work. By a letter dated 12th June, 
4 



26 



1860, we were asked to report whether in our opinion the gross amount of the contract would 
warrant any increase of price upon the items of the schedule furnished therewith, or, 
whether it would be fair and just to the contractors and the Government to raise the price 
of these items, and take it off others, regulating the whole, however, in such a manner as 
not to exceed or fall short of the gross amount of the contract. (See letter of the Depart- 
ment, No. 32,513.) We did not report on that letter, for, on the 4th June, we had a tele- 
gram from the Secretary of the Department to say, " Commissioner wishes to see you here 
at once, on subject of revision of schedule " Mr. Stent, of the Departmental Buildings, 
was summoned also. I and he were at Quebec on the 6th June ; the 7th was a holiday, 
and on the 8ih we had an interview with Mr. Reefer, the contractors being present. After 
a long conversation, Mr. Stent and I declined to make any alteration on our own responsi- 
bility. We returned to Ottawa, and the prices were returned on the estimates as they had 
baen. From my experience, rather than from any test, and from the fact that the schedule 
of prices had been prepared on a reduced scale for Mr. McGreevy, contractor, I think 
these prices were not remunerative. 

The progress estimate oi June, 1861, was signed by us ; we signed none afterwards 
till we signed the one returned by Mr. Killaly. On the 2nd August, 1861, I was at Que- 
bec, and had an interview with Mr. Cauchon, the Commissioner, who stated there had 
been many complaints from the contractor, as to the mode of measurement and the esti- 
mate. He asked me if I had any objection to be relieved from the responsibility of mea- 
surements and estimates ; I said, I certainly had not. On my return to Ottawa, I found the 
July estimate had been sent by Mr. Bowes, without being shown to us, and we received 
from the Department a letter dated 14th August, 1861. I know of no other reasons for 
the change than those stated by the Commissioner to me, and in that letter. But in a 
letter from the Department, dated the 28th June, we had enclosed a letter from Mr. 
McGreevy, dated 22nd June, and we were requested to report on the various matters 
therein referred to. Sometime in the beginning of July — the day does not appear in oui 
copy of the letter — we replied to the various matters alluded to by Mr. McGreevy, referred 
to in the letter of the Department of the 28th j I refer to the letter which I wish read. 
From this time the measurements and returns were made by Mr. Bowes. (See his letter 
of instructions from the Department, dated 31st May, 1861 ; and see also his further 
instructions as regards returning of estimates, dated about the end of July) We fur- 
nished no figured plans, and no plans of the foundations, to clerks of works. The contract 
plans were sufficient. These were on a scale of ten feet to an inch ; we were quite pre- 
pared to make such plans, but Mr. Morris, the clerk of works, said they were sufficient, 
and we furnished no other. I consider any competent man could lay out the foundations 
from such plans. 

There were no estimates ever made by us, or asked for by the Department of Public 
Works, in regard to the excavations for drains aud ducts necessary for the introduction of 
Mr. Garth's heating and ventilating system. It is not for me to say what the Department 
ought to have done in reference to this, but if I had been introducing such a system, I 
should have had an estimate of the cost of the works it was likely to entail. If the 
appropriation first made was all that was intended for the Public Buildings, it did not warrant 
their undertaking it at all, far less the introduction of the system of heating and ventilating : but 
I looked upon that appropriation only as a beginning, and. I never heard any other opinion 
expressed. It was known to the Deputy Commissioner of Public Works that the prepara- 
tion for the introduction of this system of heating and ventilating into the Parliament 
Building would cost £30,000, for he was told this by myself and Mr. Morris, and a like 
sum for the other buildings. 

The progress estimates were not palpably in excess of the sum, until Mr. Page came 
On the joint representation of Mr. Keefer and myself, in which the Commissioner con- 
curred, I understood the system was adopted. I refer to the report and its adoption, pub- 
lished in the Blue Book, pages 138 and 144. The works, while in progress, were visited 
by the Commissioner, ou the 20th December, 1859 ; on the 4th July, 1860 ; in Septem- 
ber, with the Prince of Wales, laying the corner stone j by the Deputy Commissioner on 
the 20th December, 1859 ; 11th April, 1860 j 21st June, 1860 ; in September, with the 
Prince of Wales j 4th October, 1860 ; 22nd May, 1861, three weeks ; lQth July, 1861. 



27 



Mr. C auction was here in July, 18G1 ; Mr. Page on the 18th December, 1860, almost 
constantly till March, 1861. Mr. Rubidgc was with Mr. Keefer in May, 1861, and 
remained a few days longer than Mr. Keefer. These are all the visits of which I can 
speak. 

We recommended that a model should be made of the library. I sent two tenders 
for its construction to the Department. Zollicoffer's was #200, but he was paid $600, 
because it was altered and additions made to it. Mr. Keefer was consulted about it in 
April and in June, and he approved of all that was done. Mr. Keefer authorised the 
payment of the money for it. Zollicoffer lost on his contract work, but was well paid for 
his extra. I think he lost on the whole. In any buildings I have ever had, there never 
lias been any objection to having models made ; in fact there ought to have been models 
made of the principal portions of all the buildings. In the absence of Clerk of Works, I 
have given plans and instructions to contractor's foremen ; there was no unwillingness on 
their part to follow them out. 

From the time we were first instructed to draw up the contract prices, we were look- 
ing at specimens of stone for the building, and for the rubble facing of the walls. On the 
20th January, 1860, we sent in a report recommending Nepean and Tcmpleton stone, and 
estimated the additional cost at $15,400. I refer to the Blue Book, page 253. 

Upon this the Commissioner of Public Works reported, and on the 2nd June, 1860, 
an Order in Council authorised the change on certain conditions — (See Blue Book, page 
264.) I believe this Order in Council^was communicated to us in a htter which we have 
not now, and I think the change was communicated to the contractors directly. In esti- 
mating this work for the progress estimates, it was put at 21 cents in addition to the 
contract prices. 

This sandstone is unquestionably more durable than limestone. I cannot speak 
positively as to whether the contractor bound himself to the conditions of the Order in 
Council, but I know we estimated the extra expense at 21 cents over the contract price, 
per superficial foot of wall in the progress estimates. 

When Mr. Page came in the beginning of 1861, we made a measurement Df the walls 
as far as we could. We took the measurements from the Clerk of Works, and estimated 
jhem as near as we could. 

Our estimate of work done is dated the 1st February, 1861, which see. The work 
done on the contract was estimated at the rates I mentioned, but the extra work was 
valued at prices, then approved by Mr. Page, on contractors' claim. Our report and his 
approval, see memorandum published in Blue Book, pages 284, 292. In our report, the 
prices at which we returned the extra work appear, and the reason of these changes. On 
that occasion Mr. McGreevy asked leave to put in his statement. We made our report as 
being the sole arbiters of the prices, as one of the conditions under which the contractor 
tendered, and it was approved by Mr. Page. The assent of the Commissioner was not 
asked. 

On the 6th Juue following, the contractor did complain of these prices. He wanted 
one dollar a foot for Ohio stone. He wanted beds, and in some cases the face, of Ohio and 
Brockville stone, and the deduction of the openings on the face of the buildings, but we 
took no notice of this, as the prices we fixed on were for progress estimates only. 

He also complained that material for extra work had been estimated as for contract 
work. Filling to walls, stone and sand in rubble masonry. Ohio stone, Arnprior marble, 
sand stone flagging, labour, clay pipes, brick. And he complained there was no progress 
estimate on labour, on flues, block stone in piers, sand stone flagging in lintels, block sand 
stone, and labour on same, in quoins below ground level, extracting shaft and extension of 
main tower. Face work in do. Carpenters work in lintels, sashes, architraves, &c, in 
part of basement. These prices we continued until we gave up signing the estimates. 
When Mr. Killaly came, we considered he had the supreme authority to fix and determine 
every thing. We only signed his estimate as a matter of form, without any responsibility 
whatever. As we understood it, the progress estimate of work done and materials delivered 
for the Parliament Buildings, to &0 Ut October, 1861, was based upoa the rates of prices 



28 



and principles of measurement for past and future works, arrived at and approved of by 
the Hon. H. H. Killaly, and Thomas McGreevy, as the heading of it shows. I gave my 
opinion once on being asked, but I and my partner took no responsibility in it. It bears 
at the end of it our certificate as to its correctness, but we only certified it as based upon 
the principles and terms stated in its heading, and not as to the correctness of the prices. 
I understood these prices were settled as a compromise, which he had full power to make. 
J do not recollect any direct request from Mr. Killaly that I should sign this estimate ; but 
1 recollect saying to him, " I can have no objection to si^n it, when by its heading you 
assume the principles and rates upon which it is based "j and I say now, that it was upon his 
desire, in some way expressed, though I cannot now remember the distinct terms of it, 
I did sign it. My estimate of the amount required to finish the buildings, stated in Mr. 
Killaly's report, is based upon his prices and mode of measurement, not upon any estimate 
of my own. I cannot say how much it is in excess of the contract prices, or of the prices 
we settled with Mr. Page ; and I have never made any estimate as to what it will take to 
finish the buildings. I should not like to venture even a guess estimate. A positive esti- 
mate would take months to make, those of Mr. Killaly are but approximate estimates. 
The estimates we made for Mr. Page, of work done, was approximate; the work then to be 
done, except upon the library, was upon quantities. I never made out the quantities of 
work which oir plans required. The tender we volunteered, when we sent in our com- 
petition designs was from Ginty & Co. I only know, and I cannot speak of responsibility, 
and I do not know the securities they offered. Up to the time the change was made in 
the position of Mr. Morris, he certified to the time of the Clerks of Works ; we did it 
since, up to last month. 

Mr. Morris is competent for his work. Mr. Grist is good for office work, and generally 
speaking correct, except as, to laying out work. Mr. Larose does not profess to be able to 
make calculations or draw out plans, but he is very competent to lay out, and superintend 
the practical part of the work. Mr. Bowes is thoroughly competent in every way. I 
understood Mr. Larose's salary originally was at the rate of $1,116 a year ; that of Mr. 
John Bowes $1,000 a year ; and of Mr. Grist, $1,000 a year. Mr. Morris got 
$1200 a year, and by a letter from the Department of the 19th day of August, 1861, the 
salary of Mr. Larose was made $1400 a year, and that of Bowes, $1200 a year. The 
salary of Grist was not increased. 

There was no basement in front in either of the wings. We were ordered to put in a 
basement, and in doing so, we advised the extra cut stone work below the plinth and the 
windows to be weathered and gabled, and the walls thickened. The drawings were shown 
to Mr. Keefer, and he made no objections. 

The cornice projects over the wall 1 foot 3 inches, the batter of this at 10 feet below 
the plinth, including the plinth projects 11 inches beyond the wall. Mr. Morris told me 
he thought it best to have the foundation of the tower solid, and asked me if I thought 
so too, and I said I did. 

I remember on consulting with Mr. Morris about the thickness of the air ducts inside 
the building ; we directed they should not be less than two feet. The walls facing the 
courts were to be brick in the original specification. There were no brick fit for it, and 
when we determined to use other material, we substituted Nepeau stone for the brick. 
The jambs in the basement are thicker than was intended, and there is extra work. Who 
ordered it I do not know positively. I think it was Mr. Grist who told Mr. McGreevy's 
foreman to make it like the others. I was not aware the bricks Mr. Morris had rejected 
were put into the Parliament buildings. They were certainly not by my orders. 

The projection of the main tower, 9 feet more to the front of the building, was at my 
suggestion, and under the verbal order of the Deputy Commissioner. I suggested in the 
presence of Mr. Morris, marble columns in the main tower. 

The Deputy Commissioner approved of them, and they were put in. 

They were taken out again because sufficient allowance had not been made for the 
compressing of the masonry, and the pillars would have been injured. 



29 



The flagstones for bonding the buttresses of the main tower, were not ordered by us, 
but the contractor claims them as extra, and they have been allowed. They had to be of 
the same material as the facing. 

Tf the facing had been limestone, the bonding stones would have been limestone also, 
and not extra. The butresses of the library are 8 feet 6 inches by 4 feet, by several or- 
ders approved of by the Deputy Commissioner. We gave instructions to Mr. Larose, and 
Grist, to set out the ground floor walls on the basement walls. A great portion of this I 
superintended myself. 

The original specification, calls for stones of different sizes and colours, for the re" 
lieving arches. After the Nepean stone was determined on, we wished the darker colour" 
ed Templeton stone to be used for the relieving arches. 

At this time, the red sandstone had been used on the Departmental Buildings, and I 
admired it. Kobert McGreevy said to me, " if you have no objections I will use that red 
stone, if you will allow me to use it of irregular sizes. " 1 conseuted, and it was used, and 
not considered as au extra. He soon after claimed it as extra, but it was not allowed, and 
became one of his subjects of complaint. 



15th AUGUST, 1862. 



31 EMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON Q. C, CHairman, 

Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Thomas Fuller, — Examination continued. 

I do not kuow the rule for measuring cut stone in Ottawa, but I believe it to be face 
measurement. In measuring ashlar work no bed or joint is allowed except on bond 
stones. In measuring the work on the boiler house, and air ducts, I measured the face 
only. This would I believe be consistent with the rule in Ottawa. All the cut stone was 
measured on the face. I cannot say how much of the work yet to be done can be refer- 
red to as contract work, and what extra work. 

There is now so much additional work, and so much change in the work, that the 
contract can with difficulty be applied, excepting by measuring the whole work, and de- 
ducting what the contract called for. I think in justice between the contractor and the 
public, the whole work should be fairly measured, and valued without reference to the 
contract. The additional work, I call all below the contract line for the foundation, and 
all connected with the heating and ventilating. 

These were so very much that before the contractor began his contract work at all, 
material had become higher, and wages higher, and in this way he is called upon to fulfil 
his contract, which under circumstances the most favourable, must have resulted in a loss. 
I cannot tell how wide the excavation in the rock is beyond the walls; the clerk of works 
measured it, aud the entries were made in that book which is lost. The hoop iron bond 
was discontinued as unnecessary, by our order. The Deputy Commissioner was present I 
think when I stated it. Before we made our report on the Heating and Ventilating we 
had conversed and consulted with Mr. Garth, in presence of the Deputy Commissioner, 
about it. We have a book, in which is shown the working drawings delivered to the con- 
tractor, and the time of their delivery. I put it in (see No. 6 exhibit). 

There was no one specially appointed to superintend the Joiners' and Stone Cutters' 
work in the shops, it was unnecessary. Mr. Morris and Mr. Larose, did what was neces- 
sary, as part of their duty, 



30 



Wheu I found the foundation wall had been put in wrong, I requested Mr. Larose to 
have another wall put in alongside the other ; both were measured to the contractor as 1 
understood. With reference to these wrong walls in the foundation, I never could learn 
satisfactorily to whom the mistakes should be attributed, whether the clerk of works or 
the contractors' foreman, so we allowed them to the contractor. 

I do not remember, that I ever ordered any of them to be taken down, in these foun- 
dations. The pillars in the lobbies of both legislative chambers were to be of Ohio stone. 
Thinking marble to be so much better, I made drawings, and an estimate for them, which 
I sent to the Department for approval. 

In the meantime Mr. McGreevy, thinking the change would be allowed, ordered the 
marble, and proceeded with the work without orders. After a correspondence with the 
Department, the change was not sanctioned. I do not know whether it was allowed as 
Ohio stone, or marble either before or at Mr. Killaly's measurement. 

The contractor was probably misled by the delay of the Department. We sent the 
estimate, and order for approval on the 31st July, 1861 ; the letter of disallowance is dated 
the 4th September, and was received about two days after its date. 

The ceilings of the upper floors were to have been of wood, but by a letter from the 
Department, 1861, No. 38259, which see, the upper tier of joists and ceilings, were to be 
made of iron and fireproof materials, also the roofs of the corridors aud tower structures, 
leaning against the main building, and the Library, were to be of iron. We were requested 
to prepare the necessary plans, specifications, and estimates for these works, together with 
the order for the contract to execute them. I put in the various orders for the different 
works. In the basement, under the members' lobby, there|[were to be six piers. Mr. Mor- 
ris asked me if I had any objection to making the alteration to these as they are now. I 
said not. 

I did not suppose the alteration would make any extra. I never saw what I could 
say was a wilful attempt on the part of the contractor to make extra work. 

There was an alteration in the saloons caused by a vault for the heating and ventilat" 
ing. Detached pillars and arches were shown on the plan. I caused them to be changed as 
they are now. 

I gave no written order but a drawing. By a letter of the Department dated 27th 
September, 1861, and the 28th, we were informed that the works were to be stopped at the 
end of that month, and they were stopped. But I cannot tell what damage Mr. McGreevy 
sustained by that stoppage. On the 18th July, 1861, we had a letter from the Department 
of Public Works, requesting us to prepare, and furnish the Department with plans, spe- 
cifications and estimates for the setting and roofing the boilers connected with the heating 
and ventilating of the Parliament buildings. (See letter). We had another letter from 
the Department dated the 30th July, 1861, requesting us to submit for the approval of the 
Commissioner, the order to the contractor to do the proposed work for the setting and roof- 
ing of the boilers. (See letter.) 

In accordance with these instructions, on the 19th August, 1861, we forwarded the 
plans, Nos. 81, 82 and 83; also the estimate at prices approved of, by the Chief Engineer, 
in January last. The estimate was $20,900. (See letter, and estimate in detail.) 

This included the main ventilating shaft, of 130 feet in height. A letter of the De- 
partment, 11th September, 1861, requested us to prepare, and transmit for the approval of 
the Commissioner, an order for the contractor to proceed with the works, necessary to the 
roofing of the boiler house, setting &c, as shown in drawings, Nos. 81, 82 and 83, and 
to say that in the meantime the contractor had been authorised to begin the works. 

It did not appear whether the fronts of Mr. Garth's boilers were to be brick or iron. 
By a letter, dated 20th July, 1861, we were requested to prepare and send down plans, 
specifications, and estimates for boiler fronts, in connection with the heating and ventilat- 
ing of the Parliament Buildings; also requesting us to transmit the order to the contractor 
to do the proposed work. (See letter No. 37,595.) As requested, on the 19th August, 
1861, we complied with that request and sent the estimate — $4,390. (See letters to Secre- 
tary pf Department, of this date.) There were quantities taken from our plans, while they 



31 



lay in our office, for the inspection of contractors. A Mr. Simmons took them, Mr. Gun- 
dry, and others. I got a copy cf Mr. Simmons' quantities, but he was there on his own 
responsibility, not ours j we had nothing whatever to do with him in the mutter of these 
quantities. Simmons had been in our office, but I told Mr. Morris, at Quebec, and all the 
contractors I saw, that we had nothing to do with his quantities. 

The plan I put in is on a scale of eight feet to an inch, and shows correctly for all 
practical purposes, the foundation walls, as they are, in light blue, and upon them the con- 
tract walls in darker blue. I cannot swear to their being absolutely correct, but correct 
enough to show what is intended. When the foundation walls are figured from positive 
measurements, the difference will appear in numbers between the contract walls and 
those actually executed. In the meantime they are not figured. We never assented to 
the Order in Council of the 9th November, 1859, aud we did not undertake to do the duty 
imposed on us, with regard to measurements stated in the letter to us of 12th December, 
1859, only through the clerk of works. I never knew monthly measurements and estimates 
being made where there was a contract. In large buildings there is always a measurer 
appointed for that purpose. I considered it to be the duty of architects to prepare all 
plans, generally supervise the work, and to give certificates to builders in relation to the 
contract. Although the architect is not supposed to measure the work performed, he is 
responsible for it if the clerk of works is appointed at his recommendation. If he measures 
extra or additional work, he has a right to be paid for it, and to be paid incidental and 
travelling expenses. 

I quite agree with Mr. Morris that the power of an architect ought to be supreme on 
the work and his responsibilities equal to his power; but I do not think the architects 
were supreme on this work, and they were relieved from the responsibility by the ap- 
pointment and duties of Mr. Morris. I should trust to the clerks of works to see that the 
work was properly laid out, without myself constantly measuring and testing it. I told 
the Deputy Commissioner 1 would not measure for the monthly estimates, and he knew 
the view I took of my responsibilities. The estimate of Mr. Killaly, for finishing the 
works, was made by us and Mr. Bowes, and calculated at the prices and measurements 
Mr. Killaly established. The model of the library was changed from that of the plan, 
on consultation with Mr. Keefer, on our suggestion. 

(Signed,) Thos. Fuller. 



Thomas Stent, sworn. 

I am an architect by profession, and have been engaged in it nineteen years. I have 
been engaged at buildings all my life. My father was a contractor, I have been engaged 
in this Province as an architect for seven years. I am the partner of Augustus Laver. 
He and I are the architects of the Departmental buildings at Ottawa. 

I and my partner put in competing designs for all the Parliament buildings here, but 
our design for the Departmental buildings was the one adopted with modifications. 

It was from the public notice we sent in our designs to the Department at Qiiebee. 
We were soon after notified that our design tor the Departmental buildings was awarded 
the first premium, and our design for the Parliament buildings, the second. 

We had a telegram requesting us to go to Quebec, then a letter dated the 3rd day of 
September, 1859, from the Assistant Secretary of the Province, saying : " I have the 
honour to inform you that the series of plans, &c, for certain public buildings at Ottawa, 
submitted by you, and to which the first premium has been awarded, are not considered 
by the Government to be perfectly adapted to the purposes for which they are intended, 
and that these plans will not therefore be adopted, unless they can be so altered, as to be 
made satisfactory to the Government. Should you desire to alter your plans so as to make 
them meet the requirements of the Government, it will be necessary for ycu to repair to 



82 



Quebec at your earliest convenience, to confer with the Department of Public Works 
there on the subject. The Government will not however be liable for any expenses you 
may incur in the matter." 

We went to Quebec for this purpose on the 8th day of September, 1859, and on the 
9th we had an interview with Mr. Keefer the Deputy Commissioner, and from him we 
took instructions to alter the plans, so that instead of retaining the block shape, with courts 
in the middle, they assumed the form of an l • 

It was suggested by the Deputy Commissioner verbally, that the buildings should be 
three stories. We left for Ottawa, and there received written instructions, (which see 
dated 14th September, 1859, No. 29103,) for altering and perfecting the designs. 

On the 19th of the same month we had a note from the Deputy Commissioner, 
marked " unofficial," telling us that in the official letter sent from the Department re- 
specting the modification of the Departmental plans, which we submitted, it was condi- 
tioned that there should be three stories to the buildiugs, but upon further consideration, 
he thinks, that giving these buildings three stories, when the Parliamentary have but two, 
will not be right, and asks us to consider it well before completing the plans, as it forcibly 
strikes him, they might be kept down to two stories, in order to produce a good effect. If 
we agreed with him on this, we were to prepare plans accordingly, and he would have the 
instructions modified in this respect. 



1 6th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C. Chairman. 
Joseph Siieard, . Victor Bourgeau. 

Thomas Stent, — Examination continued. 

Acting on the instructions and this note, we modified the plans to their present 
shape, and on the 8th September, the public notice to contractors was published. 
(See Blue Book, page 19.) In every building I have had to do with, I have made 
out exact quantities for my cwn satisfaction, and for the purpose of giving them 
to intending contractors, and being paid for them, as I understood the English cus- 
tom to be. In accordance with this view, we published a notice in the newspapers 
addressed to contractors, that u lithographed bills of quantities lor the Departmental 
buildings, may be obtained on and after the 15th October, by applying to the ar«hiteets 
at Ottawa. Persons wishing to have copies will please give early notice thereof." This 
had attracted the notice of the Department, and we received a letter dated 2nd October, 
1859, from the Department, No. 29307, which see, stating it was contrary to the prac- 
tice of the Department to supply such information to contractors, and we were requested 
not to commit the Department, in that particular, to any bills of quantities which we 
might think proper to furnish. And we were told to inform intending contractors, that 
such bills were not given by the Department, and that the Department would not hold 
themselves responsible for them. 

Mr. Keefer wrote requesting us to furnish a copy, to an intending contractor. (See No. 
6£.) We proceeded in making the plaus, but" we found it impossible to get them out in time, 
and the time was postponed. The plans were completed and sent, on the evening of the 
15th October. They arrived at Quebec on the 17th or 18th of October. And the speci- 
fications were sent on a day or two after. At the same time they were sent to Toionto. 



During the time Mr. Keefer was in Ottawa, on the 6th October, he had directed us to 
have the specifications translated into French, and both English and French copies printed. 
On the 12th October, we had a telegram from Toronto from Mr. Keefer, saying, " the 
heating of the buildings may ba left out of the specification, and made a separate con- 
tract." We had not contemplated any complex system of heating. We had provided 
for the ordinary ventilation. Our plan provided a boiler house, extracting and smoke 
shaft. On the same day we had another telegram from Mr. Keefer telling us to specify 
time for the completion of the Departmental buildings 1st January, 1862. And we speci- 
fied it accordingly. On the 22nd October we had two telegrams from Mr. Keefer, from 
Quebec, one to say, " the time for receiving tenders here for the public buildings at Ottawa, 
is postponed until Tuesday, the 15th November, at noon." By the other, he wished to 
se« me at Quebec, respecting our specification, as soon as I could come down. 

I went immediately to Quebec, and received instructions to modify the specification, 
which I did. In accordance with the rule of our profession, we included in our specifica- 
tion certain general conditions which we considered material. They are to be found in 
the original printed specification, which see. These were left out ; some of them however 
were embodied in the contract, others not. 

I superintended the printing of the specifications and brought them up to Ottawa. 
At Quebec, Toronto and Ottawa, our plans and specifications lay for the inspection of per- 
sons wishing to contract. We received printed blank forms of tenders, and blank sche- 
dules, to give to intending contractors, and we got more of these forms printed here, but 
we had nothing to do with making these. The tender of Mr. McGreevy had been sent in 
without a schedule, and when it was decided to adopt the tender, I was requested, with 
Mr. Fuller, and Mr. Morris, to prepare a schedule which should be applicable to that 
tendter, as regarded the Departmental buildings. 

We consulted together, and looking at three of the schedules which had been sent in 
with tenders from other parties, which we considered fair ones, we ascertained an average 
proportion of the gross amount of them compared with Mr. McCreevy's, and we reduced 
the prices accordingly, so as to apply to his contract. It was understood by the Deputy 
Commissioner and us all, that the contract was too low. It was lower by 35 per cent than 
the average of the three other tenders, which we considered fair ones. 

The schedule thus prepared, was intended for Mr. McGreevy's contract, for progress 
estimates. Having made this schedule, I and Mr. Morris, applied it to our quantities of 
the departmental buildings, and found it came within £500 of the tender. McGreevy put 
in a gross sum for all the buildings, and separate ones also. We took his separate tender 
for the departmental buildings into our consideration. This schedule was left in the 
department. 

We were not aware that Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., had the contract for the 
departmental buildings, until we received a letter from the department, of the 10th Decem- 
ber, No. 30053. On receiving this letter we obeyed its instructions, and went on with the 
work. Our plan had no reference to the ground as it actually was, but to an assumed line. 
The ground line was assumed to be three feet three inches below the level of the ground 
floor, and the foundation of the excavated parts of the buildings was 9 feet below that 
assumed ground line, in all 12 feet 3 inches below the floor line. In the uuexcavated 
parts, the foundation line was 4 feet below the assumed ground line, in all 7 feet 3 inches 
below the floor line. 

Mr. Morris had a plan of the site, aud its levels, and from him we received instruc- 
tions where to place the buildings. Subsequently we had a letter from the department, 
No. 30691, of 1st February, 1860, informing us that the block plan showing the sites of 
the parliamentary and departmental buildings, and their levels, had been submitted to and 
approved of by Order of Council, and the Commissioner, and we were to arrange the levels 
of the buildings, "as thereupon represented. We personally staked out the cardinal points 
of the buildings, with the assistance of Mr. Morris, and left him, as clerk of the works, to 
lay out the foundation. We gave him the ground plan of the buildings, on which the 
sizes of the rooms were figured. If we had been at a distance, we should have given plans 
figured, showing dimensions of wall, and projections, but as we were on the spot, we did 
5 



84 



not think it necessary. The sections showed the footings of the walls and the specifica-' 
tion described the footings. They were to be of two courses of six inches deep, and to pro- 
ject not less than four inches. 

From Mr. Morris' known efficiency we did not consider figure drawings necessary. I 
believe the walls are built in accordance with the specifications, part of the back walls 
excepted. Save where they are affected by the heating and ventilating system, they are 
built in accordance with the plans and specifications, excepting in little details, but there 
is an extension of considerable magnitude on the eastern extremity of the east block. As 
we designed that building, it was thought of importance to have the front overlooking the 
city of imposing appearance, and the end towards the parliamentary buildings not so much 



so. 



In the letter to us of the 10th December, from the department, No. 30,053, we were 
directed to alter the position of the small tower of the eastern building, and place it at the 
east end of the Wellington Street front. In the original plans there were arrangements for 
the departments, but on Mr. Reefer's visit in April, there was a new arrangement made. 
The departments, excepting the Bureau of Agriculture, took nearly all the buildings, 
excepting the east end of the east wing, which was found too small for that department. 
We prepared a design showing the required room and extension, and the elevation over- 
looking the city. This we submitted to Mr. Keefer on his visit in June, i860, and he 
approved of it. Mr. Morris was cognizant of this design, and was present when it was sub- 
mitted to Mr. Keefer, and approved of by him. This is additional to the contract. We 
had no written order for this work. No estimate was made or called for, but it was 
approved of, and done with Mr. Keefer's approval. At the same time we had submitted 
to him plans of parapets and pedestals to all the entrances, as well as the fact, that, the 
building having been ordered not to be put so deep in the ground as originally intended, 
by 3 feet, steps would be also required ; to all of which he expressed his approval. 

I omitted to state that on the 26th January 1860, we wrote to the Commissioner of 
Public Works, to inform him we had pits excavated at different part? of the site of the 
right hand block of the departmental buildings, for the purpose of ascertaining the nature 
of the soil, and the depth from the surface to the rock j we found the soil to consist of ^ 
feet of loamy sand, next to the surface, and an equal quantity of clay immediately below it. 
Where the rock was deepest, the depth to the rock, at the south-east corner of the build- 
ings, was 13 feet 9 inches, and at the south-west corner 11 feet 6 inches ; whilst at the 
north-west end of the building, it was not more than 6 feet below the surface, and at the 
proper depth to receive the foundation walls of the building. We begged to suggest the 
desirability of excavating for all the foundation walls to rest on the rock, as we feared the 
building would be otherwise insecure. We had prepared an estimate of the additional 
cost of excavating and walling required to accomplish this, and found the amount to be 
$4,275. 

For answer to this letter, see that of the Department No. 30,783, and which refers 
to it as being dated on the 1st February, instead of the 26th January, as we have it. 

The first information we had of the heating and ventilating was from the letter of the 
Department, No. 30,636, dated 28th January, 1860, which see. After the receipt of this 
letter, Mr. Garth came to Ottawa, and submitted his plans to us, and we adapted his piano 
to ours, and gave directions to carry on the excavations in accordance with his system. 

The adaptation of his plan consisted in the lowering the boiler houses ten feet and 
enlarging them ; in a modified system of drainage, deeper by teu feet than we contem- 
plated ; in excavating foundations for air ducts ; and changing the position of the drains 
so as to drain the boiler houses. 



85 



ra c . rr*- 



17th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 

Soseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Thomas Stent, — Examination continued. 

Before we ordered the excavation for the drains and ducts ij accordance with Mr. 
Garth's system, we had a consultation with the Deputy Commissioner and Mr. Morris, 
who agreed that their proper position was where they were constructed, exterior to the 
buildings j but Mr. Garth's plans extended only through the exterior walls. 

On this consultation, it was agreed by Mr. Reefer, that the termination of the air 
ducts for such departmental buildings should terminate at the intended fence wall, and 
should have ornamental piers at their terminations on walls on the south and west. The 
length of the main sewer of the east Departmental building from the external wall to the 
bank is 402 feet, and is from 18 to 28 feet in the rock, and about 22 feet wide on top. 

There are five air ducts on the east side of the building, but in order to save excava" 
tion, we placed them over the sewer, in the same rock excavation. 

There is still another duct to be made for the east side of this building. There are 
also yet five air ducts to be made for it. These are on the west, and terminate on the ter- 
race wall, and two on the south to terminate on the front wall. The ducts were broken off 
at the external walls, on Mr. Garth's plan, as his contract had nothing whatever to do 
with the construction of the internal or external ducts, or for the preparation for his 
system. This preparation, external and internal, was left for us. 

There are ten air ducts for the west Departmental building, two on the south, two on 
the east, one on the north return, four in the court, and one on the west return. 

The main sewer extends from the boiler house in a north westerly direction to the 
bank in the rock, and is 368 feet long, its depth from 25 to 30 feet, average width on top 
about 22 feet. 

Advantage was taken of this excavation, to place five of the air ducts over the sewer, 
four of which have been constructed, and an opening left for the fifth one. 

The other ducts for this building at present terminate at the exterior walls, but are 
to be constructed and terminate as those in the eastern building. The Deputy Commis- 
sioner approved of all these works, and was aware of their extent before they were begun. 
The only order for this work to the contractor, was the order of the 28th February, 1860, 
No. 1, Exhibit No. 7, which applied to all the works they did, but the words of which 
referring to these works are, u and also to excavate for boiler houses, and other works re- 
quired in connection with the contract for heating and ventilation." 

On this order, the contractors performed all the excavations, constructed the air ducts 
and flues, and did everything which has been done in connection with the heating and 
ventilating. Although nothing is said in this order of rock excavation, or of the class of 
masonry to be used in the duets or boiler houses, it was perfectly understood by Mr. 
Reefer that it was rock excavation, and that the masonry was to be of the class generally 
that it is, and as in our instructions, which were, to be in as complete a manner as it was 
possible for us to devise. (See letter 28th January, 1860, No. 30,636,) 

When we were preparing our plans, it was understood the excavations were to be in 
jrock, and it was contrary to our expectation that earth boulders or hard pan excavations, 
to any extent, were founcj qx\ the site* of these buildings, Mr. Garth's plan called for ab 



36 



ducts of brick, but we never contemplated using brick, which was not suitable ; but he 
never dictated to us how they were to be constructed, if they had smooth surfaces. 

Before we commenced our air ducts, those in the Parliament buildings had been com- 
menced and their style of masonry determined upon, and in a letter from the department, 
we were directed to apply the same system of construction as had been adopted on the 
Parliament buildings. 

On all these circumstances, our authority was grounded for constructing these works. 

The excavations for these ducts were made chiefly during the summer of 1860. 

In January 1861 we found the contractors preparing limestone for them, with the 
bed outside, or on the cant, as it is termed. This we forbid. On the 6th February, 1861, 
we addressed a letter to Mr. Page, who was then at Ottawa. We told him, that in going 
through the estimate for cold air ducts, in connection with the contract for heating and 
ventilation, on the Departmental buildings, it appeared to us that there might be some 
modification of the class of work in which they arc proposed to be built, and we desired to 
confer with him on this subject, and wished either to call on him, or meet him at our 
office, which he pleased. And he replied concurring in our suggestions, and directing us 
to " at once take the necessary steps to stop all expenditure on works connected with the 
ducts, other than those required to carry out the mode of construction intimated in the 
letter above referred to. That is to say, that the sides and arches of the ducts, where 
they extend much beyond the respective lines of the buildings, are to be formed of a 
good class of coursed rubble masonry, laid, if need be, in cement mortar for 9 inches or 
a foot back from the face of the walls, except that the outer end of each, for a distance 
of 30 feet, may consist of dressed stone, of a similar class to those used for such parts of 
the ducts as are in the interior of the buildings." (See report and correspondence, Blue 
Book, 238 to 245) ; and the works were constructed on this more economical mode, so far 
as the Departmental buildings were concerned. 

We required the excavations for the foundation iu the rock, to be two feet wider on 
each side, than the walls were to be. This is specified. We directed the excavation to 
be measured to that width, but there would be occasionally instances where a greater 
width would be made, which would be allowed, but we have the cross sections and measure- 
ments. We had only Mr. Morris as clerk of works on the 19th April, 1860. We always 
thought Mr. Morris had too much work assigned him. No man could act efficiently as 
clerk of works to three such buildings. 

We did not ourselves, as architects, measure the work done for the progress estimates; 
we did not think it was our duty to do so. We took all our measurements from the clerk 
of works, but we satisfied ourselves of the extent of the work, by inspection, and we de- 
voted about three days to each estimate, to check the calculations, price the bills, and see 
they were correct. We never ourselves actually measured the work done, we took it 
from the clerk of works. 

In estimating the work, where it was contract work, we used the schedule attached to 
the contract. In estimating for extra work we applied what we considered fair current 
rates. Bock excavation below 5 feet at the rate of $1.90 per cubic yard ; below 10 feet 
$2.25. Bock excavation in sewer for western building $2.25 ; below 5 feet $3.25 per 
cubic yard. Bubble limestone masonry per toise of 54 feet $8.00, including openings as 
solid. Labor on stone of boiler house 90 cents per foot, and the dressed stone was always 
included with the rubble masonry. Clay excavation, 60 cents per yard below 5 feet -, 
hard-pan, $2.25 below 10 feet. Bock excavation in drain of west departmental building, 
below 10 feet, $5.00. Cut arches in boiler house, commencing with smoke flues on the 
soffit, $1 .80 per foot ; labor to stone on cold air ducts, 37 cents ; labor on arches in cold air 
ducts, measured on the soffit $2.50 ) arches through divisional walls, measured in the same 
way, 40 cents ; chisselled arrases, 15 cents per lineal foot on quoins ; for carting earth from 
spoil bank for filling in walls, 25 cents, and 51 cents extra for extra haul. Excavating in 
sewers, under 10 feet, in the Departmental building, $6.00 per yard ; for brick, per thou- 
sand, in the wall, $10.50, 20 bricks to the cubic foot in common lime ; bricks laid in ce- 
ment $16,00 per thousand. In smoke flues openings were deducted. I have always, in 



37 



the Province, measured brick at 20 bricks to the cubic foot. On the eastern departmental 
building the prices were lower in some cases : rock excavation, from 10 to 15 feet, $3.00 
per yard j below 15 feet, S3. 50 ; below 20 feet, 84.75 ; below 25 feet $5.25. We allowed 
for Nepean stone facing 21 cents in addition to limestone, measuring to the angle of splayed 
jambs to windows and doors, and one-third of the quoins. Plain cut face work on Ohio 
stone, 20 cents per foot j for sunk and chamered work, 25 cents ; centreing for arches, 
20 cents ; for common iron bars without labor, 7 cents per lb. 

In October, 18G0, after a correspondence with the Department, we allowed for brick' s 
$12.50 per thousand; iron stanchions and saddle-bars for windows, 18£ cents per lb; Nepean 
stone, on new work, 35 cents ; large block stone in cast drain, 30 cents ; dished bouchard 
work, 28 cents j six inch stone flagging to cover drain 15 cents per foot, including work, 
stone, and labor ; fifteen inch glazed stoneware pipes, $1.00 per foot. Prom February, 
1861, brick work was valued at $13.00 per thousand ; but from October, 1860, during 
the investigation by Mr. Page, there was a revision of prices between him and ourselves, 
some were increased, others diminished, but after this they continued all through at the 
following rates : — Brickwork, back to October, 1860, $13.80; and back from October, 1860, 
$12.50 instead of $10.50 ; $9.36 per toise of 54 feet, 20 inch wall, measured as 2 feet wall, 
instead of $8.00, originally allowed. Ohio stone, cube measure 80 cents, built in wall ; 
plain rubbed, per foot superficial 26 cents, built in wall ; circular work, plain, 32 cents; 
sunk work, 34 cents ; circular, sunk, 42 cents ; moulded work, 46 cents ; circular moulded, 
60 cents ; face work on cold air ducts, a reduction of 5 cents, and in work measured 
according to these prices, openings of doors and windows were not to be deducted, — the 
additional work in cutting quoins and window jambs being considered equivalent. (See 
report, Blue Book, pages 303 to 307, and correspondence following). We submitted $1.50 
per foot, soffit only being measured, as a fair price for arches of ducts outside the building. 
And in reference to the dressed stone face in boiler houses, the stone was taken from the 
excavation for sewers on the right hand block, and for 5 feet above the footings, \ve pro- 
posed to pay for it at 90 cents, above that at 78 cents. This last reduction was made in 
reference to Mr. Page's letter. (Blue Book, page 307.) These prices having been 
examined by Mr. Page, we considered they should be embodied in the estimate we were 
making, as far as they were applicable. At the time, we considered them fair and reason- 
able as progress prices, and the estimates were made upon them until Mr. Killaly came. 
From the commencement of the works the prices of material and labour were constantly 
increasing; that of labour in consequence of the repeated strikes among the men, and of 
material in the increased demand for it. On our suggestion, contained in our letter to Mr. 
Page, the Chief Engineer, of the 27th February, 1861, eaves-troughs were dispensed 
with, and balconies over the doors substituted. Eaves troughs and vertical pipes were 
both dispensed with. The prices for some of the extra work, in the summer of 1860, 
were objected to by the Department, and a correspondence followed on the subject. Some 
were allowed, others not, and they stood open till Mr. Page's visit in the winter of 
1860-61. 

We fixed thes-e prices chiefly on consultation with the architects of the Parliament 
Buildings, and sometimes with Mr. Morris, and on our own personal knowledge of the 
value of the work, as well as local enquiry. I wish to refer to our letter of the 6th Octo- 
ber, 1860 ; also to our letter, of the 15th November, to the Department, and our letter of 
the 24th December, 1860, to Mr. Page, Chief Engineer of the Department. We never 
estimated in detail the extra expense of heating and ventilating, and we never estimated 
the extra and additional work done upon them. There is no estimate of the cost of the 
buildings, excepting that of Mr. Page and Mr. Killaly, and we made no measurements 
ourselves for these estimates. Mr. Pattison made the measurements for that estimate ; we 
considered Mr. Killaly a special commissioner, with special powers ; we understood from 
him that he had come to settle disputed points between the contractors and ourselves, and 
that he was also entrusted to deal with the question of compensation to the contractors 
for a breach of their contract on the part of the Government, and that he was authorised 
to enter into the question of compensation to them. The contractors submitted to him 
their claims and grievances in respect of the works. He requested us to meet him at his 
office, and we did. 



38 



He proposed to get Mr. Pattison, accompanied by some person on the part of the Con- 
tractors, to measure the work on a mode of measurement which had been adopted con- 
jointly, and upon which we were consulted. We understood the measurement was made 
in accordance with this mode, but we had nothing do with it, or with the measurements 
from June, 1861. We went over the claims of prices for the work as made by the Con- 
tractors. Many of these prices we objected to, and they were reduced, and some rejected 
altogether. Those reduced were so, to the amount mentioned in his report. If we had 
been consulted as to the settlement, we should have said measure and value of the whole work 
was the fair mode, at the prices we had been chiefly accustomed to [use, and which 
we settled with Mr. Page. We considered measurement and value as the fair mode, be- 
cause the contract had been lost in the amount of extra and additional work. 

Mr. Killaly thought it would be better to give compensation to the Contractors, in the 
increased price for their work and materials. He decided upon allowing it upon his mode 
of settlement. 

Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., put in the prices they claimed. What was allowed was 
put by the side of their claim as an equitable compromise. He got all the information he 
could from us, and from the contractors, as to the value of labor and material. He made 
the estimate and the value of the work done, and to be done, on his own judgment, and 
wheu his estimate was made, he requested us to sign it, and the measurer also. The head- 
ing states that that estimate is based upon the rates of prices and the principles of mea- 
surement for past and future works arrived at and approved of by Mr. Killaly. 

We signed that estimate certifying it to be a correct statement of the amount of ma- 
terial in the building, and that the gross amount, as carried out from the data given, is 
correct. We do not assume the responsibility of its being correct in detail, nor can we 
assume the responsibility of saying what is du« to the contractors for damages for breach of 
contract on the part of the government. We assume that the measurements are correct, 
on the principles Mr. Killaly laid down, but we do not assent to some of the items of his 
prices. 

We do not certify to the measurement, for we never measured the work while in pro" 
gress or afterwards. We only took the measurement as correct by Pattison, on Mr- 
Killaly's principles. 



1 8th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau, 

Thomas Stent, — Examination continued. 

I consider the measuring of beds and joints as the only true mode of measuring 
masonry ; that is the universal practice in England, and in my own practice, but I object 
to measuring openings in face work. 

The local custom is not to measure beds and joints. In our letter to the Department, 
we stited that we thought this the fair way, but we knew it was contrary to the rules of the 
Department, the local custom in this place, and the custom in the Province. 

I considered the prices fixed by Mr. Killaly in excess of prices allowed under ordi- 
nary circumstances. The question of the prices allowed by Mr. Killaly as the mode of 
compromise for damages was what I considered out of the ordinary course? 



Since the adjournment yesterday, I have considered the matter over, and offer the 
following as my matured evidence on the subject of my connection, and that of my partner, 
with Mr. Kiilaly's visit, viz: — In fixing prices for progress estimates, for extra and ad- 
ditional works, I adopted what I considered a prudent precaution in giving prices which 
were below the real value of the work j the object of this was to arrive at a certain price, to 
be paid the contractor on progress work done, at the end of each month. 

I conceive this, in certain circumstances, as in large works of this kind, where a con- 
tract is taken at manifestly low prices, and the extra work precedes it, or is in a larger 
quantity, to be our duty, to prevent the contractors from taking advantages, as they might 
probably do of a large estimate, to dictate to the employer or the architects, or refuse to 
proceed with their contract work. 

We found it impossible in this case to fix the value of work, for the reasons stated, 
viz ; the constantly varying cost of production, both of labour and material. 

When Mr. Page called on me for my opinion, I considered that but little contract 
work was done; and, as the price paid for this contract work was shown by actual measure- 
ment and calculation to be very far below its actual cost, I considered that, in justice to 
the government, we could not at that time materially increase the prices we had been 
allowing. 

If we had done so, it would have been an inducement, or premium, to them to abandon 
their contract. The constant complaining, sometimes to ourselves and sometimes to the 
Department, led us to this conclusion. 

We were not required by Mr. Page to establish final prices, but to give our opinion 
as to whether those originally paid were fair, and should continue to be adopted. For pro- 
gress work a few as stated were raised, and some few reduced by us. This had reference 
to a contract in operation, and which we desired to preserve intact. 

Mr. Page states in his report, that, as from a large portion of the walls being covered 
with snow, he could not form a decided opinion upon prices, and when the works was sus- 
pended by the government, we felt that the whole case was reversed. The contract which 
we had cherished was abandoned, and the contractors, who had hitherto been controlled by 
us, had the upper hand, and the precaution which had guided us in determining prices 
no longer existed, as the contractor would no doubt be entitled to compensation. 

Mr. Killaly then called upon us, and stated that he had come to Ottawa, with a view 
to settle these long disputed points, and wished to know the nature of the differences exist- 
ing ; that he hoped to be able to arrange thematterat once satisfactorily to the government 
and the contractors ; and requested us, in conjunction with himself, to establish prices for 
extra aud additional work, which should embrace the question of compensation to con- 
tractors, and be at the same time a final settlement. He took into consideration all the 
difficulties surrounding the question, and decided they could be arranged by adopting a 
uniform system of measurement, and giving prices to embrace the amount of compensation. 

The whole aspect of the question appeared to us to be changed. We had then to go 
into the whole matter ab initio, and fix prices based upon the actual cost of the work, for 
all additional and extra work. The system of measurement we considered most applicable 
was the English system, that of measuring beds and joints to cut stone, and surface mea- 
surement for all face work. The latter had been done throughout. There were at the 
same time many explanations made by the contractors, evidence given of the cost of differ- 
ent classes of work, which had not been previously laid before us. 

We were compelled to admit that in some cases we had not sufficiently considered the 
extreme labour and cost of some portions of the work. We were, moreover, given to 
understand that the settlement proposed by Mr. Killaly would include a waiver on the 
part of the contractor of claims for damages for the stoppage of the work, there being no 
power given in the contract to either Commissioner or Architects to suspend the works ; 
and on that account also, we were induced to take a more liberal view of prices than we 
should otherwise have done, coupled, as before stated, with the question of compensation. 



40 



It was Mr. Killaly's wish to preserve the contract intact. In view, however, of the 
almost insurmountable difficulties surrounding this course, we should have preferred adopt- 
ing a system of measurement and value applied to the whole, as stated by us ; and I fully 
believe that such a course, adopting fair average rates, would result in an amount similar 
to that arrived at by Mr. Killaly. 

I consider that the amount of additional work is so great, and so ramified throughout 
the whole building, that the contract is entirely absorbed and lost, and that therefore the 
whole should be measured, and the contract sum deducted. 

If a man contracts to work by a certain plan, and that plan is so entirely abandoned 
that it is impossible to trace the contract and say to what part of the work it shall be 
applied, in such case the workman shall be permitted to charge for the whole of the work 
by measure and value, as if no contract at all had been made. 

The contract plan showed the foundation to go only four feet below the ground line. 
All the work under that is additional to the contract; and all the work connected with the 
heating and ventilating, which includes the excavation for the air ducts, the increased 
depth of sewers in consequence of the extra ten feet in depth of the boiler house, and the 
enlargement of the boiler house ; the excavation in the foundation walls below the assumed 
line ; the masonry in the drains, ducts, and foundation walls, below the line shown on the 
contract plans ; the altering of most of the foundations of the division walls, to allow the 
air flues to be built; the building of the extra flues in the division walls; the excavation 
of the basement, and the introduction of rooms therein ; the facing the whole with Nepean 
stone, and the increased size of the east wing of the eastern departmental building, from 
2280 feet superficial, to 4160 feet superficial ; the increased leugth of the north-west wing 
of the western departmental building; iucreased chimney flues from tha new rooms in the 
basement; increased size of chimney tops through the roof; the smoke flues from the 
boiler houses; two new extra air shafts and the others enlarged ; a part of the principal 
ventaduct. 

Whenever the stone which came from the foundations was fit for the foundation walls; 
it was allowed to be used. It was so intended in the specification. It was the right of 
the contractor and a saving to the government, as it prevented the expense of its removal. 
I cannot tell what proportion the extra work bore to the contract work. In every esti- 
mate it was considerably in excess of the contract work. I have no means, and never had, 
of telling how much was contract, and how much was extra work. 

While very considerable progress had been made in the eastern building, the men 
were still working at the excavation of the western one ; and the works in the two were not 
kept separate till Mr. Page came, so 4 cannot tell the .relative proportion of each kind of 
work. When we gave our prices to Mr. Page, we knew that several of the prices were 
low. Two of the principal items, brick and stone, were put under their value, the rest 
we considered fair at the time ; but when Mr. Killaly came, the whole circumstances 
became changed in the way I stated. Mr. Killaly gave his instructions to Mr. Pattison to 
measure the work, without consulting us. He told us what they were. 

We understood that no estimate would be recognized by the department, without our 
signature, and I imagined that in his desire to preserve the contract, he would enforce all 
its provisions, one of which was that we should sign the estimate. We signed it because 
we thought he had arrived at a final settlement with the contractors, based on his authority, 
and he having done so, it became our duty to sign it, as we had all the others. I may 
mention that at an early stage of the work we had declined to sis;n some day bills, and 
payment on them was refused, and this led us to suppose no estimate would be recognized 
without our signature. I imagine it was understood when we signed that estimate, that 
it was to give it effect with the department. We did not make that estimate. Pattison 
made it on Mr. Killaly's instructions, on his principles, and at prices which in part we 
assented to, and in part objected to ; but our view was overruled and the prices fixed on 
his new scale, which, as we understood, his instructions authorized him to do. Mr. Killaly 
in fact made two estimates ; the first we signed in Quebec, the second in Toronto. We 
thought he had authority to settle, and had settled the whole matter, and thinking so, we 
had no objection to acquiesce in it. 



During the time Mr. Keefer was in Ottawa, on the 6th October, he had directed us to 
have the specifications translated into French, and both English and French copies printed. 
On the 12th October, we had a telegram from Toronto from Mr. Keefer, saying, " the 
heating of the buildings may ba left out of the specification, and made a separate con- 
tract." We had not contemplated any complex system of heating. We had provided 
for the ordinary ventilation. Our plan provided a boiler house, extracting and smoke 
shaft. On the same day we had another telegram from Mr. Keefer telling us to specify 
time for the completion of the Departmental buildings 1st January, 1862. And we speci- 
fied it accordingly. On the 22nd October we had two teiegrarns from Mr. Keefer, from 
Quebec, one to say, u the time for receiving tenders here for the public buildings at Ottawa, 
is postponed until Tuesday, the 15th November, at noon." By the other, he wished to 
«ef> me at Quebec, respecting our specification, as soon as I could come down. 

I went immediately to Quebec, and received instructions to modify the specification, 
which I did. In accordance with the rule of our profession, we included in our specifica- 
tion certain general conditions which we considered material. They are to be foursd in 
the original printed specification, which see. These were left out ; some of them however 
were embodied in the contract, others not. 

I superintended the printing of the specifications and brought them up to Ottawa. 
At Quebec, Toronto and Ottawa, our plans and specifications lay for the inspection of per- 
sons wishing to contract. We received printed blank forms of tenders, and blank sche- 
dules, to give to intending contractors, and we got more of these forms printed here, but 
we had nothing to do with making these. The tender of Mr. McGreevy had been sent in 
without a schedule, and when it was decided to adopt the tender, I was requested, with 
Mr. Fuller, and Mr. Morris, to prepare a schedule which should be applicable to that 
tender, as regarded the Departmental buildings. 

We consulted together, and looking at three of the schedules which had been sent in 
with tenders from other parties, which we considered fair ones, we ascertained an average 
proportion of the gross amount of them compared with Mr. McGlreevy's, and we reduced 
the prices accordingly, so as to apply to his contract. It was understood by the Deputy 
Commissioner and us all, that the contract was too low. It was lower by 35 per cent than 
the average of the three other tenders, which we considered fair ones. 

The schedule thus prepared, was intended for Mr. McGrecvy's contract, for progress 
estimates. Having made this schedule, I and Mr. Morris, applied it to our quantities of 
the departmental buildings, and found it came within £500 of the tender. McGreevy put 
in a gross sum for all the buildings, and separate ones also. We took his separate tender 
for the departmental buildings into our consideration This schedule was left in the 
department. 

We were not aware that Messrs. Jones, Haycock k, Co., had the contract for the 
departmental buildings, until we received a letter from the department, of the 10th Decem- 
ber, No. 30053. On receiving this letter we obeyed its instructions, and went on with the 
work. Our plan had no reference to the ground as it actually was, but to an assumed line. 
The ground line was assumed to be three feet three inches below the level of the ground 
floor, and the foundation of the excavated parts of the buildings was 9 feet below that 
assumed ground line, in all 12 feet 3 inches below the floor line. In the unexcavated 
parts, the foundation line was 4 feet below the assumed ground line, in all 7 feet 3 inches 
below the floor line. 

Mr. Morris had a plan of the site, and its levels, and from him we received instruc- 
tions where to place the buildings. Subsequently we had a letter from the department, 
No. 30691, of 1st February, 1860, informing us that the block plan showing the sites of 
the parliamentary and departmental buildings, and their levels, had been submitted to and 
approved of by Order of Council, and the Commissioner, and we were to arrange the levels 
of the buildings, as thereupon represented. We personally staked out the cardinal points 
of the buildings, with the assistance of Mr. Morris, and left him, as clerk of the works, to 
lay out the foundation. We gave him the ground plan of the buildings, on which the 
sizes of the rooms were figured. If we had been at a distance, we should have given plans 
figured, showing dimensions of wall, and projections, but as we were on the spot, we did 
5 



u 



not think it necessary. The sections showed the footings of the walls and the specifica- 
tion described the footings. They were to be of two courses of six inches deep, and to pro- 
ject not less than four inches. 

From Mr. Morris' known efficiency we did not consider figure drawings necessary. I 
believe the walls are built in accordance with the specifications, part of the back walls 
excepted. Save where they are affected by the heating and ventilating system, they are 
built in accordance with the plans and specifications, excepting in little details, but there 
is an extension of considerable magnitude on the eastern extremity of the east block. As 
we designed that building, it was thought of importance to have the front overlooking the 
city of imposing appearance, and the end towards the parliamentary buildings not so much 
so. 

In the letter to us of the 10th December, from the department, No. 30,053, we were 
directed to alter the position of the small tower of the eastern building, and place it at the 
east end of the "Wellington Street front. In the original plans there were arrangements for 
the departments, but on Mr. Reefer's visit in April, there was a new arrangement made. 
The departments, excepting the Bureau of Agriculture, took nearly all the buildings, 
excepting the east end of the east wing, which was found too small for that department. 
We prepared a design showing the required room and extension, and the elevation over- 
looking the city. This we submitted to Mr. Keefer on his visit in June, 1860, and he 
approved of it. Mr. Morris was cognizant of this design, and was present when it was sub- 
mitted to Mr. Keefer, and approved of by him. This is additional to the contract. We 
had no written order for this work. No estimate was made or called for, but it was 
approved of, and done with Mr. Keefer's approval. At the same time we had submitted 
to him plans of parapets and pedestals to all the entrances, as well as the fact, that, the 
building having been ordered not to be put so deep in the ground as originally intended, 
by 3 feet, steps would be also required ; to all of which he expressed his approval. 

I omitted to state that on the 26th January 1860, we wrote to the Commissioner of 
Public Works, to inform him we had pits excavated at different part? of the site of the 
right hand block of the departmental buildings, for the purpose of ascertaining the nature 
of the soil, and the depth from the surface to the rock ', we found the soil to consist oi .*» 
feet of loamy sand, next to the surface, and an equal quantity of clay immediately below it. 
Where the rock was deepest, the depth to the rock, at the south-east corner of the build- 
ings, was 13 feet 9 inches, and at the south-west corner 11 feet 6 inches ; whilst at the 
north-west end of the building, it was not more than 6 feet below the surface, and at the 
proper depth to receive the foundation walls of the building. We begged to suggest the 
desirability of excavating for all the foundation walls to rest on the rock, as we feared the 
building would be otherwise insecure. We had prepared an estimate of the additional 
cost of excavating and walling required to accomplish this, and found the amount to be 
$4,275. 

For answer to this letter, see that of the Department No. 30,783, and which refers 
to it as being dated on the 1st February, instead of the 26th January, as we have it. 

The first information we had of the heating and ventilating was from the letter of the 
Department, No. 30,636, dated 28th January, 1860, which see. After the receipt of this 
letter, Mr. Garth came to Ottawa, and submitted his plans to us, and we adapted his plan* 
to ours, and gave directions to carry on the excavations in accordance with his system. 

The adaptation of his plan consisted in the lowering the boiler houses ten feet and 
enlarging them ; in a modified system of drainage, deeper by ten feet than we contem- 
plated; in excavating foundations for air ducts ; and changing the position of the drains 
bo as to drain the boiler houses. 



35 



g ■■■■■■« 



17th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Crairman, 
Soseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Thomas Stent, — Examination continued. 

Before we ordered the excavation for the drains and ducts ia accordance with Mr. 
Garth's system, we had a consultation with the Deputy Commissioner and Mr. Morris, 
who agreed that their proper position was where they were constructed, exterior to the 
buildings ; but Mr. Garth's plans extended only through the exterior walls. 

On this consultation, it was agreed by Mr. Keefer, that the termination of the air 
ducts for such departmental buildings should terminate at the intended fence wall, and 
should have ornamental piers at their terminations on walls on the south and west. The 
length of the main sewer of the east Departmental building from the external wall to tho 
bank is 402 feet, and is from 18 to 28 feet in the rock, and about 22 feet wide on top. 

There are five air ducts on the east side of the building, but in order to save excava" 
tion, we placed them over the sewer, in the same rock excavation. 

There is still another duct to be made for the east side of this building. There are 
also yet five air ducts to be made for it. These are on the west, and terminate on the ter- 
race wall, and two on the south to terminate on the front wall. The ducts were broken off" 
at the external walls, on Mr. Garth's plan, as his contract had nothing whatever to do 
with the construction of the internal or external ducts, or for the preparation for his 
S3'stem. This preparation, external and internal, was left for us. 

There are ten air ducts for the west Departmental building, two on the south, two on 
the east, one on the north return, four in the court, and one on the west return. 

The main sewer extends from the boiler house in a north westerly direction to the 
bank in the rock, and is 368 feet long, its depth from 25 to 30 feet, average width on top 
about 22 feet. 

Advantage was taken of this excavation, to place five of the air ducts over the sewer, 
four of which have been constructed, and an opening left for the fifth one. 

The other ducts for this building at present terminate at the exterior walls, but are 
to be constructed and terminate as those in the eastern building. The Deputy Commis- 
sioner approved of all these works, and was aware of their extent before they were begun. 
The only order for this work to the contractor, was the order of the 28th February, 1860, 
No. 1, Exhibit No. 7, which applied to all the works they did, but the words of which 
referring to these works are, u and also to excavate for boiler houses, and other works re- 
quired in connection with the contract for heating and ventilation." 

On this order, the contractors performed all the excavations, constructed the air ducts 
and flues, and did everything which has been done in connection with the heating and 
ventilating. Although nothing is said in this order of rock excavation, or of the class of 
masonry to be used in the dutts or boiler houses, it was perfectly understood by Mr. 
Keefer that it was rock excavation, and that the masonry was to be of the class generally 
that it is, and as in our instructions, which were, to be in as complete a manner as it was 
possible for us to devise. (See letter 28th January, I860, No. 30,636.) 

When we were preparing our plans, it was understood the excavations were to be in 
?ock, and it was contrary to our expectation that earth boulders m hard pan excavations, 
to any «rtfnt, vtm foun4 on ftf litei of these bnjliUngi. Mf. (jlfth'i plan called fev $&f 



36 



ducts of brick, but wo never contemplated using brick, which was not suitable ; but he 
never dictated to us how they were to be constructed, if they had smooth surfaces. 

Before we commenced our air ducts, those in the Parliament buildings had been com- 
menced and their style of masonry determined upon, and in a letter from the department, 
we were directed to apply the same system of construction as had been adopted on the 
Parliament buildings. 

On all these circumstances, our authority was grounded for constructing these works. 

The excavations for these ducts were made chiefly during the summer of 1860. 

In January 18G1 we found the contractors preparing limestone for them, with the 
bed outside, or on the cant, as it is termed. This we forbid. On the 6th February, 1861, 
we addressed a letter to Mr. Page, who was then at Ottawa. We told him, that in going 
through the estimate for cold air ducts, in connection with the contract for heating and 
ventilation, on the Departmental buildings, it appeared to us that there might be some 
modification of the class of work in which they are proposed to be built, and we desired to 
confer with him on this subject, and wished either to call on him, or meet him at our 
office, which he pleased. And he replied concurring in our suggestions, and directing us 
to " at once take the necessary steps to stop all expenditure on works connected with the 
ducts, other than those required to carry out the mode of construction intimated in the 
letter above referred to. That is to say, that the sides and arches of the ducts, where 
they extend much beyond the respective lines of the buildings, are to be formed of a 
good class of coursed rubble masomy, laid, if need be, in cement mortar for 9 inches or 
a foot back from the face of the walls, except that the outer end of each, for a distance 
of 30 feet, may consist of dressed stone, of a similar class to those used for such parts of 
the ducts as are in the interior of the buildings." (See report and correspondence, Blue 
Book, 238 to 245) ; and the works were constructed on this more economical mode, so far 
as the Departmental buildings were concerned. 

We required the excavations for the foundation in the rock, to be two feet wider on 
each side, than the walls were to be. This is specified. We directed the excavation to 
be measured to that width, but there would be occasionally instances where a greater 
width would be made, which would be allowed, but we have the cross sections and measure- 
ments. We had only Mr. "Morris as clerk of works on the 19th April, 1860. We always 
thought Mr. Morris had too much work assigned him. No man could act efficiently as 
clerk of works to three such buildings. 

We did not ourselves, as architects, measure the work done for the progress estimates; 
we did not think it was our duty to do so. We took all our measurements from the clerk 
of works, but we satisfied ourselves of the extent of the work, by inspection, and we de- 
voted about three days to each estimate, to check the calculations, price the bills, aud see 
they were correct. We never ourselves actually measured the work done, we took it 
from the clerk of works. 

In estimating the work, where it was contract work, we used the schedule attached to 
the contract. In estimating for extra work we applied what we considered fair current 
rates. Hock excavation below 5 feet at the rate of $1.90 per cubic yard ; below 10 feet 
$2.25. Rock excavation in sewer for western building $2.25 ; below 5 feet $3.25 per 
cubic yard. Rubble limestone masonry per toise of 54 feet $8.00, including openings as 
solid. Labor on stone of boiler house 90 cents per foot, and the dressed stone Was always 
included with the rubble masonry. Clay excavation, 60 cents per yard below 5 feet ; 
hard-pan, $2.25 below 10 feet. Rock excavation in drain of west departmental building, 
below 10 feet, $5.00. Cut arches in boiler house, commencing with smoke flues on the 
soffit, $1.80 per foot ; labor to stone on cold air ducts, 37 cents ; labor on arches in cold air 
ducts, measured on the soffit $2.50 ; arches through divisional walls, measured in the same 
way, 40 cents ; chisselled arrases, 15 cents per lineal foot on quoins ; for carting earth from 
spoil bank for filling in walls, 25 cents, and 51 cents extra for extra haul. Excavating in 
sewers, under 10 feet, in the Departmental building, $6.00 per yard ; for brick, per thou- 
sand, in the wall, $10.50, 20 bricks to the cubic foot in common lime ; bricks laid in ce- 
ment $16,00 per thousand. In smoke flues openings were deducted. I have always, in 



.37 



the Province, measured brick at 20 bricks to the cubic foot. On the eastern Departmental 
building the prices were lower in some cases : rock excavation, from 10 to 15 feet, $3.00 
per yard j below 15 feet, 13.50 j below 20 feet, $4.75 ; below 25 feet $5.25. We allowed 
for Ncpean stone facing 21 cents in addition to limestone, measuring to the angle of splayed 
jambs to windows and doors, and one-third of the quoins. Plain cut face work on Ohio 
stone, 20 cents per foot j for sunk and chamered work, 25 cents ; centreing for arches, 
20 cents ; for common irou bars without lab'or, 7 cents per lb. 

In October, 18G0, after a correspondence with the Department, we allowed for brick 8 
$12.50 per thousand; iron stanchions and saddle-bars for windows, 182 cents per lb; Nepean 
stone, on new work, 35 cents ; large block stone in east drain, 30 cents ; dished bouchard 
work, 28 cents ; six inch stone flagging to cover drain 15 cents per foot, including work, 
stone, and labor ; fifteen inch glazed stoneware pipes, $1.00 per foot. From February, 
1861, brick work was valued at $13.00 per thousand ; but from October, 18G0, during 
the investigation by Mr. Page, there was a revision of prices between him and ourselves, 
some were increased, others diminished, but after this they continued all through at the 
following rates : — Brickwork, back to October, 1860, $13.80; and back from. October, 1860, 
$12.50 instead of $10.50 ; $9.36 per toise of 54 feet, 20 inch wall, measured as 2 feet wall, 
instead of $8.00, originally allowed. Ohio stone, cube measure 80 cents, built in wall ; 
plain rubbed, per foot superficial 26 cents, built in wall ; circular work, plain, 32 cents; 
sunk work, 34 cents ; circular, sunk, 42 cents ; moulded work, 46 cents ; circular moulded, 
60 cents ; face work on cold air ducts, a reduction of 5 cents, and in work measured 
according to these prices, openings of doors and windows were not to be deducted, — the 
additional work in cutting quoins and window jambs being considered equivalent. (See 
report, Blue Book, pages 303 to 307, and correspondence following). We submitted $1.50 
per foot, soffit only being measured, as a fair price for arches of ducts outside the building. 
And in reference to the dressed stone face in boiler houses, the stone was taken from the 
excavation for sewers on the right hand block, and for 5 feet above the footings, we pro- 
posed to pay for it at 90 cents, above that at 78 cents. This last reduction was made in 
reference to Mr. Page's letter. (Blue Book, page 307.) These prices having been 
examined by Mr. Page, we considered they should be embodied in the estimate we were 
making, as far as they were applicable. At the time, we considered them fair and reason- 
able as progress prices, and the estimates were made upon them until Mr. Killaly came. 
From the commencement of the works the prices of material and labour were constantly 
increasing; that of labour in consequence of the repeated strikes among the men, and of 
material in the increased demand for it. On our suggestion, contained in our letter to Mr. 
Page, the Chief Engineer, of the 27th February, 1861, eaves-troughs were dispensed 
with, and balconies over the doors substituted. Eaves troughs and vertical pipes were 
both dispensed with. The prices for some of the extra work, in the summer of 1860, 
were objected to by the Department, and a correspondence followed on the subject. Some 
were allowed, others not, and they stood open till Mr. Page's visit in the winter of 
1860-61. 

We fixed these prices chiefly on consultation with the architects of -the Parliament 
Buildings, and sometimes with Mr. Morris, and on our own personal knowledge of the 
value of the work, as well as local enquiry. I wish to refer to our letter of the 6th Octo- 
ber, 1860 ; also to our letter, of the 15th November, to the Department, and our letter of 
the 24th December, 1860, to Mr. Page, Chief Engineer of the Department. We never 
estimated in detail the extra expense of heating and ventilating, and we never estimated 
the extra and additional work done upon them. There is no estimate of the cost of the 
buildings, excepting that of Mr. Page and Mr. Killaly, and we made no measurements 
ourselves for these estimates. Mr. Pattison made the measurements for that estimate ; we 
considered Mr. Killaly a special commissioner, with special powers ; we understood from 
him that he had come to settle disputed points between the contractors and ourselves, and 
that he was also entrusted to deal with the question of compensation to the contractors 
for a breach of their contract on the part of the Government, and that he was authorised 
to enter into the question of compensation to them. The contractors submitted to him 
their claims and grievances in respect of the works. He requested us to meet him at his 
office, and we did. 



38 



He proposed to get Mr. Pattison, accompanied by some person on the part of the Con- 
tractors, to measure the work on a mode of measurement which had been adopted con- 
jointly, and upon which we were consulted. We understood the measurement was made 
in accordance with this mode, but we had nothing do with it, or with the measurements 
from June, 1861. We went over the claims of prices for the work as made by the Con- 
tractors. Many of these prices we objected to, and they were reduced, and some rejected 
altogether. Those reduced were so, to the amount mentioned in his report. If we had 
been consulted as to the settlement, we should have said measure and value of the whole work 
was the fair mode, at the prices we had been chiefly accustomed to [use, and which 
we settled with Mr. Page. We considered measurement and value as the fair mode, be- 
cause the contract had been lost in the amount of extra and additional work. 

Mr. Killaly thought it would be better to give compensation to the Contractors, in the 
increased price for their work and materials. He decided upon allowing it upon his mode 
of settlement. 

Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., put in the prices they claimed. What was allowed was 
put by the side of their claim as an equitable compromise. He got all the information he 
could from us, and from the contractors, as to the value of labor and material. He made 
the estimate and the value of the work done, and to be done, on his own judgment, and 
when his estimate was made, he requested us to sign it, and the measurer also. The head- 
ing states that that estimate is based upon the rates of prices and the principles of mea- 
surement for past and future works arrived at and approved of by Mr. Killaly. 

We signed that estimate certifying it to be a correct statement of the amount of ma- 
terial in the building, and that the gross amount, as carried out from the data given, is 
correct. We do not assume the responsibility of its being correct in detail, nor can we 
assume the responsibility of saying what is du« to the contractors for damages for breach of 
contract on the part of the government. We assume that the measurements are correct, 
on the principles Mr. Killaly laid down, but we do not assent to some of the items of his 
prices. 

We do not certify to the measurement, for we never measured the work while in pro' 
gress or afterwards. We only took the measurement as correct by Pattison, on Mr- 
Killaly's principles. 



1 8th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT: 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau, 

Thomas Stent, — Examination continued. 

I consider the measuring of beds and joints as the only true mode of measuring 
masonry j that is the universal practice in England, and in my own practice, but I object 
to measuring openings in face work. 

The local custom is not to measure beds and joints. In our letter to the Department, 
we stitei that we thought this the fair way, but we knew it was contrary to the rules of the 
Department, the local custom in this place, and the custom in the Province. 

I considered the prices fixed by Mr, Killaly in excess of prices allowed under ordi- 
nary circumstances, The question of the prices allowed by Mr. Killaly as the modo of 
0Omp?oigif§ for damages wuh what I considered out of the ordinary courge, 



m 



Since the adjournment yesterday, I have considered the matter over, and offer the 
following as my matured evidence on the subject of my connection, and that of my partner, 
with Mr. Kiilaly's visit, viz: — In fixing prices for progress estimates, for extra and ad- 
ditional works, I adopted what I considered a prudent precaution in giviug prices which 
were below the real value of the work ; the object of this was to arrive at a certain price, to 
be paid the contractor on progress work done, at the end of each month. 

I conceive this, in certain circumstances, as in large works of this kind, where a con- 
tract is taken at manifestly low prices, and the extra work precedes it, or is in a larger 
quantity, to be our duty, to prevent the contractors from taking advantages, as they might 
probably do of a large estimate, to dictate to the employer or the architects, or refuse to 
proceed with their contract work. 

We found it impossible in this case to fix the value of work, for the reasons stated, 
viz : the constantly varying cost of production, both of labour and material. 

When Mr. Page called on me for my opinion, I considered that but little contract 
work was done ; and, as the price paid for this contract work was shown by actual measure- 
ment and calculation to be very far telowits actual cost, I considered that, in justice to 
the government, we could not at that time materially increase the prices we had been 
allowing. 

If we had done so, it would have been an inducement, or premium, to them to abandon 
their contract. The constant complaining, sometimes to ourselves and sometimes to the 
Department, led us to this conclusion. 

We were not required by Mr. Page to establish final prices, but to give our opinion 
as to whether those originally paid were fair, and should continue to be adopted. For pro- 
gress work a few as stated were raised, and some few reduced by us. This had reference 
to a contract in operation, and which we desired to preserve intaot. 

Mr. Page states in his report, that, as from a large portion of the walls being covered 
with snow, he could not form a decided opinion upon prices, and when the works was sus- 
pended by the government, we felt that the whole case was reversed. The contract which 
we had cherished was abandoned, and the contractors, who had hitherto been controlled by 
us, had the upper hand, and the precaution which had guided us in determining prices 
no longer existed, as the contractor would no doubt be entitled to compensation. 

Mr. Killaly then called upon us, and stated that he had come to Ottawa, with a view 
to settle these long disputed points, and wished to know the nature of the differences exist- 
ing ; that he hoped to be able to arrange thematterat once satisfactorily to the government 
and the contractors ; and requested us, in conjunction with himself, to establish prices for 
extra aud additional work, which should embrace the question of compensation to con- 
tractors, and be at the same time a final settlement. He took into consideration all the 
difficulties surrounding the question, and decided they could be arranged by adopting a 
uniform system of measurement, and giving prices to embrace the amount of compensation. 

The whole aspect of the question appeared to us to be chauged. We had then to go 
into the whole matter ab initio, and fix prices based upon the actual cost of the work, for 
all additional and extra work. The system of measurement we considered most applicable 
was the English system, that of measuring beds and joints to cut stone, and surface mea- 
surement for all face work. The latter had been done throughout. There were at the 
same time many explanations made by the contractors, evidence given of the cost of differ- 
ent classes of work, which had not been previously laid before us. 

We were compelled to admit that in some cases we had not sufficiently considered the 
extreme labour and cost of some portions of the work. We were, moreover, given to 
understand that the settlement proposed by Mr. Killaly would include a waiver on the 
part of the contractor of claims for damages for the stoppage of the work, there being no 
power given in the contract to either Commissioner 01 Architects to suspend the works ; 
and on that account also, we were induced to take a more liberal view of prices than we 
should otherwise have done, coupled, as before stated; with the question of compensation. 



40 



It was Mr. Killaly's wish to preserve the contract intact. In view, however, of the 
almost insurmountable difficulties surrounding- this course, we should have preferred adopt- 
ing a system of measurement and value applied to the whole, as stated by us ; and I fully 
believe that such a course, adopting fair average rates, would result in an amount similar 
to that arrived at by Mr. Killaly. 

I consider that the amouut of additional work is so great, and so ramified throughout 
the whole building, that the contract is entirely absorbed and lost, and that therefore the 
whole should be measured, and the contract sum deducted. 

If a man contracts to work by a certain plan, and that plan is so entirely abandoned 
that it is impossible to trace the contract and say to what part of the work it shall be 
applied, in such case the workman shall be permitted to charge for the whole of the work 
by measure and value, as if no contract at all had been made. 

The contract plan showed the foundation to go only four feet below the ground line. 
All the work under that is additional to the contract; and all the work connected with the 
heating and ventilating, which includes the excavation for the air ducts, the increased 
depth of sewers in consequence of the extra ten feet in depth of the boiler house, and the 
enlargement of the boiler house ; the excavation in the foundation walls below the assumed 
line ; the masonry in the drains, ducts, and foundation walls, below the line shown on the 
contract plans ; the altering of most of the foundations of the division walls, to allow the 
air flues to be built; the building of the extra flues in the division walls; the excavation 
of the basement, and the introduction of rooms therein ; the facing the whole with Nepean 
stone, and the increased size of the east wing of the eastern departmental building, from 
2280 feet superficial, to 4160 feet superficial ; the increased length of the north-west wing 
of the western departmental building; increased chimney flues from tli3 new rooms in the 
basement; increased size of chimney tops through the roof; the smoke flues from the 
boiler houses; two new extra air shafts and the others enlarged ; a part of the principal 
ventaduct. 

Whenever the stone which came from the foundations was fit for the foundation walls; 
it was allowed to be used. It was so intended in the specification. It was the right of 
the contractor and a saving to the government, as it prevented the expense of its removal. 
I cannot tell what proportion the extra work bore to the contract work. In every esti- 
mate it was considerably in excess of the contract work. I have no means, and never had, 
of telling how much was contract, and how much was extra work. 

While very considerable progress had been made in the eastern building, the men 
were still working at the excavation of the western one ; and the works in the two were not 
kept separate till Mr. Page came, so I cannot tell the relative proportion of each kind of 
work. When we gave our prices to Mr. Page, we knew that several of the prices were 
low. Two of the principal items, brick and stone, were put under their value, the rest 
we considered fair at the time ; but when Mr. Killaly came, the whole circumstances 
became changed in the way I stated. Mr. Killaly gave his instructions to Mr. Pattison to 
measure the work, without consulting us. He told us what they were. 

We understood that no estimate would be recognized by the department, without our 
signature, and I imagined that in his desire to preserve the contract, he would enforce all 
its provisions, one of which was that we should sign the estimate. We signed it because 
we thought he had arrived at a final settlement with the contractors, based on his authority, 
and he having done so, it became our duty to sign it, as we had all the others. I may 
mention that at an early stage of the work we had declined to sign some day bills, and 
payment on them was refused, and this led us to suppose no estimate would be recognized 
without our signature. I imagine it was understood when we signed that estimate, that 
it was to give it effect with the department. We did not make that estimate. Pattison 
made it on Mr. Killaly's instructions, on his principles, and at prices which in part we 
assented to, and in part objected to ; but our view was overruled and the prices fixed on 
his new scale, which, as we understood, his instructions authorized him to do. Mr. Killaly 
in fact made two estimates ; the first we signed in Quebec, the second in Toronto. We 
thought he had authority to settle, and had settled the whole matter, aud thinking S3, we 
had no objection to acquiesce in it, 



41 



I thiuk we are entitled to 5 per cent, on the outlay. The original agreement was 
made with Mr. Keefer at this rate, and we never acquiesced in the Order in Council limit- 
ing our compensation. We believe we cannot compel the Government to alter the Order 
in Council, but we expect them to treat our claim as a matter of equity and justice, and 
according to the rule of the profession. I think this style of building is decidedly adapted 
to this climate. Our plans simply provided for heating and ventilating in the ordinary 
way. The ordinary fire places are retained — one to every room. The system introduced 
for heating and ventilating is well adapted to the purpose; we did not contemplate so elabo- 
rate a system, but I think it the best that can be adopted. As regards the durability of 
the Nepean stone, we thought the opinion of Sir William Logan unimpeachable, and our 
own examination of it confirmed that opinion ; I have no doubt of its durability. As 
to the relative value of this stone, as compared with the limestone originally contemplated, 
I say that when we estimated the difference at first at 21 cents, it was fair, and if the stone 
had been got from the quarry then opened it would have been enough. The stone there 
was in beds, and easily broken square, but the stone from the next quarry did not rise in 
beds, required to be blasted, and broken with plug and feather, and had to be worked on 
the beds and joints ; I now think it worth fifty cents over and above the value of the 
limestone. I estimate a cubic foot of the quarry to face a foot of the wall. The average 
load would be 20 feet, and one load a day per team, the distance 11 or 12 miles. 
The price for a team per day is 15 shillings to 17s. 6d. 1 do not know how many feet a 
man can dress in a day at the quarry. 

The wiudows in front to light the corridors were ordered to conform t) the style of 
windows put in the basement where no excavations were made ; they were originally 
intended to be the same all round as in the rear. Mr. Keefer visited Ottawa, in connec- 
tion with these works, on the 6th October and 20th December, 1859 ; and on the 11th 
April, 21st June, 1st September, and 6th November, 1860; and the 23rd May, 1861 ; on 
the last occasion he was accompanied by Mr. Rubidge, the Assistant Engineer. Mr. Rose 
was at the works on the 20th December, 1859, and on the 5th July, 1860. We took him 
all over the works, and showed him the excavation for sewers for both buildings. We 
drew his attention especially to the extra price paid over that on the eastern Departmental 
building, on excavating the rock on the western one. It was then under discussion to 
appoint another clerk of works, and we were asked to write an official letter recommending 
Pelham. Mr. Page visited the works on the 18th December, 1860, and remained till the 
beginning of March, 1861. Mr. Keefer never disapproved of anything that was going 
on. On his visit, on the 23rd of May, 1861, he introduced, by letter, Mr. Pattison, as 
measurer, who has acted ever since. He then directed us to suspend all external work 
connected with the heating and ventilating, and all work which could be properly delayed, 
except to complete the ducts in the excavation for the main sewer to the Departmental 
buildings, and we did it. Mr. Cauchon visited the works en the 22nd July, 1861, and 
on the 30th October. Mr. Killaly, came on the 26th September, 1861, and remained one 
week, and again on the 19th October, and remained for tbrej or four weeks. 

Before the works were begun at all I and my partner h id lime kilns in the neighbor- 
hood, which were conducted by our agent. When the contractors took these works they 
made arrangements to get lime from kilns in Gloucester but it turned out that they could 
not supply them fast enough. They went to our agent, bef >re they knew we owned the 
kilns, and got lime. When it came to our knowledge we thought it over, and came to the 
conclusion there would be no impropriety in our supplying lime, especially when we knew 
that engineers connected with the Government had supplied cement, lumber, and pressed 
brick for Government works ; they got lime, more or less, from us during the progress of 
the work. The mortar made from our lime is unexceptionable, and the highest price 
ever paid was 15 cents a bushel, delivered, and we never sold a bushel to any one else for 
less than 16 or 17 cents. The price was arranged by the person in charge for us, in conse- 
quence of the quantity taken. 

We have a record of the times detailed drawings were asked for and supplied. 
Numerous complaints had been made to the Department, and we replied to them to the 
satisfaction of the Department, and the contractors were referred back to us. I believe 
6 



42 



there was no reason for these complaints. We declined to give the detailed drawings 
except as the work proceeded. 

The cut stone has been set in putty ; oil putty is not meant, but fine lime putty, made 
with fine sand ; and this has been used. The brickwork is specified to be Flemish bond, 
but we did not insist on this. The bricks were of various sizes and was an impediment to 
this ; they are the ordinary bond ; there is little difference in the expense ; Flemish bond 
is a header and stretcher alternately ; English bond is a heading course, every third or fifth 
eourse. Fire bricks and Toronto pressed bricks were dispensed with in the record and 
vault rooms, with the approval of the Department ; they are built of Nepean rubble, lined 
with Brockville bricks ; the difference, if auy, was to be deducted. Fire brick and 
Toronto brick could not be got. They were to be arched, but since the fire-proof system 
they are covered with iron joists and concrete, or arched at the contractor's pleasure. 

When iron has been used instead of arches, no extra should be allowed for fireproof- 
ing these vaults, and none was allowed so far as I know. There was no order ever given. 
The contractor did as he pleased. There are no chases in the walls for pipes for water, 
or bells as specified. There is no plan yet considered for their introduction. I should 
have all these covered with a hinged flap, to be accessible at all times. I know the fire- 
proofing of these safe rooms has not been charged or paid for by the Government. The 
wall of the hot air chamber along the corridors is one brick and a half thick, and arched. 
The arch is filled with concrete to the flour. The jiron j oists rest upon the wall of the 
chamber, and do not reach the principal wall All this was made to save expense. It was 
not measured in the progress estimate of Mr. Killaly. Mr. Killaly's estimate was a. progress 
estimate intended to settle the principle and mode of measurement, and the quantities of 
extra and additional work done, but not as to work done under the coutract accurately. 
The first of Mr. Killaly's estimates was but a partial one ; the last one, final to the extent I 
have just mentioned, as I understood it. The porch to tho Governor's entrance is built 
under the contract, modified by the Deputy Commissioner. 

The design of this was not furnished to allow the work to go up with the buildiugs, 
but it was only delayed till its design was settled by us. Norn- of the basement walls are 
of unnecessary thickness. They were set out by the clerk of works, with our sanctiou. 
There is no order for cut and picked arches for the air ducts in the corridor wall. We 
ordered it as a matter of discretion, which was approved of by the Deputy Commissioner. 
Ohio cut stone dressiugs for register frames were used under the order of the Department. 
I refer to our letter of the 15th June 1861, No. 37,365, sanctioning this. Similar letters 
and sanction apply to the porch at the Governor's entrauce, and to the arches at the stair 
cases, instead of girders. 

The stone dressings in the corridor were ordered by us, and are extra, without any 
order from the Department. We assumed the responsibility of ordering them, to give 
effect to the entrance. Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., claim the Ohio stone in the quoins 
as extra, in their memorandum to Mr. Killaly. We contended they were not extra, as 
they were included in the general term " dressing/' on the buildings, and farther on, as 
dressing on the external front. (See specification, Blue Book, pages 104 and 105.) Mr 
Killaly overruled our view and allowed the quoins as extra. We had previously reported 
to the Department that we did not consider them as extra. The corbelling of cornice was 
allowed extra by Mr. Killaly. We did not think it was extra. Extra scaffolding was 
claimed by the contractors. We contended it ought not to be allowed as we never specified 
for building overhand. The record rooms have external walls, and although English fire 
brick is specified, they could not have been used with propriety. This I overlooked, for 
there ought to have been a deduction, and there will be, on the final estimate. Mr. 
Killaly made no deduction for this. 

The local custom is to measure any wall less than two feet as two feet. I would 
measure cut stone with the rubble work, but not allow openings, but in these buildings all 
the openings in masonry have been measured in compliance with local custom here. I 
justify it as a compensation for plumbing and forming jambs. I object to measuring 
masonry in ducts as solid, as the contractors claim it. [n measuring the Nepean 
faces, I should deduct openings. I believe Mr. Killaly allowed it, but I refer to 



43 



Pattison's instructions. I refer to a published letter in the blue book, page 307, from 
ourselves to Mr. Page. It is there stated that we have not deducted openings for doors 
and windows. Our letter is that we have deducted nett openings. We allowed 20 bricks 
to the cubic foot. We did allow an extra on brick arches, and splayed work. We con- 
curred in the English mode of measurement of cut stone, as stated in the blue book, page 
382. We agreed to the mode of measuring centreing. We concurred in the allowance 
made for excavating by Mr. Killaly. The felting of the roofs was extra, and we had the 
approval of the Commissioner to have it put under the slates, to equalize the temperature, 
and assist ventilation. We ordered the rubbling of the Ohio stone. The contractors claim 
extra, but it ought not to be allowed, as in our opinion the specification provided for it. 

The sloped roof was to be boarded close, and battened, not grooved. It was suggested 
to us that tongued and grooved would be better; we agreed to it, and the contractor was to 
do it without extra charge; we were not aware that some of the rafters were 18 to 20 
inches apart instead of 14 inches as specified. The Clerk of Works must answer this. 
The record rooms were to have the iron joists 14 inches apart, by the original contract. 
When fire-proofing was specified for the rest of the buildings, the iron joists were to be 
20 inches apart. We gave no directions to the contractors, and if they put them 20 inches 
in the record rooms, it was contrary to the specification, and without any order from us, 
and ought to be deducted from them. The heading of Mr. Garth's schedule of prices is the 
same as the headings of the other schedules. The prices are said to apply to alterations, 
additions, or works dispensed with. 

We apply his schedule to extra work, but we do not apply the schedule to the extra 
work of Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., for the reason already stated, that the schedule 
was not to apply to Mr. MeGreevy's extra or additional work, as admitted by the Deputy 
Commissioner, and as Mr. Rose admits as well as Mr. Page. We suggested to the depart- 
ment to dispense with gutters and conducting pipes. They were not used in the Parlia- 
ment Buildings, and we thought they were better without them, and after discussion it 
was agreed to by the Department. 

We gave an approximate estimate to Mr. Killaly of what would be required to finish 
the buildings at the prices he fixed, but we made no detail of it. The balcony to the 
south front entrance of the western Departmental Building, was sanctioned by a letter of 
the Department, 15th January, 18G1, in lieu of a chimney on the roof of the central pro- 
jection of the east front of the same building. (See No. 37226.) There was a specimen 
wall built by us, with the sanction of the Department, in order to show the class of work 
iu limestone we required for the buildings. It was being built by the best masons in 
town. When built it had not the character of the work we required, and we removed it. 
This was before the tenders were given in. I directed Mr. Morris to have one built of 
the character required, and it was built, but not in time to show the contractors. Mr. 
Morris built a wall of Nepean stone to show the contrast between the two, and as a speci- 
men, and this was actually built before any Nepean was used in the buildings. 

The contractors cannot complain justly that we required a better wall than was 
specified, but we think the walls were built well in every respect. I understood it was 
always intended to use sandstone instead of limestone. It was not, I believe, ever seriously 
intended to use limestone. 

Mr. Morris's competency was of the highest character, but we objected to the mode 
of his appointment. Mr Hutchison is a good practical mason, but as this is the first 
building he ever superintended, of the kind, and his experience was local, he was unable 
to give an opinion on this class of work. He was a good practical builder. 



44 



20th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT '. 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Thomas Stent, — Examination continued. 

I objected also to the power assumed 05 him under his instructions. I have ordered 
him to do work in a certain way, and he would refuse, (See correspondence between 
ourselves, Hutchison, and the Department, Nos. 8, 9, 10,) saying the Department held 
him responsible, not us. 

I refer to orders about construction of the roof, about which he was not competent to 
give an opinion. We superintended the eastern building. His supervision of the 
building was highly satisfactory, and the building is 01" the first class. 

Mr. Pelham was 'the other clerk of works. He is a carpenter by trade, a pains- 
taking man, desirous of carrying out his work to the best of his ability. He is competent 
to do his work, but required more supervision than Mr. Hutchisou, in the masonry branch. 

Their appointments were made in respect of the one being a builder, and the other a 
carpenter. They are quite competent to make the required measurements. 

Mr. Pattison came here about the 1st d*>y of June, 1861. A copy of his instructions 
from the Deputy Commissioner was sent to me : (See it marked, exhibit No. 11.) 

I will now define our duties as architects, as we uaderstood them, with reference 
to these buildings. When an architect is appointed to carry on a building, the usual 
practice is for him to appoint a clerk of works, or clerks of works where more are neces- 
sary. He is to be under the entire control of the architect, to carry out his orders. 
The ^architect is to prepare all contract drawings and specifications; all detailed and 
working drawings from time to time, also one copy of the contract drawings, for the use 
of the building ; to see that the different classes of work are properly and efficiently done ; 
to exercise a general supervision on the whole work, either by himself or the clerk of 
works. 

If the architect lives at a distance from the building, he should require reports from time 
to time from the clerk of works. If these arrangements are carried out, it is his province 
to assume the responsibility of the correctness of the work, and to certify to its final com- 
pletion ; he is to certify progress estimates upon a per-centage on the value of the work 
from tir^e to time done. 

If the clerk of works is appointed otherwise, it is difficult to define the precise duties 
of each. Practically, I have accepted the duties, as if the appointment had been regularly 
made. I accept the responsibility of all the orders given for the work, but not the respon- 
sibility of any order given by the clerk of works without consulting us, and the respon- 
sibility of the class, or character of the work generally. The clerks of works felt that 
they had the power of carrying out their own orders, and sometimes did it. 

It is not the duty of the architect to measure the work for progress estimates, but to 
take them from the clerk of works, satisfying himself of their correctness ; but at the close 
of the work, he should be able to speak thoroughly as to their correctness. I do not say 
he would be expected to make the actual measurements, but to test the measurements of 
his clerk of works, so as to satisfy himself that they were correct. This applies to extra 
work of every class He is required to certify the final completion of the contract work, 
and that it is done according to contract, and to make up a debtor and creditor account of 
every |Wbg, which shall be final 



45 



We did not ourselves measure for the progress estimates, but we satisfied ourselves of 
their correctness in the way I have stated. The architect is entitled by the rule of the 
profession, to 2$ per cent, on the amount of the contract, to be paid when the contract is 
si°ued • a'ud further to 2 J per cent, on the progress estimates, as issued to the contractor, 
and 5 per ccut on all extras, for which he ought to prepare all drawiDgs and specifications, 
and superintend the work. The first 2$ per cent paid, includes the plans for the contract, 
and a copy of them for the use of the building. 

He should be paid his travelling and all other extraneous expenses, in carrying out 
the work, and for all additional plans that may be required, and a final measurement of 
extras and additional work. 

As regards the order in council about our remuneration, we never considered ourselves 
as bound by it; we remonstrated against it, as Mr. Fuller stated, and Mr. Rose wished us 
not to press it at the time. In Mr. Killaly's estimate, as I understood, all the ventilating 
flues were not extra. There were to be two in each room by the contract. I did not un- 
derstand the 9th clause of the contract as binding the contractors to make heating flues 
for „\lr. Garth's plan. I considered ail the flues his system introduced as extra. 

There have been one or two cases of extra walling by mistake, but they have not 
beo l allowed to the contractor. One part was removed, the other remains, but was not 
allowci for. Some of the daily bills of work, in the early part of the work, were for 
pumping. 

Som2 of the brick work for jambs and linings of windows, was built up before the 
heating an 1 ventilating plan came. These had to be removed for its introduction. The 
work was charged as day work, as was the construction of the chimney in the eastern 
building. The joisting is to be allowed for by the ton. They are all according to the size 
we gave. There are some division walls left down in the western Departmental building. 
We understood from the Deputy Commissioner that some re-arrangement of the rooms was 
contemplated, and we left the walls down, and the joisting out, for this reason. The con- 
tractors do not gain by there being no joists against the walls. 

The walls have not been made thicker to sustain the iron joists, except in a few cases 
in the attics. I put in a letter .'rem Mr. Killaly of the 28th December, 1861, on this sub- 
ject, Exhibit No. 12. I do no! approve of a key going through the queenpost. My plan is a 
wedge underneath. I disapprove of cutting more than is necessary. It was in this respect 
that Hutchison wished to carry out his own views against ours, of which we complained. 

The roof is carried out according to the drawings. The iron strap is weakened by the 
hole. The straps are not or the size specified ; they were allowed to be less, as the specified 
size was unnec3ssary I say that wo have been actuated by a sense of duty in everything 
we have done, and a desire to advance the interests of the Government, by whom we were 
employed. There may have, and loubtless have been errors in judgment, in the conduct 
of these works, such as our matured experience would lead us to correct, if we had to go 
over the ground i^ain, but I believe there have been as few errors in construction as ever 
arose in works oi their magnitude. There never was a building carried out, in which 
another professional man would not iiscover errors, and things done contrary to what his 
opiuion would adept ; but though it be so, they are but matters of opinion after all, and 
the opinions of men of equal experience may be considered equally valuable though they 
do not perfectly accord. 

There was no levelling uf the walls at the assumed foundation line, to ascertain the ad- 
ditional work, under these assumed lines ; it would have been impossible to do it without 
stopping the work, fjr the material was piled round, and in the way. The stone from the 
excavation was used on the building, and estimated in the progress estimates as rubble 
work, but the stone itself in the Departmental buildings, so far as I know, was not esti- 
mated for, as material delivered, until it was in the walls. I think the air ducts exterior 
to the walls were done cheaper than if they had been left until the completion of the 
buildings, The boiler hquses had to be drained to allow the work to proceed^ and when 
the excavation was made £ it was better to aongtruet the air duets over it, then to fill It up 
194 4*i tt %&Av fef &#»? A^} $8 3 ^n^Hsiiloa with &f?» KeefeMUi* waj*4eoWed tooil 



46 



and if it had not been done, the blasting of the deep rock before the buildings were done 
would have had an injurious effect upon them. 

The excavation could not have remained open during the progress of the work. 
The east wing of the eastern Departmental building was not all reckoned extra ; only 
what was in excess of the original plan. The papers I distributed to intending con- 
tractors while the plans lay open in our office for inspection, were printed forms of tender 
and schedules attached. My impression always was, that no tender would be accepted 
without a schedule. 

The schedule Mr. Morris and I made for Mr. McG-reevy's tender, was done by Mr. 
Keefer's orders for the Departmental buildings. Mr. McGreevy knew nothing about it, 
so far as I know, till it was made. 

By the specification, the relieving arches were to be of Malone stone, and sandstone 
of another colour. If the limestone had been used for the buildings, Nepean or Perth 
sandstone would have done with the Malone stone. But when Nepean stone was used for 
the buildings, then some other stone was required to be put alternately with the Malone 

stone. 

The contractors informed me that they would, as they were getting them from Ma- 
lone, get all of that stone if we assented to it. We did so, but not as extra. 



(Signed,) Thomas Stent. 



John Grist, sworn,— 

I am an architect by profession, served my time with Mr. Thomas, in Toronto, com- 
mencing in 1847. I was appointed by the Commissioner of Public Works as clerk of 
works on the Parliament Building from the 28th June, 1860, and I continued till the stop- 
page of the works in October, 1861. I was employed on the Parliament Building exclu- 
sively. When I came, part of the excavation for the foundations of the tower was done j 
the foundations under the Legislative Council up to the level of the contract footings ; 
the foundations of the boiler house built up about six feet ; |the*excavation for the main 
tower was going on, and the excavation for the main sewer and the north drains had been 
commenced ; this was the state of works when I came here. I was under the orders of 
Mr. Morris exclusively ; I was not under the orders of the architects except through him. 
I was employed the first three days drawing the sketch for a tablet for the Chaudiere 
Bridge. I was then sent into the office to make myself acquainted with the plans of the 
Parliament Building; this occupied about three days. The plans of the buildings were in 
au office, open to the contractors and clerks of works. The contractors, before and after I 
came, caused tracings of the plans to be made for their own use, but the plans always lay 
in the office open for reference. I then went on the building. My instructions were 
to measure up for the monthly estimate for June ; my instructions were to measure the 
masonry in the walls as I found it ; I was to measure the excavations as I found them, 
whether they exceeded the width required or not. When I made the measurements, I 
came into the office to assist Mr. Morris in making up the estimates, and he then informed 
me that the rock taken from the excavation was to be measured as stone delivered for the 
rubble work ; it was then put in the estimate as material delivered. In every estimate is 
shown the whole quantity of every class of work, estimated from the commencement of 
the work. That estimate showed that 10,829 cubic yards of rock, in all, had been 
estimated, valued at $15,197.23, and 7,992 toises of rubble stone, at 87 cents, 
delivered, which all came from the foundations, as I believed. I was not aware 
of any other rubble stone delivered ; I do not remember even seeing, till after 
that time, any rubble stone brought from any other place for the Parliament Building. 
About the beginning of July I was jgent to superintend the work, to see that the walls were 






47 



properly filled and mortar put under the atones, the walls bonded, and the work executed 
in a proper workmanlike manner. I contiuued at this till the next monthly estimate was 
made out, after the end of July. I took the measurements for July. I measured the rock 
excavated during that month, all the walls which had been built, and all the work done 
My measurements were as accurate as I could make them ; either Mr. MeGreevy or hij 
clerk assisted me. 

From the time I came the foundation walls were gradually extended. I laid none of 
the foundations out at any time ; I was never directed to do it, that I remember. There 
were no clerks of works on the Parliament Building but Mr. Morris and me. When I 
came, the greater portion of the work marked within the black line, now pointed out to me 
on plan D as the foundation laid out by Mr. Morris, had been laid out. Mr. McGreevy's 
foreman, Mr. Haughy, laid out all the foundations which Mr. Morris did not lay out. I 
did not direct the laying them out ; I may have assisted occasionally but not as a rule ; I 
gave no directions as to the thickness, of the wpIIs or their position ; I did observe 
they were unusually thick, and I made an observation to Mr. Haughy about this ; he 
replied they allowed something to come and go on, for setting out the upper walls ; there 
was no leave asked or given to. make them other than contract walls, except in one case, in 
the air duct in the north corridor of the east wing. Mr. Morris allowed the foundation 
wall under this duct to be solid, instead of two walls under the bottom of that duct; after 
this the whole of the foundations of these ducts under the corridors of both wings were 
built partly solid. The walls, as they are found now, were built under the direction of 
Mr. Haughy, so far as I know. There was no attention paid to my remonstrance. In 
measuring the walls for the progress estimates, I measured the work just as I found it I 
say again, I gave no directions about the thickness of these walls, while they were going 
on. I was then on the works when the walls were levelled up to the basement floor line. 



2 1 ft AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau 

Adjourned examination to allow Mr. Grist to examine the walls of the Parliament 
Building, and mark their thickness and position on the ground plan spoken of by Messrs. 
Morris and Fuller. 



•22nd AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

John Grist, — Examination continued. 

I never made any measurement of the quantity of work done under the assumed 
foundation line, and none of the quantities of woTk to the basement line. I was 
present when the basement floor walls were set off on the foundation walls at the 
basement floor line. I found some of the foundation walls did not correspond in thick- 
ness and position with the basement walls. 



48 



It was intended by the plans and specifications that the footings of the foundation 
walls should be four inches thicker on each side than these walls themselves. I acted as 
clerk of works under the direction of Mr. Morris, superintending the quality of the work, 
on the whole of the Parliament building, until the foundation walls were built up to the 
basement floor line, and some of them above that. When the basement floor walls came 
to be set out on the foundation walls, it was found that mistakes had been made in the 
thickness and position of the foundation walls, and my duties were afterwards changed. 

I will now speak of the mistakes in these foundation walls, and I refreshed my 
memory by examining them yesterday, and taking some of their thicknesses and positions. 
I found the greater number wrong, but some are right. They vary from a few inches to 
five feet in excess of what they ought to have been. The figures in red on the plan mark- 
ed D, are my figures, and show the thicknesses of the walls, as I now, on examination and 
measurement find them. The exterior basement floor walls were to be 3 feet 5 inches. 
The interior from 9 inches to 3 feet thick. 

About the 1st day of June, 1861, I got a letter from Mr. Keefer, dated the 29th 
May, 1861, which I put in. It is published in the Blue Book, page 347, marked Exhibit 
No. 13, and about the same time I got a letter dated 1st June, from Messrs. Fuller and 
Jones, which I also put in, with the sketch showing the portion of the work I was 
to superintend. The letter is marked Exhibit No. 14, and the plan is marked E. From 
this time my duties were confined to that part of the building marked in that plan. Mr. 
Morris aud Mr. Larose had also assigned to them separate portions of the building. 
When any one of the three was absent, one of the others superintended the work. T did 
part of Mr. Morris's work in his absence. The basement floor walls, where finished to the 
ground floor, did not correspond with the intended ground floor walls. Some were taken 
down and rebuilt, the rebuilding allowed to the contractor as extra days' work. Some 
were corbelled over, and to do this Nepean flagging was used, and the stone allowed extra 
to the contractors. Iron joists under the wall were allowed as extra. Mr. Fuller gave the 
order to corbel it over, and I pointed it out to Mr. Bowes, who measured it. The exterior 
ground floor walls were shown on the contract plan to be 2 feet 6 inches ; the interior ones 
from 9 inches to 2 feet 6 inches ; the library walls 3 feet at the thinnest parts. The 
walls of the ground floor generally corresponded with the basement floor walls. A door 
way was wrong, but was discovered before they had advanced far, and was taken down, 
and rebuilt, by extra days' work, allowed to the contractor. 

The walls on the ground floor corresponded with plans given me by Mr. Fuller, but 
these were altered plans, and did not correspond with the contract plans. They had been 
changed to admit of the heating and ventilating system. I had reason to complain of the 
contractors not doing their work properly. They were not bonding the walls, and putting 
mortar under the stones in the foundations. They did it right when I r iquired them, 
and it is as I'required it. The proper way to conduct the building of walls, is to build 
the cross walls at the same time as the exterior walls are built, so as to tie them, and when 
a stone wall is to be lined with brick, they should not be built at the same time, but the 
brick lining was not left out by my orders. It is a disputed point among architects, 
whether brick lining is best built with the stone wall, or afterwards. My opinion is that 
it is better built afterwards. When the inside bricks ware built they were fair inside bricks ; 
they have gone by exposure. It was intended to cover them properly the first winter, 
and it was the contractors duty to do it, but they were not properly covered, and the wet 
and frost caused them to give way on the ground floor walls. Some of the bricks used are 
not according to the specification ; but bricks according to the specification, would have 
been injured by the exposure I speak of. The best bricks we ever got were from Three 
Rivers, and these gave way the first winter in the lining of the boiler house. I do not 
find the brick walls now much worse than they were the first winter. The brick work, is 
worse than when I left it, but the sum of $100 would repair all that is worse. If the per- 
manent roof had been put on last winter, the injury to the brick work which I observe to 
have been done, would not have occurred ; but that is the part which I say $100 would 
repair. 

I do not know what becama of the brick rejected by Mr. Morris ; some was removed, 
I know. 1 omitted to mention that wliera break* were shown for ohimneya, it was cheaper 



49 



and easier for the contractor to make the whole wall solid, than to form the break ; as the 
stone which came from the excavation, was lying at hand, in heaps in the way, and was 
rough. As far as I know, the foundation walls were built of stone taken from the exca- 
vation. The walls are of good masonry. I do not know who ordered the foundation of 
the main tower to be solid ; but, as a duct runs through it, I suppose it would be cheaper 
for Mr. McGrecvy to make it solid than to form and face the foundation up to the height 
of the duct. There is no need for the foundations being solid, or being wider than the 
plan showed. It would be proper in an earth foundation, not on a rock as this is. I have 
a plan of this main tower foundation, which I made at the time ; it is put in, marked F. 
The masonry is solid to the outer line on this plan 42 m 44 feet. In my opinion all that 
was necessary was to have the foundation 3 or 4 inches thicker than the walls, as shown 
on the plan. All beyond this was useless and superfluous in my opinion, for the founda- 
tion was rock. 

There are about 18 inches of hard pan found in all the east wing, but hardest at the 
west part of that wing. There was none, to my knowledge, any where else under the 
Parliament building. Although all the earth was not dug out under the building, I al- 
lowed in the measurement as if it had ; for it was moved from apartment to apartment so 
often, instead of being removed, that I thought the labour equal to the excavating of the 
whole. I look at the plan of cross sections of the excavation for ducts ; its own number 
XV ; it is letter Gr, of exhibited plans. I now speak of the air duct outside the building 
and in front of it ; it is excavated in earth and clay, in depths varying from nothing to 6 
feet above the rock, but the earth has been taken out to the rock, and walls built 2 feet 
thick for the sides of the ducts, and there are cross wails up to the bottom of the duct 6 
feet thick, about every 10 feet, to keep the walls out. This excavation was unnecessary ; 
the foundation of the duct would have been good in the clay ; it was solid enough in my 
opinion. The ducts on the west, and the three on the north are excavated from the rock 
I now speak of the one from the west. The general width is from 15 to 30 feet at top, 6 
to 17 feet at bottom, and the average depth from 8 feet to 17 feet and a half; its length 
396 feet. The rock was excavated unnecessarily wide in my opinion. The stone from 
the excavation was used in the work, and the additional width enabled the contractors to 
draw the rock out on a stone boat. There was, in my judgment, in the proportion of 16 to 
13 of the material unnecessarilly removed in this air duct, or three sixteenths of it might 
have been loft in. I speak of the duct from the north ; its width on top is from 16 feet 6 
iuches to 21 feet; at bottom from 15 feet 6 inches to 18 feet; depth from 9 feet 3 inches to 10 
feet 6 iuches ; length 80 feet, In my opinion, in this duct, the proportion of rock unne- 
cessarily removed was three sixteenths. I speak of the duct from the north-east. Its 
width at top is from 15 feet to 17 feet, at bottom from 11 to 14 feet, depth from 7 feet 5 
inches to 11 feet 9 inches, length 214 feet. In this, also, three sixteenths of the rock has 
been unnecessarily removed. I speak of the duct from the north-west ; it is in the same 
proportion as the others. In measuring the masonry for the duets, we measured the whole 
excavation, from the bottom to the top of the arch, and from this deducted the area of 
the duct openings. I speak of the east duct ; it was half clay half rock, and was taken out 
the neat width. It was not so deep as the others, and there was no superfluous work upon 
it. The masonry was rubble to the bottom of the ducts, then picked ashlar, which we 
measured on the face ; this was the mode of measurement in Ottawa and Kingston. I can- 
not speak of other places from my knowledge. This masonry was valued at 41 cents in 
the progress estimates. I do not know what was paid the workmen ; its actual value was 
about 25 cents a foot, as I believe, measured on the face. I put in a true copy of the mea- 
surements of Mr. Morris, of work done for progress estimates, from the commencement of 
the work till the end of May, 1860, and my own measurements of the work for June and 
July, 1860, (Exhibit No. 15). I copied it from the book which was lost, so far as Mr. 
Morris made the entries, and in that lost book, my own measurements were entered. I 
made up all the progress estimates from June, 1860, till Mr. Bowes came, on the 1st June, 
1861. The progress estimates were made correctly from my measurements so far as I 
know. I do not know how I measured the Nepean stone ; but, as it was substituted for 
Ottawa stone as an extra, I should only measure the actual face of the Nepean facing. Its 
depth is about a foot ; I do not know its value. I consider there is extra on the bond stone 

7 



50 



in the towers. I measured the walls as I found them, and not as they ought to have been, 
with reference to the contract. 

I was told to do so, as the estimates were but progress ones, and they could be cor- 
rected at the end of the year, but we have not had time to correct them, and I understood 
that Mr. Fuller corrected them at the time Mr. Page came. In Mr. Fuller's letter to me 
of the 1st June 1861, the errors he then spoke of, were the errors which had occured in 
the setting out of the walls. I understood him there were no other errors of any moment 
then. In the winter of 1860-61 we were making measurements for Mr. Page. Mr. 
Fuller first complained of errors, when the basement walls were to be set out. He did not 
complain before. He again complained of the ground floor walls. 

We sat them right as far as we could in the way I have stated. He did not complain 
that I remember of the extra thickness of the walls. I have marked on the plans in red 
figures, the thickness of the walls, as I now find them, and these walls are in excess of the 
proper contract wall in the proportion of about two to one. Mr. Morris instructed me as 
to the kind of work I was to get done. I had all my instructions from him till the 1st 
June 1861. None from the architects that I knowof. 

My instructions from Mr. Morris were to have proper bond in the Nepean stone, and 
rubble stoue, and to see that the rubble work was properly bedded, and the walls filled ; 
and I did so. Mr. Morris was taken frequently away from the work to do other things. 
There were not clerks of works sufficient to superintend the work at the beginning, it 
would have required the exclusive time of four on that building all the time. I was not 
much occupied in drawing plans, but I drew the plan XV, exhibit Gr, from which I have 
spoken. That plan fairly represents the work as it was, when it was made in the winter 
of 1860 61. 

I made no plans except what related to my measurements during the time I was here 
The sections on the plan Gr, show as accurately as possible the width of the excavation, 
beyond the face of the Parliament building. They show also the position of the rock 
excavated. The sections of the ducts on the south side of the building as laid down on 
the G. plan, represent the walls to be finished in height to the bottom of the flagging. The 
brick work on the east side of the boiler house, in the tramway is bad, and ought not to 
have been passed ; and I must have omitted to notice it, from its being covered with scaf- 
folding. I canuot say positively that it was by my orders that the extra thickness of 
window jambs was made in the basement. 

I estimated the price of the dressing of the stone for the ducts, at 25 cents per foot, 
from the fact that they were worked from the stone taken from the excavation, and were 
rough. x\fter I got my orders to superintend the east part of the work, I laid out the 
cross wall east and west; on the east side of the corridor; on the Legislative Council side 
of the building; aud the north and south wall on the east side of the corridor, also the 
north wall of the conidor, the walls round the Legislative Council room, and the walls 
north and south under the dining room ; the walls ruuning east and west on the west 
side of the corridor of the Legislative Assembly, and the walls south of the members' 
lobby, Legislative Assembly. 

These last two were done by me for Larose. The thickness of the walls I measured, 
I have marked in red from actual measurement. I have looked at the Nepean facing stone 
since yesterday, aud I was wrong in my statement then that they averaged twelve inches. 
They will not average more than eight inches deep on the bed of the wall. The toise oi 
masonry here, is, I think, 72 feet j in Toronto it is 54 feet. There is no hard-pan in any 
measurements I made on the Parliament building. In the progress estimates, it was 
illowed for the covering of the ducts, in front of the Parliament building, for limestone 
flagging, at the rate of 75 cents a superficial foot. 

The stone itself delivered was worth ninepence a foot. Mr. Fuller returned it in 
the progress estimate at 75 cents a foot. I consider it* real value about 30 cents, 
including stone and labour, 

(Signed) John &RJS? 



61 



23rd AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor, Bourgeau. 

Alexander Mackenzie, sworn. 

I am ft builder-; have been engaged in the business about 23 years. I have been en- 
gaged as superintendent, contractor, and architect on various buildings. I superintended 
the building of the locks of the St. Lawrence Canals and part of the fortifications at 
Kingston. I was contractor for, and built the county buildings for the counties of Essex 
and Lamb ton, the banking house ot the Bank of Upper Canada at Sarnia, the central 
school house there, besides churches and private buildings. I furnished the plans and 
specifications for the county buildings and school house I have spoken of. I never had 
any difficulty of any kind in any of my contracts. I did tender for all the public buildings 
at Ottawa, and the Governor's residence. I spent about a month, assisted by six others, 
in examining the plans, and making out estimates for these buildings. I had two plumb- 
ers, three carpenters and two masons with me. I made a careful estimate of quantities, 
and I tendered to build the Parliament building, and the Departmental buildings for the 
sum of $801,500. This included fire-proofing on the Parliamentary block. I was at Ot- 
tawa when I took the quantities. I found the plans and specifications to guide me. My 
impression is that these laid on the table of the architects. The conditions on which the 
tenders would be received, and also a printed copy of the form of contract usually entered 
into by the Department of Public Works. I found these forms of tenders and schedules 
to be attached. I think it was stated in that paper, and it was distinctly intimated, that 
no tender would be received which was not accompanied by a schedule of prices. I have 
a copy of the schedules distributed on that occasion, the heading of which does not corres- 
pond with the heading of the schedule published in the blue book, page 88. The words 
" and also for extras" are omitted after the words " dispensed with", in the sixth line as 
printed in that book. The use of that schedule as being incorporated with the contract, is 
expressed by itself. It is for the purpose of estimating progress estimates, and fixing the 
prices for alterations, additions, or works dispensed with, and for fixing the price of 
extra work. It was to prevent the possibility of dispute, in making progress estimates, 
and in the values of additional and extra w ;rks. The amount of work done additional or 
extra being ascertained, the price was fixed by the schedule at which such work would 
be paid. The practice of having schedules is not common in this Province, but it is the 
almost universal rule with the Imperial Government. I do not know the practice of the 
Department of Public Works. With ordinary buildings it is the usual practice to place 
the valuation of extra work in the discretion of the architects. I say the schedule I 
put in with my tender represented in detail the bulk sum of my tender, and also the 
prices I expected to be paid for extra and additional work. The universal opinion of all 
those I conversed with in reference to these schedules agreed with mine. In my view of 
it, a tender without a schedule ought not to have been received. I took some pains to 
be informed of the system under which the Parliament buildings in England were con- 
structed. The work was let in sections, eight in number. Three of these were let at 
bulk sums, but embodied in the contract were schedules on the same principle as in the 
case here. The rest were simple agreements that the work would be performed at the 
prices mentioned in the schedules attached to former contracts. I examined the sessional 
papers of the House of Commons on this subject, and I was unable to find, that in the 
course of inquiry, any instance had occurred of any deviation from the prices mentioned 
in the schedule. The estimate of Sir Charles Barry for certain works, was in round num- 
bers £707,000. The contract price was £682,104. I considered Mr. McGreevy's con- 



52 



tract too low. My own was as low as it it could possibly have been done for in my judg- 
ment. Mr. McGreevy's bulk tender for the three buildings was $579,000. This did not 
include fire-proofing for the Departmental Buildings. His separate tenders for each building 
put the fire-proofiug at $44,900 for the Parliamentary block, but he was allowed to add for 
fire-proofing to his bulk tender $48,310 for the departmental buildings. His tender 
thus supplemented was $627,310. Mine was $801,500, making the difference between 
his and mine $174,190. To mine should be added the fire-proofing of Departmental build- 
ings. I did not know until the Parliament met, of any irregularity in his tender by the 
omission of the schedule, nor did I know how it was made, but I have no doubt the prices 
mentioned in the schedule were in excess of what the bulk sum represented rather than 
under. I consider the mode of cubing buildings of this class not a correct mode. It may 
do very well for common buildings. 

The proper and reasonable precaution was to have got the architects or some compe- 
tent persons to make out quantities of the work, and to apply the ordinary values to these 
quantities and thus establish the value of the building. If this had been done, it would have 
appeared that the appropriation did not warrant this extent of building. I have examined the 
buildings as they now are with a good deal of care. The general exterior masonry of all the 
buildings is good — some very good — and the stone cutting is generally well executed. A 
small proportion of the stones are on the cant. A large proportion of the internal masonry 
in the Parliament building is of apoor class. The Departmental buildings are better. The 
brick work on the Parliament building is of a very inferior class, and the quality of the 
bricks entirely unfit for a building of the kind. One bad thing about the buildings is the 
irregularity with which the walls have been raised, entirely destroying the bond between 
the brick lining and the stone walls, and between the division and exterior walls. A 
large proportion of the brick must necessarily be taken down before the work is resumed, as 
they have crumbled away. The work is better in the lower than in the upper portions. 
The work seems ta have deteriorated as it advanced. The greater part of the bricks de- 
livered on the ground, so far as I have been able to examine them, are certainly unfit for the 
building. 

The brick work ia the Departmental buildings is of a better class both as regards 
material and labour, although there, little care seems to have been taken to reject soft or 
bad brick, I think there is very little wall in the Departmental buildings in excess of 
the contract walls. In the Parliament building there is a very large excess of masonry in 
the foundation walls. In these walls generally there is an excess of from a few inches up to 
lour feet. I saw a short wall six feet in excess, one of the walls I allude to is 100 feet long, 
and is about four feet in excess; I should infer that this arose from carelessness in laying out 
the work. In all the buildings, Parliamentary and Departmental, there is a remarkable 
excess of wall wherever chimney breaks occur in the walls. These walls are made the 
thickness of the chimney breasts all through ) this causes a great excess of masonry. 1 
think the buttresses of the Library ought to have been increased from what the plan 
shewed, but not to the extent they are. There is a very great waste in the foundations there. 

The practice in laying out a building is, for the architects to establish a ground level 
and give a centre or base line from which to work. The contractor from that assumes the 
responsibility of laying out the works. I think it is the duty of the architect and his 
clerk of works, who should in all cases be the nominee of the arcnitect, to see that the 
walls are in their proper place before the work is far advanced, and to be present to assist 
the contractor in giving all necessary information as the work proceeds. Whenever the 
contractor finds a difficulty, it is his duty to apply to the clerk of works or architect for 
information. 

The duty of the clerk of works and architect is to see that the work is in its proper 
place, and if it is not, the contractor should put it so at his own expense. There would 
be no objection to foundation walls being thicker than necessary, at the instance of the 
contractor. The result, however, would lead to dispute as to whether this leave was given, 
and to what extent. I think two clerks of works were necessary when the Parliament 
building was laid out. Their duty is not to set out the works, but to see that they are set 
out correctly. In ordinary buildings the contractor has a plan given him In large build- 
ings there is an office where the plans are kept open for the use of all who require reference 



58 



to them about the buildings. If the basement plans of these buildings lay in an office in 
this way, I think it was sufficient for a contractor. I think I should have had no difficulty 
in laying out the work from the plans of the basement and ground floor now shown me. 
The walls are figured, and the larger dimensions given, but the rooms should have bee,} 
figured also. There could, however, have been no difficulty in laying out the buildings 
from the plans, which are clear and well got up, 

The plan of Mr. Garth's heating and ventilating would add to the difficulty of laying 
out the foundations, but would not account for the errors I see. I now mention that there 
are many walls connected with the heating of unnecessary thickness. In the Departmen- 
tal buildings, I find walls along the corridors, connected with one of a brick in thickness 
- lying against them, where the same lining might better have formed part of the ordinary 
wall. I think the work for excavating and forming the air ducts external to the building 
could not properly have been let by contract to other parties while the other buildings 
were going on, but I can see no reason why they should not have been left. I think the 
carrying these ducts to the bank, was an injury instead of a benefit. I think the air could 
have been admitted close to the building. I have seen the work, and I have seen the 
plan showing the sections of that excavation. The quantity excavated seems excessive ; 
there seems to be two feet on each side too much. There is no difficulty in excavating 
limestone, and the rock in this hill is brittle, so that in blasting it, no very excessive 
quantities are likely to come out. An eighteen inch good common rubble wall, flush 
pointed with cement at the joints, would have been quite sufficient when the excavation 
was on rock. The cement would have prevented any dust from the disintegration of com- 
mon mortar. Instead of an eighteen inch wall, I find solid masonry, averaging about four 
feet, between the ducts and the rock, and instead of a rubble wall flush pointed as I have 
described, I find pick-faced masonry. 

I am acquainted with the value of pick-faced masonry such as I see on the ground ; 
its value is 17 cents per foot measured on the face. The rule of measurement here, and 
over all Canada, is on the face, not beds and joints. In measuring the rubble work, this 
cut stone is included, which pays for its setting in the work. The 17 cents I mention as 
the price does not include the material. I came to Ottawa before I tendered, for the ex- 
press purpose of examining the sites of the buildings, and the quarries in the neighbour- 
hood. I saw that there were several inequalities in various directions, while the architects 
had assumed the ground as level. 1 got an idea of the site pretty accurately from a block 
plan I found here, and I took the levels and found there would be a largo quantity 'of 
foundation work below the assumed level on the plans. Although the surface of the 
ground line could be taken very accurately, the depth of the rock could not be found 
without digging. I knew there would be a large quantity of masonry in the foundations ; 
and as such masonry pays best, it enabled me to lower the general price of my tender 
considerably. For this I expected to be paid by my schedules of prices. I knew there 
would be a large quantity of rock on the ground, which could be made available for rubble 
work. I think it was a great mistake to assume a level line for the foundations ; there 
should have been a profile made of the ground, and the depth of the rock ascertained by 
sinking test pits before exhibiting the plans, which should also have given a section of the 
strata of earth and rock, and so prevented any mistake. I think this error gave rise to a 
great part of the difficulty which has arisen, on aceount of the extraordinary interpre- 
tation given to the heading of the schedule. 

I say that before contract plans were drawn, it was the duty of some one to ascertain 
correctly the real foundations, and draw the plans accordingly, or to have had the contract 
so drawn, as to have covered the work necessary in constructing the building without 
dispute. I can only say, that if the Deputy Commissioner of Public Works, the architects 
and all, join in saying the schedule did not apply to that, I, and all that I knew who ten- 
dered tor the building, thought the schedule did. 



54 



25th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Chairman, 
Joseph Siieard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Alexander Mackenzie, — Examination continued. 

I find it stated that in the excavation for the foundations and sewers for the Par- 
liament building, according to Mr. Killaly's report, there are 1894 yards of hard-pan 
certified by the architects ; if this were so it would have made a good foundation for 
all the walls ; certainly for the interior walls. I find also from the same authority 
that in the foundations and the sewers of the western Departmental building 5570 
yards of hard-pan, and I find in the eastern Departmental building 2396 yards hard- 
pan certified by the architects, and I say that wherever there was hard-pan it would 
have made a good foundation, but I have been unable to find any trace of it. The 
solid masonry in the tower was unnecessary. The foundations need not have been over 
nine inches beyond the size of basement wall. Solid masonry it not usually so good as 
piers properly built of the proper size. I estimated the value of rubble stone, at $5 on 
the ground, and for whatever rubble work: the contractor was paid additional, the value of 
the stone he used should have been deducted, at the rate of $5 per toise. For all the 
purposes of the additional work, the contractor when paid for excavating the rock had no 
right to it. It was then quarried material, the property of the Government, and if he 
used it in his rubble or other work, for which he charged the Government full price, he 
ought to allow the Government the price of material. Looking at the rock from the ducts 
and the width of the excavation, I infer that the excessive width was for the purpose of 
getting the rock to enable the contractor more easily to get the material, [t was from the 
excavation made for these ducts, that the material for building the ducts came. I see 
other stone in the drains chiefly. There is a difference in the wording of the specification 
for the Departmental buildings from the Parliament building. 

In the specification for the Departmental buildings, quoins are not expressly men- 
tioned but implied. In the Parliament building quoins are expressly mentioned. I so 
read the specification when I tendered. I now show in my estimate for the work the 
entry, and I so read the specification now. As the quoins are, in the Parliament building, 
they are not according to the specification, nor of the size. In the Departmental buildings, 
according to my opinion of the specification, they are as specified. As I understood the 
specification about relieving arches, they were to be half of red sandstone, half of sand- 
stone from the neighbourhood. They are now of red sandstone, and so far, more expen- 
sive than the specification. I can speak of the different modes of measurement in Canada 
west. Rubble masonry is generally measured by the toise of 72 feet. By this mode all 
walls below 2 feet are assumed as 2 feet. Walls above 2 feet are cubed, calculated by the 
72 feet toise. Rubble masonry is frequently measured by the cubic yard. In estimating 
for these buildings, I cubed the work, and calculated by the toise of 54 feet. I did not 
calculate the walls below 2 feet as 2 foot walls, for the specification precluded that mode of 
calculation as I read it. Every where in Canada, dressed and cut stone is measured on 
the face only, no beds or joints. In fine moulding on cut stone, the face is measured, and 
the girth of the moulding added, but in large mouldings the girth is measured with the 
face. In estimating for these buildings, I girthed the whole, not deeming them of so 
complicated a character, as to require the applianca of face and girth as in fine work, 
excepting the lower arches in the tower. I cannot apply a rule to carved bosses, springers 
and fine carving. Arched work, such as the ducts and drains, are measured on the soffit 
and the amount doubled, ordinarily. In arches of windows and external arches the soffit 



55 



and external face are measured. The bulk of the masonry in these buildings is under the 
ground floor line. This masonry I estimated and tendered to do for $3.50 per toise ot 54 
feet. In this I estimated to furnish the stone, but if I were paid for excavatiug the stone, 
and used it from the excavations, then I should have done the work at $2 a toise of 54 
feet. The rstoiie from the excavation which was fit for rubble work, was worth on the 
ground, as taken from the excavation, $5 per toise. The enternal walls are $4.25 per toise. 
This was what I calculated my tender upon. To the depth the plans show the foundation 
line, the stone from the excavation belonged, as I road the specification, to the contractor ; 
under that line, I did not consider the stone from the excavation belonged to the contrac- 
tor. For all that I have s en, I could have done the work at these prices, for all the addi- 
tional work under the assumed line on the plans, indeed all the foundations and basement. 
The schedule is deficient in not having prices for the rubbl3 work, in the different stories 
of the building stated. I did not suppose there would have been any extra mason work 
above the assumed line shown on the plans. The pick-faced work I see on the sides of the 
drains and ducts can be got worked for 12 to 13 cents per foot. I would double this to 
the contractor for profit and the stone. A considerable portion of this work I call rather 
dressed rubble, than pick-faced masonry. The stone was got from rough material, mostly 
from the excavations. In allowing 25 to 26 cents a foot for the face for this work, I 
include the stone. The division walls for the drains and ducts are worth 30 per cent more 
thau I have stated for the sides. The skewback I should measure as part of the perpen- 
dicular wall. The pick-faced work on the boiler-houses, including material, is worth 35 
cents to the contractor. The pick-faced stone prepared for the ducts, I value at 25 or 26 
cents a foot on the face ; the laying it is allowed for by measuring it as rubble work as I 
have stated. The value of the limestone flagging covering the air ducts, is 30 cents a foot 
in the work ; this will allow a fair profit to the contractor. I had made arrangements to 
have Ohio stone delivered here, at 65 cents a cubic foot I do not know what it cost the 
contractors. For rough bouchard work on Ohio stone, I would give 15 cents a foot ; fine 
bouchard, 17 cents; rubbed do, 20 cents; sunk rubbed, 40 cents ; chamfered, 40 cents; 
moulded, 60 cents ; sunk circular, 55 cents ; circular moulded, 80 cents. The quoins in 
the Departmental buildings, as they now stand, I should say were worth 17 cents a foot. 
In the Parliament building the quoins are not bush-hammered at all. The difference as 
they are and specified is about 4 cents a foot. All these prices are as they should be 
allowed the contractor in extra or additional work, and allow him a fair profit, and as I 
estimated them myself. I think the Nepean worse to dress than the limestone. I think 
the Nepean facing is about 8 inches in bed in the wall, though in the lower part of the 
walls, the stones seem to have larger beds. The stones in the lower parts of the walls in 
all the buildings are better than the upper. Earth excavation is worth 25 cents a yard. 
Hard-pan 60 to 80 cents, generally 60, but I have seen none here. Rock excavation, such 
as I see here, is worth for the first 5 feet 60 cents, next 5 feet 80 cents, third 5 feet 
$1.10, the fourth 5 feet $1.50, the fifth $2.00, and for the sixth $2.50 per cubic yard. 
This" is the price I put upon the excavations as I find them. If they had been of the 
proper width they would have been worth from 20 to 25 per cent above those rates. 
When the regular price is allowed for the work, I never heard of centreing being allow- 
ed in such works as this. I estimated the loss in dressing Nepean stone in the ratio of 24 
to 16. It appears to have been drawn from the quarry and dressed, and should have been 
dressed at the quarry. If such brick as the specification requires, there would be 18 to 
the cubic foot. The openings in the brick work are not measured in interior walls. In 
measuring rubble work, the ordinary openings of doors and windows are not deducted. 
Anything over an ordinary door of 8 feet, the value of material should be deducted to, say, 
two-fifths of the opening. 

The difference in value between the Flemish bond, as specified [for in the Depart- 
mental buildings, and the bond as I find it in the 13 inch walls, is 20 cents a thousand 
bricks in favour of the contractors. In the Parliament buildings the kind of bond used 



56 



steps, the blue stone, is 20 per cent over the other kind. I think the style of architecture 
to be inferred from the notice calling for competition designs, is so general, with the 
exception of the term " entablature," applied only to the classic style, that na architect 
could form an opinion what style was required. It was a mere matter of opinion. I think 
there is no material difference in their adaptation to climate from the classic style, .or a 
modification of it, which I should have preferred to this style. I think the G-othic style is 
always wanting in light for offices, and these will be found deficient in this respect. I 
think Nepean stone is more durable than limestone. I am unable to give a matured 
opinion as to the system of heating and ventilating. I incline to the opinion, it is a good 
one, but its expense was entirely unwarranted in view of the appropriation for these build- 
ings. I have already stated my opinion to be, there was no need for carrying the ducts be- 
yond the walls, andnoue for facing them with dressed stone. I think a great deal of expense 
might have been saved by using the chimney flues and all the flues for the hot air system also. 
I forgot to mention before, that the style of these buildings is objectionable from the small 
projection of the cornice. The lower walls will be wet, and constantly injured by water 
and ice falling upon them. The mortar is already out on some parts of the Departmental 
buildings. I estimated the iron girders at $80 per ton. I had made an arrangement with 
an English house to furnish them at 17s 6d per cwt. here. Cement concrete, I value at $3 
per yard, common at $2.50, rough at $2. These prices will pay for the contractors a pro- 
lit. Any concrete I have seen done here is useless, having no bond. I have a poor opin- 
ion of gravel roofs, especially a deck roof over slate. They are totally unfit for the build- 
ings. The slating is pretty good. The cornice on the Parliament building has as much 
bedding on the wall as is specified; but it ought to be otherwise bonded, to strengthen the 
wall by having occasional through stones ; it seems to have drawn the wall, or has not been 
properly set. 

The deafening boards in the west wing are right, those in the others are common 
stuff. There was no difficulty in getting fire brick for the safe and record rooms as speci- 
fied ; they are built of rubble masonry with Nepean stone ; they are not arched as speci- 
fied but have iron joists ; the difference in the value will be very great. There would 
have been 80,000 fire bricks required in the eastern Departmental Building, and 65,000 in 
the western : they were worth, on the ground, $40 a thousand ; the Toronto brick would 
be worth $23 a thousand. Those used in lieu of Toronto brick are worth $ . The 
rubble work used instead of the brickwork is worth $2,200. The work, as specified, 
would have been worth $6,525, making a difference of $4,325 to the contractor on both 
Departmental Buildings. I think it the duty of architects to supervise all measure- 
ments, no matter who takes them, to see that they are correct, and hold themselves respon- 
sible for the perfect execution of the works according to the plans and specifications ; I 
think their duty, here and in England, is to measure the work ; I think the duty of the 
architect is to stand between the proprietor and the contractor, and to see that no injury is 
done ti either party. As I understand it, Sir Charles Bany engaged the measurers who 
measured the Parliament Buildings in England, and paid them, but I cannot speak 
positively. I refer to the duties of the architects here, as mentioned in the letter of the 
Department, 10th September, 1859, (Blue Book, pages 131 and 134.) I see the line point- 
ing out the part of the Parliament Building superintended by Mr. Morris. I think the 
walls arc more in accordance with the contract than in the other parts of the building ; a 
large number of his walls are right, and njt in excess, but some are wrong, both as to 
place and excess of wall. I do not know what the value of work was during the time the 
buildings were going on in Ottawa. 



57 



26th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 



JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Ytctor Bourgeau. 

Alexander Mackenzie, — Examination continued. 

I think it was imprudent to contract for the Parliament Buildings until the plans 
for heating* and ventilating had been matured and incorporated with the plans of the 
buildings; there seemed to have been undue haste in all the preliminary prepara- 
tions. I omitted to mention that the prices for masonry increase in the different 
stories of a building ; from the ground line to the first floor joists, rubble masonry would 
be worth $5.50, above this $7.00 per toise ; the value of brickwork all through the build- 
ings I estimated at $11.25 per thousand, measured in the walls. There was a good deal 
of difficulty in getting brick ; I estimated it higher on this account. The chases for pipes 
for water, gas, and bells, were to have been made in the walls by the contractor ; none 
have been made ; this will cause great expense hereafter in making these chases, and in 
making good the walls ; I should say $4,000, and over that sum. The cresting will orna- 
ment the buildings, but it will keep the snow on the flat portion of the roof, though not to 
an injurious extent. I did not like the gutters on the plan j the buildings look better with- 
out them, but the due protection of the walls below seems to require them. I do not- 
thick the buildings are so perfectly fire-proof as they would have been if arched with 
brick from one iron beam id the other. The corbelling over the walls is not proper work, 
each wall should stand fairly on the one below it ; I saw one built on the iron joists. The 
Ohio stone is the best that could be got anywhere, and is the best adapted for curved work, 
of any I know. The bosses at the corners will be destroyed by the water from the roof. 
T thiuk the buildings are properly placed in regard to the ground level of each. In this 
respect they are placed with due regard to economy, but if the western building had been 
two feet higher from the ground it would have been better and saved rock excavation : I 
think the saving in expense would have been considerable by adopting the higher level. 

I think the ice and snow from the roof of the two chambers will break the skylights* 
in the roof above the corridors aud wardrobes. The circular staircases will be rather dark, 
and so will the corridors in front of the Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly 
chambers ; I think these chambers will be sufficiently lighted. The members will have 
no opportunity of looking out at the windows. They will have the pure light from above 
through the skylight. 



(Signed,) 



Alexander Mackenzie. 



Thomas Stent, furthei examined : 

The first time I heard of its being extra was before Mr. Page, I think. We did not 
at that time allow it as extra, nor until Mr. Killaly allowed it, although it was fre- 
quently urged as extra, after Mr. Page's visit. I am positive that Mr. Keefer, in direct- 
ing us to make the schedule to be attached to Mr. McGreevy's contract, after his tender 
had been received, told us the schedule was to apply to progress estimates only, and 
not to extra or additional work. We used the printed heading unintentionally, which 
made it apply to all works as in the other tenders. 

8 



58 



From the first, we understood that the extra and additional work was not to be paid 
for by that schedule, and we never applied it to such work, but to progress estimates only. 
There is hardpan in the south front of the eastern Departmental building. In the western 
Departmental building there is no hard-pan in the strict sense, but clay and boulder exca- 
vation, as difficult to excavate as hard-pan, and so classed. Frozen ground was estimated as 
hard-pan ; ir, would have been better to have stated the fact as it was, but in point of ex- 
pense it was about the same. I was always of opinion that the appointment of the clerk of 
works independent of the architect made them all feel that they were not bound to obey 
their orders, but exercise their own judgments. 

This was vexatious always. Besides the instance I have spoken of, we sent through 
Mr. Morris to the contractors, two letters, which on reading he returned, saying they did 
not agree with his views. Upon this we referred the matter to Mr. Page, who agreed with 
us, that the letters should be sent as they were, and they were so sent. The clerks of works 
were competent, but their tenure of office was inconsistent with proper subordination. In 
the spring of 1861, the excavation for the sewer of the eastern Departmental building h^d 
become, in fact, filled with ice and debris from the rock on the sides. The contractors 
wished to be allowed to remove it, to go on with the rock excavation earlier, as an extra, 
which we refused, because in a week or two the ice would thaw. We heard no more of 
it till the end of the month, wheniu a day bill for extra work, several hundred dollars was 
sent in for this very work, and on enquiry we were told that Mr. Morris, in contravention 
of our direction, had instructed Mr. Hutchison, the under clerk of the works, to have it 
done, and actually wrote the order iu Hutchison's book. We refused to allow the work. 
As regards the quoins in the Departmental Buildings, we hud n ) doubt but that they 
were not extra ; but a doubt was raised from the fact, that they are expressly spoken of in 
the mason work, which was to have been lime stone, but only impliedly specified as among 
the dressings of the building. 

If they were to have been limestone, they are Ohio stone, and so far as the stone is 
concerned, were contended for as extra, and Mr. Killaly allowed it as such. 

(Signed,) Thomas Stent. 



Thomas Stewart, sworn : 

I am a Builder, have been engaged in the business in Canada for 19 years ; 17 years 
in Kingston, 2 in Ottawa. I built the masonry of the new gaol, and a school house, or 
chapel of the church of England, in Sussex Street. I am acquainted with the price of 
work in Ottawa and Kingston, and of the modes of measurement in both places. In mea- 
suring ashlar in both cities, the face is measured only. The term ashlar applies to all cut 
stone. In rubble work the standard thickness of wall is two feet, the excess beyond two 
feet is cubed, and the toise in ail these cases is 72 cubic feet. If rubble is faced with ashlar, 
the ashlar is measured with the rubble, as a general rule, but sometimes it is 
not so measured. Ohio stone is measured just in the same way as limestone. I know no 
difference in the mode of measurement between t v, em. The price of Ohio stone varies 
with the difference ol freight from 55 to 65 cents per cubic foot, laid down in Ottawa, I 
bought a few hundred feet from Mr. McGreevy, and paid him for it at 75 cents a foot. I 
think the rule in measuriug eut stone is to girth the mouldings, and if fine and intricate, 
add to the price, but in no case measure bed or joint. I never heard of this mode of mea- 
surement. 1 have seen the pick-faced woik iu the ducts and drains. I have paid for 
suoh work, but broader bedded, 12h to 20 cents per foot for the workmanship. This is 
not wide bedded, and can be got done for about 12| cents per foot for the workmanship, 
which, with labour and profit, I put at 18 cents, to which add value of material 15 cents, 
if Gloucester stone, making in all 33 cents. The other 12 cents making in all 30 cents per 
foot. Seventy-five per cent of the material in the Parliament building is of the rock from 
the excavation, and 25 per cent of it Gloucester stone, and stone of as good quality for the 



59 



purpose. Fifty per eeut of the Departmental buildings from Gloucester, and fifty per 
cent from the excavation. In the boiler houses, the labour and profit on the stone, are 
worth 27 certs, the material included, 37 cents a foot. The inverted arch work in the 
drains, I value at 27 cents, the relieving arches 35 cents, including material. The skew- 
backs should be measured as wall, and in the narrowed work, the price of the skewbiicks 
should be 27 cents per foot on the face. All this work is measured on the face only. I 
value the Nepean stone on the ground here, at 17 cenls a cubic foot; in the wall, on a 9 or 
10 inch bed, 27 cents. In the winter a team will drag 40 feet ou an average per day. 
Plenty of teams can be got at 12s. (id. per day, to which I would add for profit 20 per 
cent. The stone at the quarry is worth per toise of 216 fee/, $12. 00. I thinka toise of 
stone would face 21G feet of the wall. Ottawa stone in the wall as originally specified 
would not be worth more than 121 cents, the difference 14<> cents. The toise of 54 feet 
of rubble masonry in the foundations, is worth S3. 78. In the first floor $4.58, second floor 
$5.13, upper floor $5.43, and in the upper part of the towers after the fourth story, add 
$1.00 per toise for every additional ten feet. Karth excavation is worth for the first 5 feet 
20 cents, second 5 feet 25 cents, thiid 5 feet 35 cents, fourth 5 feet 50 cents, per cubic 
yard. Boek excavation for the first 5 feet, is 80 cents, second 5 feet $1.00, third 5 feet 
$1.50, fourth 5 feet 82.00, fifth 5 feet $3.00 sixth 5 feet $4.20, per cubic yard. This in- 
cludes the removal of it. Such of it as was fit for ducts and drains is worth 10 cents a foot for 
rubble masonry, $3.75 per toise of 21G feet, but in such a place there would be a waste of 
from 35 to 40 per cent. The difference in price between Ohio and limestone for quoins 
would be 60 cents, or 45 cents per cubic foot. The price for labour for cutting and rub- 
bingOhio stone per foot, measured on the face, only 15 cents, sunk faced 21£ cents, plain 
faced circular 28 cents, j-unk faced 44 cents To this I would add to the contractor 20 
percent for profit. The price of labour on the Arn prior marble, is three times the 
prices of the above, for the same classes of work. The material itself is worth 60 to 65 
cmts per foot. If brought in summer it would cost SI. 10 per foot. During the progress 
of these buildings, the wages of bricklayers were from $1.30 to $1.75 per day. (rood 
labourers from 75 to 90 cents. Quarry-men 80 cents to $1.10. Masons from $1.30 to 
$1.60. Good setters $1.80. Stone cutters $1.50 to $1.75. Carpenters and Joiners $1.00 
to $1.75 per day. Teams $2.25 on the average, but for a considerable number $2.50 per 
day for such as were used on this work. For taking back earth for fitting and running 
30 cents per yard. I tendered for the buildings, but at much lower rates than some of 
these. I inteuded to do all the extra work at the rates of my schedule, but they were 
higher than the bulk sum of my tender warranted. The straight moulded work as it is 
in the buildings, is worth 70 cents a foot. Circular moulded $1.10. The straight stone 
work on the entrance to the main tower in the Parliament building is 95 cents. The cir- 

o 

cular moulded work, $1.25. In the Departmental buildings I estimate the work the same. 
The cutting is admirably Avell done on all the buildings, and would be creditable anywhere. 
The chamfered work on the window and door dressings, I should count as moulded work, 
circular work ou the windows the same. This is a good full price, and includes a profit of 
20 per cent to the contractor. Chiselled stone work is worth 3 cents a foot less than rub- 
bed work, luue drove chiselled work is worth the same as rubbed work. 

The cut stone ou the top of the plinth of the Parliament Building is worth 27 cents 
a foot includiug profit. The work on square quoins 17 cents; splayed quoins 20 cents; 
jambs measured ou the reveal and face; sunken and chamfered work taken on the same 
girth 25 cents, which include - profit. The base in the Departmental Buildings is Brock- 
ville stone, 33 cents a foot ; the work is of a very good description. Quoins above ba.«e, 
square Ohio stone 18 cents. The splay is taken into account in the prices I have given. 
Splayed quoins above base 30 cents ; jambs of basement doors and window-, Brockville 
stone, 33 cent. 

When the stone is Ohio, the price should be 8 cents a foot less. All these prices 
include a profit of 20 per cent to the Contractor. In measuring brickwork, the openings 
are deducted, but I considered it unfair, and think that half ought to be allowed, unless 
the opening exceeds 10 feet, aud then the whole should be deducted. This is a fair com- 
pensation for wast® and materials. The general rule is to exclude openings, J value the 



60 



brickwork in the Parliament Building as it is, at $11.00 a thousand j in the De partmenta 
Buildings $13.00. I have added a dollar for better material, and one for better workman- 
ship in the Departmental Buildings. 

On the west side of the east tower of the Parliament Building I find there is a 
stratum of clay and gravel of about 6 inches deep, next to the rock, above which is sand. 
This stratum is not hard pan, but 15 cents a yard extra should be allowed for it. I think 
the slates on the ground are equal to the specification. 

In my valuing Nepean stone in the face of the wall at 27 cents, I include 2 cents foi 
pointing. 

(Signed,) James Stewart. 



27th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT I 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman. 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourueatt. 

Charles Garth, sworn, 

I am the contractor for heating and ventilating the buildings. On the 12th Novem- 
ber, 1859, I asked Mr. Keefer if the heating and ventilating was to be included in the 
building contract ; he said no, it was to be separate and would soon be advertised. On the 
14th November I saw the advertisement, and sent my agent to copy the plans of the build- 
ings, then lying in the office of the Department of Public Works for intending contrac- 
tors. After getting such copies as were necessary for my information, I proceeded to 
make plans and specifications for heating and ventilating, to accompany my intended ten- 
der for the work. 

On the 23rd December, by arrangement, I met Mr. Keefer at Brockville, with my 
plans so far as they were then advanced, to get from him such information as I then 
required. It was, first, whether the engine room could be lowered ten feet below the 
basement floors ; he informed me it could, and the excavation was to bo done by the 
Department. Second, whether the walls could be altered in the basement, and warm air 
vaults made ; he answered they could, so far as it did not interfere with the rooms. 
Third, whether warm air and ventilating flues could be made in the walls, and the neces- 
sary recesses for coils and registers ', he said l he contractors were to do this. Fourth, 
Whether I could have some of the rooms in the basement ; he said no. Fifth, whether 
the basement rooms were to be heated ; he answered yes. Sixth, whether the arrange- 
ment for ventilation which the architects had made could be changed without injuring 
the work and causing trouble with the contractors for the buildings ; he said they could, 
as detailed drawings were to be furnished. Seventh, how many ventilation flues there 
were, and whether they could be altered, if required, to suit the ideas of the contractor for 
heating and ventilating ; he answered they could. Eighth, whether in the parts of the 
basement marked " No basement'' there could be vaults got, and at whose expense; he 
said there could, at the expense of the Department. And lastly, whether the architects 
had not arranged the buildings to be warmed in some particular way ; he said no, I was 
not to mind what I saw on the plan, but to carry out my own idea so as not to interfere 
with the buildings too much ; he said the contractor who interfered the lea.«t with the 
building would have the chance of preference, 



61 



He said lie would send me the specifications of the buildings, and some tracings which 
my agent had not got, and I received them about the olst, with a letter from the Depart- 
ment of the 80th December, 1359. (Exhibit No. 16.)' I had no further communication 
from the Department till I handed in my tender of the lGth January, 18G0. During the 
week following I was called in on two or three occasions before Mr. Keefer and Mr. Fuller to 
give explanations, which I gave. I heard no more of it till I saw a notice in a Quebec 
paper that the contract had been awarded to me. I saw Mr. Keefer and asked if I was to 
have the contract ; he took me to Mr. Hose, the Commissioner, who verbally informed me 
1 should have it, on condition that I should visit Washington to see the work there, as such 
was the wish of the Governor General, which I proceeded to do as soon as I could leave. 

Immediately after, I had an interview with Mr. Keefer, in his office, and he told me I 
must go at once to Ottawa with my plans, which he then returned me, to mature them with 
the architects, and the official notice would be sent to me there. Soon after my arrival 
in Ottawa I received from the Department the letter of the 28th January, 1860. 
(Exhibit, No. 17.) I was engaged from the 1st to the 10th February in adapting and 
arranging the plans with the architects and Mr. Morris, the superintendent, so that the 
work could be proceeded with. I took the plans to Montreal with me, and as soon as I 
could get the altered tracings ready, and during the remaining part of February and the 
month of March, I sent them to Ottawa that the work might proceed. On the 6th April, 
1860, I got a telegram from Mr. Keefer, saying he would " meet me at Ottawa on Tuesday 
next," and asking me " to go up on Monday, if I could/' I went there on the day appoint- 
ed and remained till the 12th. I met Mr. Keefer, ail the architects, and Mr. Morris. The 
plans were discussed and adopted with some slight alterations. 

The plans were adopted, and nothing left to prevent the works going on, of which I 
was aware. I requested that as the responsibility of the system of heating and ventilating 
was on me, I should have in some way the superintendence of the building of the venti- 
lating ducts and flues. I said it would take a man his whole time to sec that the ducts 
and flues were built according to my plan, and I proposed to appoint a person in whom I 
had confidence, and whom the Government should pay, but who should be under the 
architects, to superintend the work. They all agreed such a person was necessary, but 
the appointment should not proceed from me. I stated, if they would appoint a person 
I approved, I should be satisfied, and it was agreed to. 

This appointment was never made, and its consequence may be that the Department 
w r ill suffer expense and inconvenience, before the work is done. It was at this time, I 
think, the question of the material of which the ducts were to be made came up. My 
plans showed brick neatly pointed ; it was stated that good brick could not be got, and the 
architects preferred stone. I said I had no objection if the surface was smooth, as pointed 
brick would have made it, but there was a long discussion upon it. It was stated then 
that there would be walls over the ducts in the Library, and brick would not be safe, I 
think. It was then understood that, for the time being, the clerks of works should 
superintend the building of the ducts and flues, but I understood the superintendent I 
had required would be appointed within a few days. 

It was then agreed that, as soon as the slight alterations then agreed upon were made 
in the plans, complete tracings of them should be sent to Quebec and Ottawa, which was 
done by me on the 30th April. In the beginning of May I left for Washington, and 
during the month of May examined all the public buildings furnished with the heating and 
ventilating system, in New York, Philadelphia and Washington. In New York I met 
Mr. Nason of the firm of Nason, Dodge and Co., who arc engaged in this business, and 
have much experience, and who constructed the heating and ventilating system in the 
capitol, patent office, and President's house, in Washington. To him. I submitted my 
plans, and he approved of them. I met at Washington Mr. Walters, the official architect 
of the Government, an amateur in the heating and ventilating system, of much experience. 
To him I submitted my plans, aud he approved of them. I did the same to Mr. Morse, 
connected with some of the heating and ventilating systems in public buildings in New 
York, and he approved of them. I inspected with great care the systems in use in the 
public buildings iu Washington, where the fan is used instead of the external ducts, and 



62 



having considered all, I returned, satisfied that my plan was as perfect as all the experience 
hitherto obtained could make it. 

The objection to the fan system is the draughts it causes. On its first introduction into 
the Legislature Chambers in the capital, it was introduced under the risers of ihe steps, 
but the draughts were annoying to the members. Next, a register was placed near every 
member's seat, and at his own control, but this was objected to for the same reason. 
Lastly it was introduced by hopper openings in the walls, but this did not satisfy 
those in the galleries. But by dispensing with the fan, and having the long ducts, I 
expect the air to come in so gradually as not to be disagreeable, for I have provided for 
the exit of the air, which was not properly provided for in the places I have mentioned, 
but rather forced in and blown about without proper means of escape. At Washington 1 
learned that forcing the cold air against (he coils in frosty weather was apt to freeze them, 
and I found the same difficulty myself in the Parliament Buildings at Quebec, but by 
bringing the air through long under ground ducts, I anticipate its being so moderated in 
temperature as not to freeze the coils'. 

The new wing of the Montreal gaol is heated on my system without fans, and there 
the greatest care is required to prevent the coils from freezing in very cold weather ; for 
the lower coil is nearest, and is less lieated than the upper one. In that building the air 
from the outside goes through the building about 24 feet before it comes in contact with 
the coil. To prevent this freezing, by modifying the temperature of the air in its pas- 
sage through the long ducts, I suggested that the duets should be long, as they are found. 
It was a matter of discussion between Mr. Kcefer, the architects, Mr. Morris, and myself, 
whether the long ducts, or merely shafts near the buildings, were the best. I was aware 
of the order to coustruct three in rear of the Library, but I was not aware of the order for 
the rest, although in my visits I saw them in course of construction. Arrangements have 
been made for the introduction of fans for the Legislature Chambers, if they are found 
necessary ; but, if necessary, they are to be put in at the expense of the Government. I am 
responsible for the system working well, provided it is carried out in its completeness on 
my plan, and I have no doubt of it. 

I did not suggest cut stone masonry for the ducts, nor require it. Another reason 
for the long ducts is an anticipated saving of fuel, by the air being modified in its tem- 
perature, but the principal reason for lowering the boiler house, is that the return water 
would be carried back to the boilers at a higher temperature, and thus saving pumps, as has 
hitherto been the practice, and saving fuel, through the water being warmed in its return 
through the pipes into the boilers. Another reason for lowering the boilers is, that if 
built on the ground in the court, it would have taken light from the rooms, and it was 
objectionable to have the boiler under the building. The reason for there being so many 
ducts in the building is, to prevent the inconvenience that arises from the wind blowing 
in different directions, for by a system of slides the engineer iu charge can stop or open 
as many as are required in any direction about the building. 

I think, on my first visit to Ottawa after my return from Washington in the begining 
of June, 1860, in looking over the buildings to sec their progress, I observed fine cut 
ashlar work in the cold air duct leading through the space under the Library. 
I drew the attention of Mr. Morris to it and said it was more expensive work than 
the thing required, and that I thought there might be difficulty with the Department on 
account of the expense. He auswered the work was to be first class. I then asked if esti- 
mates of the extras were sent in monthly. He said estimates were sent in monthly show- 
ing the extra over the contract work. On receiving this answer, supposing he was the 
superintendent for the Government, as he appeared to be, I took no furtlrer notice of it. 
I said it was my opinion, the sum appropriated would not cover the contract and extras 
then going on. He thought differently- I spoke to Mr. Fuller, and he agreed it was not 
necessary, and if I did not object it should be discontinued, and it was discontinued from 
the fine to the pick faced, and I meddled no more with the work in any way, until I re- 
ceived a letter from Mr. Page dated the 7th February, 1861. (See Blue Book pages 236 
and 246.) All this time my contract remained unsigned, and I had been delivering material 
and proceeding with my contract. About the ] 7th October, I received a letter from the De- 



(53 



partment dated 16th October, 1800, No. 34,124, desiring me to meet the architects in 
Ottawa, to arrange a meeting at the office of the Department at an early date to agree upon 
and draw up a specification for the contract for heating and ventilating the building in 
accordance with the plans agreed upon and the tenders and conditions approved by Or- 
der in Council, and informing me that this specification was necessary to enable the De- 
partment to have the contract executed, and that no money could be paid to me for work 
until my contract was signed, There was an arrangement made, and I and the architects 
went to Quebec but missed saeing Mr. Keefer, and he arranged a meeting to take place 
at Ottawa, and we all met there. From the 5th to the 8th November, 1860, the specifi- 
cation was discussed between Mr. Keefer, the architects, and myself, and sometimes Mr. 
Morris, and finally approved of and signed by the architects. 

It is published in the blue book, from pages 182 to 194. I did not insist at that 
meeting that pick-faced masonry should be used ; my specification says "smooth inside the 
ducts and flues." I was not competent to judge of the style of work ; I left it to them. 
The specifications, as approved were taken to Quebec, and 1 received a letter dated the 3rd 
January 1861, from the department enclosing a draft of my contract which I took to Que- 
bec, and it was modified, engrossed, and signed on the 12th January 1861. (See blue 
book, pages 167 to 195.) 

I was in Ottawa from the 18th to the 26th January, giving Mr. Page any informa- 
tion he required respecting the heating apparatus. Afterwards the correspondence took 
place between us respecting the ducts. (See blue book, pages 240 and 241.) I assented 
to rubble masonry in the ducts by their being larger, and having cement on the joints. I 
never was in any way consulted by any officer of the Department as to the expense of my 
system of heating and ventilating. I had a letter from the Department dated 27th Aug- 
ust 1861, ordering extra work to about 35,300. a part of which I prepared. But I had 
another letter of the Department dated 28th September telling me my works were sus- 
pended, and I forbore to go on. After the work was suspended, I waited for three days 
to see Mr. Killaly, but he sent me word he did not require me then, and if he did he 
would send for me. I left word by my agent to. see him, and learn if I was required, but I 
was not. 



28th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT t 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0. Chairman. 
Joseph Sheard, Vtctor Bourgeaii. 

Charles Garth, further examined : 

I wished to see Mr. Killaly particularly as to the protection of my works, but I could 
not see him; they were left just as they were, so far as I knew. I object to the state- 
ment of Mr. Killaly in answer to this question, No. 18, in his examination before the 
Legislative Council, and in his answer to the question No. 45. He says, in this latter 
answer, which is a stronger reiteration of the first, " the defect in the supervision was, 
that Garth, to fulfil his contract, assumed control over the work, and much interference 
with the works arose in consequence." To this, I say, that I never assumed any control 
whatever ; all I did was, in consultation with the architects, Mr. Keefer. and Morris, to 
have my plans adapted to the buildings; but from the time they were settled, I never 
caused a single deviation or assumed any control whatever. 



64 



In February and April, 1860, my plans for the ducts were considered aud settled 
upon. I never offered any suggestion except when T was referred to by the architects. 
My contract was not signed till the 12th January, 1861. I drew my original plans with 
reference to the requirements of the buildings as well as I could. My flues went through 
no place which appeared to ine improper ; but the reason of my meeting Mr. Kecfer, the 
architects, and Mr. Morris, was to adapt them to the building, which was done, and I had 
nothing further to do with it, except in consultation with them. 

(Signed,) Charles Garth. 



John Morris, further examined : 

The measurements I took from the commencement of the work, till they were taken 
by Grist, I think were correct. I did direct Mr. Grist to measure the stone from the 
excavation as rubble stone delivered on the ground, and I did so measure and return it 
myself in the monthly progress estimates ; I do not know whether the architects knew it, 
but this was returned in the monthly estimates ; and the book of quantities, if they asked 
for it, was before them wdien the progress estimates were made. 

I put a mark on the Library wall which is there yet. All under that line, which is 
five feet below the ground line shown on the plan of the Parliament building, is extra. 
The contractor was bound to excavate two feet over the whole surface of the building 
whether rock or not All below that was extra ; but we measured all the excavation, and 
returned it. This is what we intended to put right in winter, but did not. What we in- 
tended to do, if we had had the opportunity, was to ascertain the whole excavation, and from 
it deduct the first two feet, which the contract bound the contractor to do, and return 
the rest as extra. 

This ought yet to be done. The matter was taken from our hands by Mr. Page and 
the architects, so we never did it. I cannot account for the extra thickness of the walls, 
except that I think it was advantageous to Mr. McGreevy to use heavy stuff, although in 
the towers there was room enough to use it without thickening the walls. All the air duct* 
for the Parliament building were excavated the first summer, excepting the ducts from 
the Legislative Chambers, and the portion of the duct running east from the building. 
The excavation for the eastern Departmental building, and two thirds of the excavation of 
the ducts, external to the building, were done the first year. On the western Departmental 
building, all the excavation was done on the front towards Wellington street, and the ex- 
ternal drain was about two thirds done the first year. As many men worked in all the 
excavation as could work. The main object in pushing the excavation was to drain the 
building, and it was important to have the blasting done before the walls were built, but it 
furnished rubble stone to the contractor on the spot for the use of the build- 
ing. I found there was delivered from other quarries in January 1860, 204 
quarry toises of rubble stone, but in this month there was no rock excavation. 
The next month there was delivered 443 quarry toises, but the rest of the rubble 
stone came from the excavation. I returned no hard-pan. I never saw any on the 
Barrack hill ; but there was found under the cast wing of the Parliament building, and in 
the greater part of the front of the eastern Departmental building, clay and gravel. There 
was, I should say from memory, 533 yards in the Parliament building, and I returned it as 
clay, but it was worth 10 cents a yard more than ordinary clay. In the eastern Depart- 
mental building I cannot give the quantity, but Mr. Hutchison can tell. There was none 
in the western block, but there were large boulders which could not be removed without 
blasting. 

T instructed Mr. Grist, the first month he came, to measure the walls as he found 
them, but afterwards told him not to measure their increased thickness ; but he did 
measure them, and they w r ere returned contrary to my instructions. The rubble stone 
from the excavation was estimated at 87 cents per toise of 54 feet, or at the rate of $3.48 



65 



per quarry toise. I recollect no important delay in detailed drawings for the Parliament 
building, but there was delay in the Departmental buildings, and the men were kept 
waiting. The letter book will show the correspondence, and the architects book when 
they were delivered. The instance referred to by Mr. Stent of disobeying his orders, with 
reference to the delivery of two letters to the contractors, occurred in this way : — 
Mr. Hutchison had gone to the architects for some information, which they communi- 
cated in open letters addressed to the contractors, which Hutchison brought to me to be 
copied, but saying he could not understand the directions contained in them, and asked 
me to explain them. I could not understand them, and I suggested that the best way 
would be to take them back to the architects, to make them explicit. We did so, and they 
were offended j but I suggested the taking them back in a friendly spirit, for I could not 
understand their meaning, nor could Hutchison. The other instance, about the removal of 
the frozen ice and debris in the ducts, in the spring of 1861, occurred in this way : — It 
was important that a beginning should be made in the spring. 



29th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

John Morris, further examined : 

Mr. Fuller had issued an order directing the removal of it, to a limited extent, 
in the Parliament building. The contractor and his foreman had been in the 
habit of consulting rae as to what was best to be done, aud I had freely 
given my opinion, always with the understanding that the architects should first 
approve of it. In this instance I agreed with them that a beginning should be 
made in both buildings, but I objected to their beginning at the extremities, but was 
willing they should begin in a limited space near the boiler houses. They commenced 
without first getting the sanction of the architects, and went farther than I approved, for 
the purpose of using a derrick beyond the curve, but I never heard of it till the monthly 
estimates were made. I did not intend to do anything, and in fact did nothing, in oppo- 
sition to the architects, or as acting on my own responsibility on the occasion. The con- 
tractors did work which was charged in the time-bill, of which I never heard, at another 
part of the works. The extent of the work I thought onght to be done, would occupy six 
men three or four days on each block. The contract prices did not pay the contractors, 
but the prices fixed by the architects were supposed to do so, but no estimate was final in 
this respect. The plans were in a room open to all concerned in the buildings. I never 
heard Mr. McGreevy complain that the plans did not sufficiently show what the work was 
to be, but I heard him say he thought the architects ought to have furnished him with a 
set of plans. I had no time to attend to the estimates after Mr. Grist came. The assist- 
ant clerks of works, after their appointment, measured their own portion of the work, and 
from their measurements the monthly estimate was made. I was aware the architects had 
never made any measurements for the monthly estimates. They did not at first, but sub- 
sequently told me, it was no part of their duty. 

The measurements of the first year for progress estimates and for extra work were not 
accurate, but approximate, except as to the depth of the excavation and foundation, and 
they were not intended to bind either the Government or contractors, but were subject to 
a re-measurement. 
9 



66 



In the measurements I and my assistants took for the monthly estimates, I certified 
only to their approximate correctness. The estimate made in February, 1861, was made 
between Mr. Page and the architects. . I signed it pro forma only. I knew nothing about 
it, but my signature was required to give it effect, and I had no doubt of its correctness, 
as it was made under the supervision of a superintendent of the Department. I knew 
there were deductions made, which I believe were on account of the excess in the thick- 
ness of the wall. Referring to the map H, which contains the levels of the ground refer- 
red to the lock sill, on the second row of figures from the south side is the elevation 
marked L38.3. The ground line of the eastern Departmental building is 3 feet 8 inches 
above this level, and 6 feet 8 inches above the ground as it originally stood, at the- south 
west angle of the building. The boiler houses were excavated 10 feet lower than the 
lowest floor on the north side of the building. The original sewers were to drain the 
basement, but when the boiler houses were lowered, the sewers had to be lowered ten feet. 
This increased in great proportion the size and expense of the rock excavation and masonry; 
for, at the given depth, to drain the basement, the bottom of the sewer was of a certain 
width ; but in order to make it ten feet deeper, it had to be so much wider on the top and 
all the way down thus : 



and the lower excavations were done at a rate increasing every five feet. The masonry 
was in the same proportion. As I laid out the excavation for the ducts, they were of 
such a width as would admit only of the masonry and the ducts. I find they are much 
wider now, and I cannot account for the difference. The hot air flues in the original 
plans were adapted to Mr. Garth's plan, — some smaller, some larger. His plan was 
adopted, and the work on the original ones was intended to be deducted from the work on 
he actual ones, and the difference extra. 

I saw the schedule which Mr. McGreevy sent in, which he refers to in his letter to 
the Commissioner of Public Works. It was the printed form filled up, but Mr. Stent, Mr. 
Fuller and myself saw that the prices in the schedule did not correspond with the bulk 
sum of his contract, and that if the estimate had been made out and paid upon it, the 
whole of his contract money would have been drawn before the work could have been half 
finished. This we pointed out to Mr. Keefer, who then directed us to make such a 
schedule as would apply to his contract. Mr. Fuller was present when we began, but 
he left Mr. Stent and I to make it out ; and we made it iu the way I have already 
stated ; and we made a schedule *the same day for the Departmental buildings, and 
on the same direction and in the same way. I have no doubt the schedules we 
made fairly represented the bulk sum of the contract for the Parliament building and 
probably over. We had not the quantities of it, but Mr. Stent had the quantities of the 
eastern Departmental building ; and the schedule we made for the Departmental buildings, 
applied to these quantities, came near the bulk sum of the contract for that. 

I now look at the original contract between the Commissioner of Public Works and 
Mr. McGreevy. I know Mr. McGreevy's signature ; it is his name and signature I 
see before the seal on the contract. It is his name and signature I now see to the specifi- 
cation aud schedule attached to the contract — his name and signature is at the top and end 
of the schedule of prices, It is the printed form as exhibited to intending tenderers, and 
is the schedule prepared by Mr. Stent and myself. The figures are mine under it, and it 
is the one Mr. Keefer directed to be made in the way I have spoken. As the specifica- 
tions were exhibited to intending contractors, there were conditions attached to them, 
lithographed as the specification was, and forming part of it. These are not attached to 
the specification I now see attached to the contract, but I put in lithographed copies of 
these conditions; they are contained in exhibit No. 2, of which I formerly spoke, I have 
put my name before and after what I speak of as the condition to the specification as 



67 



exhibited to contractors, and not now found in the specification attached to the original 
contract. 

I now see the original schedule which Mr. McGreevy put in, spoken of before by me, 
referred to in his letter of the 29th November, 1859. A true copy of it is put in, marked 
exhibit No. 18. My figures in pencil appear on the margin, as indicating what I consid- 
ered the value of the different classes of work, as corresponding with his contract. I now 
see the original schedule put in by Mr. McGreevy for the Departmental buildings. This is 
the one I spoke of, and to which he refers in his letter of the 29th November, 1859. 
The pencil figures are not mine nor do I know whose they are j it is on the printed form ) 
a true copy is put in, Exhibit No. 18£. I cannot now remember the precise time I heard 
that Messrs. Jones & Haycock got the Departmental buildings. I did make out the sche- 
dule with Mr. Stent for the Departmental buildings, in the way I have spoken of. I now 
look at the contract between the Commissioner of Public Works and Jones, Haycock & 
Clarke. I know the signatures of Messrs. Haycock & Clarke. I am not certain of the 
siguature of Mr. Jones. The respective signatures of Messrs. Haycock & Clarke are set in 
the contract opposite their seals, and they have both signed the specification and schedules 
attached to the contract, and the conditions on the specifications and schedules attached to 
contract. The conditions on the specifications, as it was exhibited to the contractors, have 
been erased, but I put in a printed form containing them, signed by me, exhibit No. 19. 
The schedule attached to this contract is the one prepared by Mr. Stent and me, above- 
mentioned. The figures in it are mine ; it is on the same printed form as exhibited to 
contractors. I now look at the contract between the Commissioners of Public Works and 
Charles Garth. I know his signature j his name and signature is opposite his seal to the 
contract, and his signature to the schedules attached. 



30th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 

Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau 

When Mr. Page came up, an estimate was made of the expense of roofing the boiler 
house, setting the boiler, building the main shaft, and doing everything about finishing the 
boiler house and shaft in the Parliament building. The estimate of the architects furnish- 
ed Mr. Page was $20,000. Mr. McGreevy afterwards objected to this estimate, and made 
one himself, amounting to over $30,000. Mr. McGreevy told me Mr. Cauchon had 
directed him to go on with the work at his own estimate, without reference to the estimate 
of the architects, and he- did proceed with trie work to the extent we now find it, but I 
understood it was to be checked by Mr. Page afterwards to see which was the proper one. 
From the 9th to the 12th April, 1860, Mr. Garth was here, and gave directions about the 
ducts, and he saw some prepared for the eastern Departmental building; and he did not 
return till June. After he left, the ducts Were begun on the Parliament building, and the 
foreman, by mistake, made some fine bouchard work instead of pick-faced ; I saw and 
stopped him, and before Mr. Garth returned there were about 6,000 feet of picked work 
done. It was at my own suggestion the fine work was stopped. I was ordered, in the 
month of July, to make preparations for the Prince. This took me away and occupied 
me till the end of August, and I did little about the works but occasionally to look at them. 
After this I had leave of absence, and then was occupied at the accounts till near the 
close of the building season. By Mr. Garth's plan, the duct from the north to its junc- 



68 



tion with the duct from the library was eight feet ; this accounts for the extra width of 
excavation there ; and when it was built the walls were thick, to obviate arches. It was the 
direction of the architects. By Mr. Garth's plan, his downward ventilating ducts were 
shown to be where the principal doors to the legislative chambers and where all the other 
doors arc ; and in another place the walls of two of the angle towers were almost entirely 
cut off by his duct. I put in a schedule of prices of Arnprior marble, (Exhibit No. 20), 
for future reference to the Commissioners. 

(Signed,) John Morris. 



ist SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Joseph Larosb, sworn : 

I am a general builder. I was for 13 years head manager for George Blacklock, 
Imperial Government Contractor at Quebec. For three years after I was engaged in 
building for myself, and I have been in the employment of the Provincial Government, as 
superintendent of work, since 1856. I came here and reported myself to the architects on 
the 7th May, 1861. I was appointed by the Hon Mr. Rose, as an Iuspector to aid in 
carrying on the works of the Parliament Buildings at Ottawa, and to place myself under 
Messrs. Fuller and Jones, the Architects, who told me to make myself acquainted with 
the plans of the buildings, which I did for five or six days. During these days I visited 
the works, and found bad management in setting them out. Masons and bricklayers were 
shifted from one place to another for want of proper places to work. The masons were 
all close to one another on the piers in the basement of both Legislative Chambers, so 
close, that they could not work to advantage, and a great deal of time was lost in this 
manner. I also examined the work then done. The main tower was then to the spring- 
ing of the arches, and the arch stones set. The front walls were up to the height of the 
ground floor windows. The east and west walls of the wings, and the north wall of the 
north tower, were up to the top of the string course under the ground floor windows. 
The north wall of the wings, and the east wall of the lean-to of the main building, were 
about two or three feet above the limestone foundation. The walls of the tower, under 
the Speaker's room on the Legislative Council side, were between 5 and 6 feet above the 
foundation. The interior wall of the Library was about 8 feet from the foundation. The 
outer wall and buttresses were to the surface ot the ground. The remainder of the founda- 
tions throughout the building were up to the level of the basement floor. The bricklayers 
were working on the wall, on the basement of the east wing, the walls on the front part of 
which were up to^he top of the ground floor joists. The walls of the court were up to 
the level of the ground floor joists. The brick work of the rooms on the north and east 
sides of the wings, about four feet above the foundations. The boiler house was up about 
7 feet above the basement floor. No openings had been left for the tramway door. The 
foot flight of steps going to the boiler house was not completed. No interior brick walls 
in front of the building had been commenced from the court of the east wing to the west 
wing, excepting the telegraph room, where there was a small cross wall. In the west 
wing the two tower walls, and the walls between the east and west towers in front, were 
partly up to the top of the ground floor joists. The corridor wall under the room of the 
sergeant-at-arms was built up to the entrance door way. The ducts and drains were 



69 



finished except a piece of duct from the end of the west wing, which was in progress, and 
also a piece in the front each side of the wings, and a small portion of drain cutting the 
duct under the Legislative Assembly Chamber. This duct had been finished but men 
were then engaged in tearing it down to let the drain through. There was a very small 
quantity of brick on the ground, but a larger quantity of stone, which I was told had come 
from Hull, and a great deal also which had come from the excavations. There were 10 
or 15,000 soft brick in the kitchen near the library. From the time I had made myself 
acquainted with the plans for the five or six days I have mentioned, I had nothing given 
me to do till the 16th May, when I asked Mr. Fuller if he would instruct me what I was 
to do. He answered, Mr. Morris would tell me what, to do. Two days after this Mr. 
Morris came aud told me to see that the bricklayers, who were building the walls of the 
circular staircase in the east wing, and part of the circular wall of the staircase to the 
public hall, put plenty of grout and mortar in the walls while he was setting out more 
work for the men. He left the work and I did not see him next day. 

The two days following, I saw him about the library, but got no instructions from 
him. I was disgusted with the way I had been treated, and determined to leave. I 
informed Mr. McGreevy of my intention, and he advised me not to go, and he would see 
Mr. Fuller. The next day Mr. Fuller said he thought I would require a longer time to 
understand the plans. I answered I was competent to carry on any work on plans fur- 
nished me. He then gave me charge of the east wing to carry up the brick work already 
commenced, the year before, aud gave me the plans of the east wing. When I got them, 
I found the interior walls of the three towers were wrong. Two of the walls were not 
according to the plans, one under the Secretary and Treasurer's room, which was 18 
inches out of place j the other under the conference room, on which the brick work was not 
commenced, was two feet out of place. I was ordered to pull down the brickwork on the 
first mentioned wall, and to turn an arch across the room, on which to place the brick 
wall, and to excavate to the rock for a new wall, in place of the other stone wall. 

On the 21st May, I commenced to take charge of the east wing, to carry on the walls 
which had been correctly set out. After I got the plans of the east wing, I found the 
work wrong ; then the architects themselves began to measure it to see if they could adapt 
it to the plan as it ought to have been. The walls were corbelled over to make the rooms 
right. Mr. Rubidge was at Ottawa on the 22nd May, 1861, and saw the works. He 
asked me if there were men sufficient to carry on the work, so as to get it done in time ; I 
said not, but there were more men than could work properly, for the walls were wrong, 
and had to be put right before more men could work. 1 said I did not wish to complain 
of work which had been done before I came, but Mr. Grist, who had been, would tell him 
how they were. He went to him and he showed him how the walls were. 

On the 29th May, I commenced to excavate the foundations for the conference room, 
and to take down the brick wall of the French Translator's room, and alter all the hot air 
and chimney flues in the west wing which had been built wrong the previous year ; but on 
the 3rd June, I received a letter, Exhibit No. 21, dated the 1st June, together with a 
small diagram, which showed me the part of the work I was thenceforward to superintend. 
I put in the plan marked I, of the portion I was to superintend It is marked yellow. It 
contained the main tower and west wing to the Library, and the part of the building west 
of the Legislative Assembly Chamber, but not this chamber, but I had the west lean-to 
of it. On the 4th I received the plans of that part of the building allotted to me. On 
examining them and the work, I found that the interior walls of the two front towers, and 
the corridor walls south and west of the court were also wrong, and all the chimney flues 
and hot air flues throughout the part assigned me were wroug. The foundation walls of 
the French Translator's room to the Conference room, were wrong on this wing as I had 
found them in the east wing ; walls of tramway; main wall of Legislative Assembly room ; 
the walls under water closets ; the walls under the Speaker's passage, and under his 
Secretary's room j the passage walls of the kitchen — were ail wrong, so that they would 
not answer. I informed the architects of it. They came and measured, themselves, and 
found it so. They gave me orders to make new walls or additions, and to corbel over in 
order to save expense. 



70 



Along with this work, I carried on the alteration of the flues in the east wing till the 
8th of June. On this day I left for Quebec, having first given directions to make wrong 
walls right, and other work to employ the men in my absence. I gave my plan to Mr. 
Grist, and Mr. Morris was also to take charge forme. On the 20th of the month I return- 
ed, and found that the flues in the corridor near the public hall had been omitted. I 
spoke to Mr. Morris about it; he said Mr. Garth did not want them, but Mr. Garth, came 
and said it was not so, he must have them, and I tore down the work and made them 
right. A wall between the tower and what had been previously built had been built 4 
inches too thin in my absence. I took my work from Mr. Grist on the 20th, and posses- 
sion of his, during his absence then. I laid out the exterior walls from the wing to the 
Library v\ ith the exception of two cross walls in the lean-to. 

On the 15th July, I took charge of Mr Morris's part of the work. The tramway walls 
in his portion were wrong, and I commenced excavating for new ones, and worked on till 
the 25th. I was frequently the only clerk of works on the building. On the 25th 
July, I left for Quebec, leaving the work in charge of Mr. Grist, and returned on the 29th 
and took charge of my own, Mr. Grist's, and Mr. Morris's work, with the exception of the 
brickwork in the Library, and continued to do so till the work was stopped. Mr. Grist was 
with the measurer. Mr. Morris was absent on leave, and on his retnrn, took no interest in 
the work whatever. I did not measure the work for progress estimates. I gave some few 
dimensions. Mr. Bowes and Mr. Grist measured the work. All the wrong work, and 
the work to put right was measured to the contractors. 

The alterations in the flues were returned as extra days work in the day bills. Mr. 
Morris told me he laid out the east wing himself, and told the foreman to lay out the west 
wing the same, and I found invariably the same mistakes in the one as in the other. 
The foundation walls in the west wing, and west part of the building, are thicker than in 
the east wing. I cannot account for it. I myself was astonished to find it so. They are 
certainly too thick. The Contractor and his foreman laid the blame on Mr. Morris. 

The wall now found 13 feet 6 inches thick from the back of the wing to the corridor 
wall, was made so from the fact that the two walls of 3 feet thick were both wrong. New 
ones had to be built, one between the two, and one outside instead of leaving a few inches 
between each, the whole was made solid, and made it 13 feet 6 inches instead of 12 feet, 
as the four walls would have made it. The walls are from a few inches to two feet too 
thick. The new work laid out by me has not been altered, except a trifling one. No 
error of mine cost the government a shilling. The reason for not lining the outer walls 
with brick as the outer walls are built was, first, the difficulty of having masons and brick- 
layers on the same scaffold, secondly, that on reference to the plan, it will be seen that the 
walls have to contain many flues for hot air, and there is but little bond, excepting where 
the interior walls join the exterior. In these, indents and teeth have been left all along 
the walls. 

The walls of the lower story were not run up like those of the second story. These 
second story walls were in fact partly run up after the works were stopped by Mr. Killaly's 
orders ) for, when the order came to stop the works the walls, were of different heights, and 
in order to enable them to be covered properly, he directed them to be brought to a level, 
and the front wall to have the cornice on. The cornice was not backed, and the interior 
walls were left chiefly at the first floor, except in the west wing where the exterior walls are 
partly up. The brick were not all hard burned brick, but they are good brick for interior 
walls. The exposure since the works stopped subjected them to the weather, and some 
have failed. I forgot to mention another wrong wall, which I found — the wall in the public 
hall, 3 feet 6 inches, or four feet thick, supporting the principal columns, was laid out 
erroneously — it was 15 inches to one side. To remedy it, where the steps came, I built a 
wall 18 inches alongside the other, to support the steps and columns, and I made an arch 
from the wall to the boiler house to support the centre columns. The same thing had to 
be done on the other side of the rubble wall, for both were wrong alike. The wrong 
walls had been built the year before. I do not know by whom. The architects gave me 
the directions to put them right. The piers to carry the columns in the members' lobby, 
in front of both Legislative Chambers, are wrong. The wall on which they were to stand 



71 



was four feet thick, but it has been so built that the columns will have to stand on the 
edge of the walls instead of the centre. This has not been altered yet. The reason why 
the wrong walls have not been taken down and right ones built, was that the architects 
said it would take more to take them down and rebuild them, than to correct them as we 
did. It was cheaper to add 15 inches than to build a new wall. 

I always got the plans when I wanted them. I never saw architects pay more atten- 
tion than they did, after I came. They seemed much annoyed at finding the work wrong. 
The putting in the flues which had been omitted, was given in by me as extra days' work ; 
there were men employed from the time I commenced till August, and their wages 
amounted to about $451.73, for putting right this work. The architects gave me verbal 
orders to do it, and I made the contractors do it. Mr. Morris, in instructing me, gave me 
no plan or orders except to see that plenty of mortar was put in with the brick, and the 
walls grouted. I was not ordered, nor did I order anything about the brick lining. It 
had been done so the year before, and seemed the mode of doing the work. I did object to 
bricks at the front, once or twice, but these were not on the works. The time bills for 
extra days' work are for altering the flues. I have measured for perforating the flags in 
the air ducts, and for skew-backs in the arches in the piers under the members' corridor. 
The arches of which these skew-backs form a part were shown on the plan, but had not 
been put in, when the piers were carried up. I do not recollect speaking to the architects, 
but I did no extra work without asking their instructions. I ordered the skew-backs to be 
put in and they were put in, and I gave the time as extra. I believe it did not exceed 
$12.00. The brick are not as in the specification, but in using my judgment I considered 
the bricks good brick for the interior walls. The work under the boilers is common rough 
rubble masonry. We built walls 5 or 6 feet face, and filled in with small stones and grouted 
them. The excavation in the rock for the boiler house was 2 feet 10 inches, on the 
average, two deep, and we had to build it up again, with rough rubble masonry, partly 
done, and partly to do. The part excavated too much had an area of 74 by 68, and was 
2 feet 10 inches deep. This made about 527 yards erroneously excavated. I allow the ducts 
as equal to the thickness of the walls, the foundations of which were also erroneously exe- 
cuted. They are about 6 feet thick. Some part was excavated 3 feet 8 inches, some 2 
feet 2 inches ; the average was 2 feet 6 inches. 

All this had to be filled in again with masonry. There is in the boiler house an 
area of wall, 105 feet by 7 feet faced with heavy cut stone, uselessly. It would have been 
better rough rubble work, for brick work had to be built against it. There is also pick 
faced masonry behind the stairs to the boiler house. The exterior walls of the Parliament 
Building on the east and west sides are corbelled over the foundation from nothing to six 
inches, but they are not corbelled over the plumb of the upper wall. I have no personal 
knowledge of who made the mistakes in the boiler house excavation and masonry. There 
are hot air flues in the external walls, but whrt I have said about the prevalence of flues, 
applies to the interior walls chiefly. The deafening boards of the ground floor wall rest 
on the brick walls, and slope in some cases downward toward the walls, and run the wet 
against them. The deafening boards were to have been 1£ inches square, and half an 
inch apart, instead of which they are now inch boards without space between them. 
This change was made, because, on an experimental trial, concrete thrown nearly broke 
the 1£ inch pieces, and they were changed as they now are, in consequence. 

The ten and fifteen thousand brick which I would not have used were afterwards, by 
Mr. Morris's order, used in the walls of the vault, built by Ryan the master brick-layer. 



72 



1 8th AUGUST, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau, 

Joseph Larose, further examined : 

Two ducts run from the boiler house in the Parliameni Building, one west, the other 
south. They were excavated 2 feet 10 inches lower than they ought to have been, and 
the drain under the western is 2 feet 10 iuches deeper than it ought to have been. The 
excavations were made to suit the erroneous depth to which the bottom of the boiler house 
was excavated. This increased the excavation and the filling in, but not the masonry in 
them. I do not know who laid the excavation out, or directed it. The excavation for the 
western duct and drain is about 15 feet wide on the top, and 10 feet at bottom, and from 
16 to 17 feet deep. Ihave seen the rock under the west part of the building. There was 
no necessity for excavating the rock from the surface for the interior walls. 

I think even where the rock was at the surface, it was proper to put the foundation 
of the outer wall 3 feet under, to prevent the frost from getting under the foundation, but 
it was not necessary in the interior walls. The great extra expense in this building arose 
from erroneous and unnecessary excavations, aod erroneous and excessive thickness of 
walls in the foundations, erroneous and unnecessary depths and sizes of excavations 
for duQts and drains, and useless and expensive masonry in the boiler house 
and ducts. There was a great deal of useless expense in extra day labour, 
in levelling the rock in the Library. It could have stepped up just as well. 
There is a tramway through under the whole building to allow the passage of a 
horse and cart, to take fuel to the boiler house, and take away snow from the court if 
necessary. It is 7 feet high to the^springing of the arch, and 7 feet wide. The side walls 
are brick 9 inches thick with piers one and a half brick thick at every door, and on a 
stone foundation. Its length is about 100 feet on each side of the boiler house. 

The boiler house wall had been erroneously built where the tramway was to run, and 
had to be pulled down, and the jambs built on the sides. This was extra. I do not know 
who made the error. The mismanagement was not during the summer I was there, for 
the architects were attentive and the contractors did every thing they were required to do. 
Mr. McGreevy was not there always himself, but his brother, who was his manager, was 
constantly on the works. I believe the brick work was sublet, but it was the brick laying 
only, not the material. I am acquainted with the modes of measurement in Quebec and 
Montreal j beds and joints are not measured in either place. The toise of masonry is 72 
feet French measure or 84 feet English. A wall under 2 feet is measured as 2 feet, and 
all openings measured as solid, under ten feet wide. In the main tower the rubble columns 
had been built with the wall, at least they were in when I came. They ought not to have 
been built in, and were taken out, because the settlement of the wall crushed the bands 
of Ohio stone between the different parts of them. The cornice, which appears now crooked 
and somewhat damaged, did not fall, but was tipped over. The masons had commenced 
it from both sides and were about to close it in the centre. The shears were in the inside 
of the building, and when they were hoisting the last stone of the first cornice, the men 
carelessly allowed it to catch under the projecting corner of the cornice stones inside. 
This tipped them up, and that part of the cornice fell from the opening to near the west 
tower. It was injured a little but put up again. No part fell by its being corbelled over too 
much, or want of cramps. No cramps were specified, and I had no conversation with Mr. 
Mori is about them. The contractor put the cramps in himself j he stated the cramps were 
to be removed in the spring, when the cornice was backed, and what was crooked reset in 
the spring. I now wish to explain why I allowed brick not agreeing with the letter of 



73 



the specification into the building. When the specification was made, a large part of the 
exterior wall was to be brick. They were required to be hard, of course, but the schedule 
spoke of two kinds, one for exterior and one for interior walls, as I understood. Using 
my own judgment in reference to these, I allowed the brick to be put in, which are now 
found in the walls, quite good ior interior wall if protected. 

(Signed) Joseph Larose. 



Jean Baptiste Tison, sworn. 

I am a measurer by profession in the city of Montreal. I have followed it 25 years. 
I am acquainted with the mode of measurement, and prices of builders' work in Montreal. 
A toise of rubble masonry is 72 French feet, or 87 feet English measure. A toise of 
quarry stone contains 216 French feet cubic, or a pile 6 feet on every side. These we 
measure by a French rule, but we apply the English measure to work executed. Cut 
stone of all classes of work is measured on the face only ; we allow in arch work double the 
soffit; in rubble masonry, openings under ten feet are counted at solid; over ten feet, half of 
the opening is deducted. In measuring buildings like these I see, for rubble work, I 
should measure the whole woik, excluding half the openings over ten feet in width. If 
walls are under two feet thick they are measured as two feet, but if over, the excess is 
measured with the wall, and the whole cubed and reduced to a toise of 87 feet. Brick 
work is measured by the thousand, deducting all openings, flues, and fire places; 20 bricks 
are allowed to a foot, but our bricks are smaller than those I see here. Seventeen of the 
brick I see on these buildings, will make a foot. Rock and earth excavation is measured 
by the cubic yard. Moulded cut stone work is girthed; circular work is doubly measured. 
Earth excavation is done in Montreal for 15 cents per yard ; carted away, for filling and 
ramming, the same price. Rock excavation in Montreal is done for between $1,20 to $1,50 
per cubic yard, any depth to 18 or 20 feet ; over this, 50 per cent in addition. Rubble 
stone is delivered at Montreal for $6 to $8 a toise of 216 French feet. 

Rubble work of a toise of 87 feet in the wall, is there worth $6 to $7. At this rate 
a labourers' wages is 70 to 80 cents ; masons' $1,20 to $1,50 ; lime about 16 J cents or 
lOd a bushel. River sand in Montreal is worth $1,69 per yard, pit sand $1,00 per yard. 
Bricks in Montreal are worth $5 to $5,50 a thousand, mixed half hard, half soft. Measured 
in the wall, they are worth $8 a thousand. I am not acquainted with Ohio stone ; pick- 
faced masonry, including stone, is worth 20 cents ; the work on it 10 cents. Rough bou- 
chard work, including stone, 25 cents a foot ; work alone 12 cents. Fine bouchard work, 30 
cents, including stone ; work alone 15 cents a foot. In measuring walls faced with cut stone, 
the cut stone is included in the rubble work, and this pays for setting it ; the rubble stone 
itself being measured and paid for, as I have above stated. In measuring arches, nothing 
is allowed for centres. The prices I have mentioned would apply to the work of the 
classes I have seen here in the ducts, except those in the boiler houses, which, including 
stone, is worth 60 cents a foot, measured on the face only. Large blocks for cut stone are 
worth from 20 to 80 cents per cubic foot, according to size in Montreal ; none of the large 
class is used in these buildings. -To prepare limestone for courted rubble work, such as I 
see in these buildings, would cost 5 cents a foot in Montreal limestone. Rubbled limestone 
over fine bouchard work would be worth 5 cents a foot extra ; moulded work 10 cents a 
foot, over bouchard work. Slate work such as I see here is worth in Montreal $7 a square, 
with felt $8. Gravel roofs are worth from $4,50 to $5 a square. Tongued and grooved 
boarding 1 J inch thick, for roofs, in Montreal is worth $3,50 a square. The lumber used 
for this is worth $15,50 to $16 a thousand feet, superficial. Flooring in Montreal, laid, is 
worth $4,50 for 1J inch and $5 for 1J inch stuff. 

(Signed,) J. B. Tison. 

10 



74 



William Haughy, sworn : 

I am a Stone Cutter and Mason by trade ; I have followed the business about 18 
years. I was general foreman for Mr. McGreevy on the Parliament buildings. T. came 
at the commencement of the work, and continued till their close, excepting from about the 
loth March, till the 1 5th May, 1860. From the commencement in January, 1860, till I 
left in March, we had cleared the site of the old Barracks, fences, and rubbish, which were 
upon it, and had begun to excavate the main west drain from the Parliament building. 
When I returned, the excavations for the foundations for the Library had been completed, 
and the walls begun. They were building the cold air ducts which cross the library. 
The main duct to the boiler house they had got to its depth. It is low, excepting the 
corner which they were blasting, and they were building in it. They were excavating 
clay, earth, and loose rock, under the Legislative Council chamber, and towards the main 
tower, but bad not done auy rock excavation till after my return. Mr. Burns had charge of 
the works in my absence. There was a set of plans of the building in a room to which I 
had access, but I had not time to run up every day to refer to them, nor did I 
think it my business to refer to thera. I thought it the business of the 
[nspectors, and L had no plans for a while, but directions from Mr. Morris 
from scraps of paper. About the 25th June, I got a tracing of the plan of the whole 
foundation from Mr. Morris j it was the plan I worked from. On my return I took charge 
of the works. I started and continued the walls of the cold air ducts from the boiler house, 
both east and west, and north and south. I next commenced the wall north of the read- 
ing room of the Legislative Council, from directions given me by Mr. Morris. It was built 
about 9 inches south of its proper place, according to the basement walls as they were put 
upon it. This causes the basement wall to overhang the foundation. The east outer wall 
of the speaker's office was built about 4 feet too far in, by order of Mr. Morris, and after 
it was about 4 feet high, it was left, and is there still, and the wall built in its proper 
place. Mr. Morris told me each side was to be alike. I took a square, and set off the 
wall of the reading room of the Legislative Assembly, in the same way, and it is too far 
south, and the basement wall overhangs it in the same way. The next work we did was 
in the walls of the Legislative Council Chamber. On the south portion of it, mistakes 
were made, and the erroneous walls are found there. He gave me directions for all the 
walls marked on the plan D, within the line traced by him, and also the Speaker's office, 
which he has not included. I had the plan he gave me, and he told me to lay off the 
walls as marked on the plan. He gave me also the length and depth of the east wing, 
and the whole distance from the centre point of the building to the extreme east point, 
and from that to the north point, and from that north, to the north-east angle of the Par- 
liament building. He told me that the west was to be the same as the east, and I made 
it so ; and to preveat mistakes, I used in Mr. Morris' absence to ask Mr. Grist where cer- 
tain angles and walls were to be made, and he would answer me he did not know. I was 
not very particular about making the wall 5 or 6 inches either way, rather than have the 
men idle, and I laid them out as I best could over rough ground. Mr. Grist made re- 
marks sometimes that the walls were too thick, but it was after they were up he would say 
so. In many places the plans did not show the thickness, and seeing the Inspector so 
careless, 1 was not going to stand about the thickness, and keep Mr. McGreevy 's men 
idle. 

Mr. Morris made some slight remark one day, about a wall that appeared rather 
thick, and concluded by saying it did not matter much, as it would give something to come 
and go on a more exact setting out, that would be on the ground floor, and to get the corri- 
dor on a straight line. I did not ask Mr. Morris or hear Mr. McGreevy ask to be allowed 
to make the walls thicker to get rid of the rough material. The walls are thick because 
I had no proper directions. I wanted the Inspectors to see that they were right, before 
they were built upon, and they did not do it, and I did not consider it was my business to 
lay down lines. When the basement walls came to be laid down, the foundation walls 
were frequently found wrong, and new pieces were built to them, and sometimes new walls. 
Some stood on the edge ; and some were corbelled over. I believe the walls were allowed 
to Mr. McGreevy by Mr. Grist, just as they were found. I do not know who directed 
the excavating of .the ducts and boiler house. 1 believe it was Mr. Morris. I should 



75 



say the excavation on the south front of the east wing was 7 feet on an average wider than 
the building, taking into accouut what would slide down ; alcng the south front to the 
angle of the east tower of west wing, 7 feet; round the main tower, 7 feet; along the west 
half of the south front, 4 feet 6 inches ; and around the west to the angle of the library, 
4 feet 6 inches- From the south east angle of the building round to the angle of the 
library on the east side, 4 feet 6 inches on an average. 

Mr. McGreevy paid his labourers from 75 to 90 cents ; quarrymon, SI. 00 ; masons, 
$1.40 to $1.75 ; bricklayers, the same ; stone cutters, most of them, $1.75 ; carpenters 
and joiners, $1.40 to $1.75 ; foremen, from $1.50 to $4.00 per day. 

There was a great deal of delay in getting directions about the boiler house from Mr. 
Morris, and other great delays caused in carrying the main drain from the west under 
the walls of the Legislative Council on to the boiler house, and great delay in waiting for 
the stone for heavy weatherings, for the main tower, a heavy kind of stone that was re- 
quired, and great delay in waiting for Arnprior marbles for the columns for the main tow- 
er. Mr. Morris would have them in ; as the tower was built they were taken out again, 
for the main tower in settling crushed the Ohio stone bands in the middle of them. 
There was also delay in laying out the brickwork in May, 1861. I do not remember how 
wide I was told to make the main sewer from the west, but it is not wider, I believe, thau 
was necessary to get to its depth, and to back the cut stone to the rock. It was Mr. 
Morris told me that the walls of the air duct over the main sewer would answer for the 
tramway, and they were uselessly carried across the Legislative Assembly room, as they 
were not on a line with the tramway on the other side of the building. 

In the circular wall at the angle of the main entrance, I got directions from Mr. 
Morris to make it thick enough, and I did it. It is from 1 foot 6 inches to nothing around 
the quadrant. All these walls in front were put there under Mr. Morris' eye, and if he 
did not say exactly where they ought to be, he was there to see them, and did not object 
to them. The walls between these quadrants are built according to Mr. Morris' figures, as 
I have them. They are 18 inches out of their place, so that the columns in the public 
hall will stand on the edge of the walls. I have examined plan K. (No. XIV.) I see 
upon it Mr. Grist's figures of the depths of the rock excavations within the building. I 
should think his depths as there marked were taken rather under than over the depths. I did 
not pay myself much attention to this. It was a man called John Conway who had 
charge of the men who excavated the rock, and Bernard Dunning also had charge. I can- 
not venture an opinion as to the depth of the excavation inside the building, as I am not 
sure. I was mistaken in speaking of the excavation around the main tower, and in front 
of the building from the anode on east side of the west tower to the west angle of the east 
tower. The excavation would average 7 feet 6 inches beyond the walls. I omitted to 
state there were delays to the contractor in the year 1860 in the change from Brockville 
to Ohio stone in the windows and weathering of the towers in the east and west wings. 
Another great delay was waiting for instructions on alterations in the Library in reference 
to thickening the walls and buttresses, and for a decision to do away with hollow walls 
about the Library and towers of the wings, to add buttresses to the boiler house walls, ind 
lean-to of the Legislative Chambers. 

These delays caused the men to be crowded on the foundations, and made confusion, 
and loss on the works to the contractor, and this occurred in May and June, 1861. In 
starting the wall in front of the east wing, I asked Mr. Morris how thick the wall was to 
be ; he said 6 feet, and I made it so. I have seen the architects about the building, but 
they never gave me any directions about the thickness of the walls; it was Mr. Morris. I 
did not see the architects checking in any way the foundation walls. I have seen Mr. 
Grist taking measurements, but he never told me whether the walls were right or wrong 
till it was too late ; when I asked anything he said he did not know. Mr. McGreevy told 
me to do nothing without the direction of Mr. Morris or the architects. One time he told 
me not to mnke any alterations without their written order. When I wanted instructions 
from Mr. Morris, he would not be found; and when I asked Mr. Grist, he would not know, 
so I had to do the best I could with the plan. I had to keep the men from being idle. 
I set out the walls with the footings aj> the plan showed and carried the foundation wall 



76 



that thick all the way up to the basement wall, as I understood Mr. Morris to say they 
were to be so carried up to the brickwork. 

The cutstone for the ducts was most of it made from stone from the excavation; rough 
stuff it was, and most of the foundations were built of stone from the excavation, and the 
rubble walls of the ducts were mostly built of the stone from the excavation. In my opinion 
it would have been cheaper to have brought stone, than to have used such rough stuff. 
Where chimney breaks were shown on the plans, they were built solid across the whole 
walls, because it was easier in using the rough stuff to do it, and no one objected to it. It 
was easier to build thick walls with these rough stones than thin ones, and seeing there 
was no objection, I put the walls in thick. No one objected to the thick walls excepting on 
the occasions I have mentioned. I was in Mr. McGreevy's interest, and I did not stop 
about the thickness of a wall, in keeping men idle for instructions. The foundation walls 
in front were from 6 to 18 feet in depth ; in rear of the wings from 7 to 13 feet ; in the 
north part from 3 to 4 feet. The thickness of the foundation walls was from 2 to 6 feet. 
Where duct walls and division walls came near each other they would be made solid. 
This occurred whenever they were within 18 inches of each other, for it was easier to do 
it than face the walls. In the west wing there is a wall about 13 feet 6 inches. Two 
walls of 3 feet each were built out of place. Two more had to be built ; this would have 
made 12 feet ; but because they were near each other, they were made solid, and the wall 
13- feet 6 inches thick. I do not remember Mr. McGreevy giving me any instructions 
about the thickness of the walls. I remember once his noticing their thickness. He 
shrugged his shoulders, and said it could not be helped from the roughness of the stuff. 
The drain from the boiler house is low enough to drain the excavation; and, if it is lower 
than it ought to be, the drain is so also. I do not know how low it was to be excavated. 
The air ducts were made as low as the excavation in the boiler house, for all was on a level 
before the vails were started. 

The marble columns ought not to have been put in while the work was building. The 
division walls in the foundation were generally carried, up with the outer walls. In the 
basement, the division walls were not generally carried up with the outer walls, but tooth- 
ing in the walls was left for them, and in the first floor, some division walls were carried 
up. These were left till the outer walls were up a piece. In the second floor only, one 
or two have been built. In some places it was more convenient to do it this way, in regard 
to attendance. The boiler house walls were built, about May, June and July, 1860. The 
main doors were built up, I suppose, because no directions were given about them ; and al- 
though Mr. Morris said there were to be stairs, we had no directions ; and pick-faced 
masonry was in part built behind where the stairs now are; but Mr. Burns can explain to 
what extent this occurred. I think the piek-f; ced work in the boiler house was up to the 
height it now is, about the 1st September, 1860. The hot air and ventilating flues were 
in some instances started below wrong ; and, in the upper walls, they came into contact 
with openings, and their direction had to be altered. This arose from want of proper in- 
structions in starting them at the bottom. The plan may have been right. This has 
caused a good deal of useless work. The cut stone was worked by the day ; and I think on 
an average that one man with another, taking into account the rough ground, refuse stone, 
and the large size and weighty nature of the different kinds to be cut, could cut 6 feet 6 
inches per day. 

(Signed,) Wm. Haughy, 



77 



3rd SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Samuel Keefer, Sworn : 

I am Deputy Commissioner of Public Works*. I have been so since the 9th May 
1859. I assumed my official duties on the 10th. My duties are partly defined by the 
act relating to public works, and partly by the civil service act. I understand my duty 
to be to attend to the practical and professional part of the Department, and its routine 
business, which is generally done by report to the Commissioner when he is present, but 
when he is absent, I act for him, and when any difficulty occurs I report to the Council, 
as I am allowed to do by the statute, and I am generally put in communication with some 
member of the government to advise with in the Commissioner's absence. 

Before I assumed my office, the notice for competing plaus and designs had been pre- 
pared and sent to the printer. It was published on the 10th May. The first thing the 
Commissioner directed me to do was to attend to it.; but I had no opportunity, and it came 
out before I saw it. In reference to these buildings, the first thing I did was to look 
over, revise, and approve of the amount of accommodation required for the Legislative 
buildings, the Government departments, and the residence of His Excellency, which had 
been prepared by Mr. Rubidge, who bears the title of assistant engineer and architect of 
the Department of Public Works. In referring to dates, I say, I keep a journal, and 
from that I speak of dates. 

I was desired to be at Ottawa on the 21st May 1859, to attend the Governor General 
and a portion of his Council, who had come to visit the place, and look out a site for the 
buildings. I remained till the 23rd May. There were present His Excellency, the Hon. 
Mr. Vankoughnet, Mr. Cayley, and Mr. Killaiy. There may have been others. We 
visited Barrack Hill, the Major Hill, and Ashburnham Hill, a place to the west of this. 
There seemed to be no difference of opinion about Barrack Hill being the place for these 
buildings ; but there wos difference of opinion about the other place for the Governor 
General's residence; and although there were different opinions, I understood it was settled 
to be on Major's hill, a place east of the canal containing about 40 acres, and opposite 
Barrack Hill, the Rideau canal being between them. The Government offices at Toronto 
were closed on the 14th and opened at Quebec on the 28th July 1859, and the Com- 
missioner left for England on the 23rd July, and I was in charge till his return on 22nd 
September. Although the offices were closed, the Governor General and his Council re- 
mained at Toronto till after the 27th August. 

I do not remember when the plan showing the levels of the sites of these buildings 
which had been made by Mr. Slater, was prepared. We had it when Mr. Morris was at 
the office giving instructions to intending tenderers about the plans. It had been made 
sometime previous to that. There were no test-pits sunk to ascertain the true state of 
the foundations. There could not properly be, until the plans were received, as we could 
not know in what shape they would be. The competing plans were received at Quebec 
and Toronto, not later than the 1st August. On the 2nd August I was desired to send 
all the plans which had been received at Quebec to Toronto, and I did it immediately. 
On the 13th I got a summons to go to Toronto, to consider and report upon the designs, 
and I was desired to bring Mr Rubidge with me. I left Quebec for Toronto on the 15th 
and arrived on the evening of the 16th, and I began the examination on the 17th with 
Mr. Rubidge whom I found there. I took the plans to the Parliament buildings in 
Toronto, where there was room, and had them extended on the walls where they could 
be seen and properly examined, and where the public had access to them. 



T8 



Mr. Rubidge had fallen in with Mr. Morris, who was then engaged on the University 
buildings, and he brought him down to assist in the examination. We examined the 
plans, and Mr. Rubidge made his report to me on the 23rd August 1859. It is printed 
in the blue book, page 13 ; aud I made my first report to His Excellency on the 25th. It is 
published, blue book, page 12. On the 26th August I received the letter of William H. 
Lee, Esq , and the memorandum of the Governor General dated the 25th August, with a 
view to the reconsideration of the report of myself and Mr. Rubidge. This letter and 
memorandum are the last documents printed in the blue book after the errata. Upon this 
I made my report of the 2Tth August, (see blue book, page 15J,) and upon this report the 
Order in Council of the 27th was made. On being informed of this order in Council, the 
architects repaired to Quebec, and I gave my instructions to Messrs. Fuller and Jones on 
the 9th September, and to Messrs. Stent and Laver on the 14th September. 

these instructions are printed in the blue book, pages 20, 21, 22, 23, and were made 
by me after a full consideration of the plans by myself, Mr. Rubidge, the architects of the 
respective buildings and Mr. Morris. Before these instructions had been written or 
given to the architects, and on the 8th of September, the notice to contractors for the 
buildings had been issued. The notice is printed in the blue book, page 19. It stated 
that " sealed tenders will be received at this office until Tuesday the first day of November 
next at noon, for the erection of the Parliamentary and Departmental buildings in the 
city of Ottawa, in accordance with the plans and specifications, which may be seen on 
application at the offices of the architects in Ottawa and Toronto, on and after the 15th 
day of October next. For information relative to the Parliamentary buildings, parties 
will apply to Messrs. Fuller and Jones, architects, Ottawa and Toronto, and in reference 
to the Departmental buildings, to Messrs Stent and Laver, Ottawa, and for both, at 
this office. The tenders are to be addressed to the Secretary of Public Works, Quebec, 
and endorsed, tenders for Public Buildings, Ottawa, and to be signed by two or more re- 
sponsible persons, who are willing to become security for the due performance of the 
contract. Printed forms of tender will be supplied, and no tender will be received un- 
less in accordance with the form." 

This early notice was given that there might be no delay in letting the contracts, 
and was done at the instance of the Hon. Mr. Vankoughnet, and Mr. Sherwood, two 
members of the Government. The instructions to Messrs. Fuller and Jones of the 9th 
September, and to Messrs. Stent and Laver of the 14th September, were the instructions 
given to the architects to prepare the plans for intendiug tenderers. While these plans 
were being prepared, Mr. Morris was sent to Ottawa, and elsewhere, to examine the stone 
and other material about Ottawa, and report. His instructions are dated 9th September 
1859, (Exhibit No. 22,) and his report is dated 4th October 1859, (Exhibit No. 23.) 

It was found that there was not time for the architects to make the plans ready, and 
a postponement took place till the 15th November, for receiving tenders. The matured 
plans were not received till between the 15th and 30th October, and from that time till 
the 15th November, there was not time to sink test pits to ascertain the actual founda- 
tions and adapt the plans to them. And if I had given the architects instructions to 
modify their plans, I could not myself have given instruction as to the sinking of the 
test pits until the plans were matured; and even if test pits had been sunk, the plans must 
have been modified afterwards, which there was not time to do. 

There were no instructions given to architects, as to the positive levels of the ground, 
although we had a plan showing these. The plan I now see marked H, is a tracing of the 
plan snowing the levels of the ground. I say, that from the time plans were received, 
although the position of the buildings is shown on the plan, and it was not put there till 
after the contract plans were made, and there was not time to sink test pits, and make the 
plans in accordance with the levels. And after consultation with the architects as wc 
had to show something definite to the contractors to tender upon, it was agreed that an 
assumed line of five feet under the finished surface of the ground, or of two feci under the 
assumed ground line would be a fair average for the level of the foundations, and the 
plans were accordingly made so. The plan shows the difference of lev^l of the ground 
between the east and we?t, of the front of the Parliament building, to be on the southern 



79 



facade, 5 feet two inches; between the north and south points, through the Library, 1 foot 5 
inches. We had then no knowledge of the rock, except where it cropped out at the Library. 
My impression then was that the rock would be found a few inches under the surface 
anywhere. The difference between the level of the ground at the south east angle of the 
western Departmental biock, and the south west angle of the eastern block, was 8 feet 8 
inches ; between the south and north of the eastern Departmental buildings 2 inches ; 
between the south and north of the western Departmental buildings, 7 feet 8 inches. There 
must, in exhibiting plans to contractors, be an actual or an assumed line. There was not 
time to exhibit the actual one, and it was arranged with my consent that the assumed line 
should be exhibited. I knew there would be extra work in the foundations, but I had no 
idea how much. The plans were got up in so hurried a manner, we had not time to con- 
sider them maturely, and we adopted a system of question and answer to afford informa- 
tion alike to all parties. They are attached to these contracts. 

We were exhibiting plans in three places, and as one question was answered in one 
place, we telegraphed the answer to all the places. Tenders were received in the office 
of the Department till noon of the 15th of November 1859, and conveyed unopened to the 
clerk of the Executive Council. They were opened by the Executive Council, and after- 
wards returned to the Department of Public Works for report. I made my two reports of 
the 17th November to the Commissioner, and the Commissioner on the 17th November to 
the Council, who, on the 22nd November made the Order in Council. (Blue book, page 
25.) After noon on the 15th November, nine tenders were received, and as they were too 
late, they were not opened, and are now shown to the Commissioner yet unopened. The 
order in Council of the 22nd accepted the tender of Mr. McGreevy for all the buildings 
although no schedule had been attached to his tender, but he was directed by the order 
in Council to prepare a schedule of prices to the satisfaction of the Department of Public 
Works. 

On or about the 29th November, he sent in the schedule of prices, one for the Par- 
liament Building, and one for the Departmental Buildings, but they are not signed by 
him, although referred to in his letter of the 29th November. These were not accepted 
as satisfactory, because the prices were exaggerated, and if he had been paid on them, he 
would have i een paid the full amount of his contract, long before the work was done. The 
quantities, estimated at these prices, would have exceeded the contract very materially. A 
good deal of time was lost in connection with these schedules ; the Department could not 
agree to them, and they had to be prepared so that both parties could agree. These 
schedules of Mr. MeGreevy's were given to the architects and Mr. Morris, to prepare 
others adapted to his contract. They did prepare them, and they were attached to Mr. 
MeGreevy's contract, and signed by him. The architects were responsible that the prices 
in the schedules should agree with the bulk, sum of the contract. It is the practice of 
the Department to have schedules of prices such as these, for architectural buildings, 
although neither the notice to contractors nor the form of tender required schedules of 
prices to be given. Printed schedules were issued with the forms, and it was intended 
such schedules should be delivered with the tender, and it was generally so understood. 
The heading of the printed schedule alluded to the fixed rates and prices therein, as 
forming the basis of the accompanying estimate and tender. 

I do not recollect that Mr. McGreevy in any communication he had with me, ever stated 
that the notice for tenders did not require him to give a schedule of prices. 



80 



4th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : * 

JOHN WILSON, Q. <?., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Samuel Keefer, — Eaniination continued. 

A copy of the Departmental order with reference to tenders for Public Build- 
ings at Ottawa, dated 12th November, 1859, I put in (No. 21) ; also, my 
report on the tenders, dated the 17th November, 1859 (No. 25) ; also, copy 
of my letter to the Commissioner, dated the 17th November, 1859 (No. 26) ; 
also, copy of Mr. McGreevy's letter, dated 16th November, respecting fire-proofing 
(No. 27) ; also, copy of the Report of the Commissioner, dated 17th November 
(No. 28) ; also, copy of the letter from the Department, dated 24th November, 
telling Mr. McGreevy upon what conditions his tender would be received, — among others, 
that he should prepare and submit schedules of prices to the satisfaction of the Depart- 
ment, (No. 29,) to which Mr. McG-reevy's letter of the 29th is an answer ; also, his letter 
of the 30th, and the Commissioner's Report to His Excellency the same day, — to all of 
which I refer (No. 30.) I did not recommend the acceptance of McGrreevy's tender. On 
inspection of the schedules submitted by McGreevy, the prices were so arranged, that on 
all the work be had first to do he would have drawn two or three times the value of the 
work, and the prices were generally higher than the bulk sum warranted. 

From conferring with him, I saw it was utterly hopeless to expect from him a schedule 
which would be satisfactory, and I directed the architects to prepare one, so as to be ap- 
plicable to the tender, and they did so. I then told Mr. McGreevy that these schedules 
had been prepared in accordance with the bulk sum of his contract, and unless he agreed 
to them he could not get the contract. He would not agree that they should apply to 
extra work, but to the progress estimates on the contract work alone. He objected to the 
clause in the form of contract which the Department had been using, and which had been 
exhibited to intending tenderers, which clause, No. 7 of the printed form, 1 now put in, 
marked Exhibit No. 31. He said he would not do extra work to be estimated by our 
officers. About this time the contract was being drawn by the Attorney General, and in 
reference to the last clause of the contract, which was drawn by the Attorney General, 
the words are modified, and it is stated " that if any change, alteration, or addition either 
in position or details of the works embraced in this contract, or in any material there- 
for, shall be required by the Commissioner, the contractor will make such change, alter- 
ation, or addition, and if such change, alteration, or addition, shall entail extra expense 
on the contractor, either in labour or materials, the same shall be allowed to the con- 

ractor, or should it be a saving to the contractor, in either labour or materials, the same 

hall be deducted from the amount of this contract." 

When the notice to tenderers was issued, I understood that all extra work was to be 
paid for by the prices mentioned in the schedules; they were prepared and headed with 
this view. T made no report to the Government of Mr. McGreevy having spoken of con- 
ditions in regard to the schedule. I reported it to the Commissioner. All the objections 
Mr. McGreevy made to the schedule were made before the contract or schedules were 
signed. I now look at the original contract between Her Majesty, represented by the 
Commissioner of Public Works, and Mr. McG-reevy, and say, that the schedule attached 
to it is on the same printed form which had been issued with the forms of tender, and is 
the one prepared under my direction by the architects. I see that this schedule has been 
signed at the top and bottom by Mr. McGreevy, and the prices in the heading apply to 
extra and additional work, as was intended by the Department of Public Works, when the 
tender was received, it should do. I do not remember being present when the contract 
was signed. There were conditions annexed to the specification, as exhibited to tenderers, 



81 



but they were struck out of the specification which I see attached to the contract. T 
understood they had been in substance embodied in the contract. The contract, 
as I now see it, was delivered to the Department of Public Works, and is in its posses- 
sion. 

I have now before me the contract for the Departmental Buildings entered into be- 
tween Her Majesty, represented by the Commissioner of Public Works, and Messrs. Jones, 
Haycock and Clarke. I see the schedule of prices attached to it. This is on the same 
printed form which was shown to intending tenderers, aud is headed, " to apply to extra 
and additional work." It appears to be signed at top and bottom by the contractors. It is 
the schedule of prices prepared by the architects under my directions, as applicable to 
McGreevy's teuder for the Departmental Buildings. While these schedules were being 
prepared, Mr. McG-rcevy, on the 1st December, wrote to the Commissioner to say that in 
order to secure the speedy erectiou of the Government Buildings at Ottawa, if the Gov- 
ernment acceded, they might let the Departmental Buildings be given to Messrs. Jones & 
Co., of Upper Canada. Upon this, the Commissioner reported to the Government on the 
2nd December, 1859 (Sea blue book, page 31) j and by an order in Council of the 5th 
December, Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., were substituted for Mr. McGreevy, for the 
Departmental Buildings ; and the schedule of prices which had been prepared for Mr. 
McGreevy, for the Departmental Buildings, was attached to their contract for these 
Buildings, as I now find it. I had no communication with them on the subject of the 
schedule. I do not know on what principle the Commissioner did away with the 
schedules, as applying to extra or additional work, attached to the contract, nor what the 
agreement was in reference to it; but I understood from the Commissioner that the extra 
and additional work was to be paid for at fair price?, aud inferred the schedules were not to 
apply to extra or additional work. I understood from the Hon. Mr. Rose, that it had been 
settled between him and Mr. McGreevy, that the schedule of prices in the schedule pre- 
pared for the contract should not apply to extra or additional work, but to the progress 
estimates on the contr-act ouly. All this was settled befere the contracts were signed, and 
in this view of it I consider it a clerical error, in not having the schedule made according 
to this arrangement. After I had told Mr. McGreevy that he must agree to the schedules 
as prepared by the architects, and as I believed applicable to the bulk sum of his contract, 
he said he would agree to that if it did not apply to extra work. I do not remember what 
I said in reply, but the Commissioner was informed of it, and the arrangement about it 
was made by the Commissioner himself and Mr. McGreevy. A draft contract was pre- 
pared under the directions of the Commissioner, by a clerk who usually does it. 

It was in the form the contracts of the Department usually are. This was submitted 
to His Excellency for approval on the 2nd December. The Commissioner submitted that 
he had the honour to submit for His Excellency's approval, a draft of the contract propos- 
ed to be entered into with Mr. Thomas McGreevy, Master Builder, Quebec, for the 
erection of the Parliamentary and Departmental Buildings at Ottawa, in accordance with 
the order in Council of the 23rd of the last month. 

In connection with this contract, the Commissioner begged to add, that he had receiv- 
ed a communication from Mr. McGreevy, the day before, which he transmitted with his 
report, in which he, Mr. McGreevy proposed to relinquish the Departmental Buildings to 
Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., Contractors, Port Hope. The Commissioner saw no objec- 
tion to the proposed division of the work, provided the aggregate of the two contracts so 
divided did not exceed the gross amount of Mr. McGreevy's tender, with the estimate for 
fire-proofing added. That is to say the sum of $627,310 for the whole work. This report 
was followed by the order in Council of date the 5th December, 1859. (See Blue Book, 
page 32.) In accordance with the division of the works between Mr. McGreevy and 
Messrs. Jcnes, Haycock & Co., two contracts were prepared by the law Officers of the 
Crown, and submitted by the Commissioner to the Executive Council, requiring instruc- 
tion for the execution of it. The order in Council of the 5th December, 1859, authorized 
the division of the contract as it now is. I say that I understood from the Commissioner, 
that the schedule thereto was attached to it, but was not to apply to the extra and addi- 
tional work. 

11 



82 



.Mr. Kcefer is asked why it was that the prices mentioned in the schedule attached to 
the contract were not to apply to extra and additional work. Upon this question being 
asked, Mr. Kcefer submitted whether he ought to disclose his knowledge of it, derived 
from his superior officer in the Department, till he can communicate with him. The Com- 
missioners said that if it were a matter of knowledge which transpired in the Executive 
Council, it was his duty not to disclose it, but if it were a kuowledge lie derived in 
transacting the public business of the Department with his superior officer, the Commis- 
sioners know of no rule of law or public expediency, which would justify his withholding 
it, but as Mr. Keefer desired to have time to consult with the late head of the Department, 
it was allowed, and the enquiry waived for the present. 

I understood that Messrs Jones, Haycock & Co., stood precisely as Mr. McGreevy 
did, in respect of the schedule attached to their contract, and had all his rights, and no 
more. In the first estimate in which extra work appeared on the Parliament Buildings 
for March, I860, I noted on the margin of the estimate that the schedules of prices did 
not govern the extra work. On the March estimate for the Departmental Buildings Mr. 
Kubidge wrote on the Margin : " No schedule prices given, the rates being determined 
" by local judgment and experience of the resident architects and clerks of works, and are 
" taken to be fair and just." 

I signed the estimates for the Parliament Buildings for the month of January, 
February, March, April, June and July. The estimates for May, August, September, 
October and November, are signed by Mr. llubidge, and I signed the estimates for the 
Departmental buildings for the months of January, February, March, April, May, June, 
July, August, September and October ; November is signed by the architects and clerks 
of works only. My signature was intended to certify to the Commissioner that they were 
correct, and in accordance with the contract. This is for the satisfaction of the Commis- 
sioner. When estimates come in they are opened by the Secretary and brought by him to 
the Commissioner and me, and they are then referred to Mr. Kubidge to be examined, to 
see that they arc in accordance with the contracts and prices. His signature without 
remark shows they are all right, if anything wrong it is marked on its proper place in the 
estimate. It is then returned to the Commissioner and me, and I examine it. All that 
are signed by me I examined. Those that are not signed, I did not examine. 

Upon the estimate upon the Departmental buildings for May, 1860, I noted — u the 
11 prices for cut stone per foot in items 1, 2, 8. appear to me excessive, deduct half." 
This was not final, but left for consideration, and a correspondence with the architects took 
place about it. .1 do not remember hearing anything more of the schedules till the 4th 
June, 1860. Mr. McGreevy called at theoffice with Mr. Jones, Mr. Powell, M.P.P., of 
Ottawa, and Mr. Burton, M.P.P., of Port Hope, for the purpose of obtaining a revision of 
the schedule of prices. 

Mr. McGreevy claimed that the progress estimates should be made on the schedule he 
first put in. The Commissioner said he would refer the matter to the architects, and they 
were telegraphed to come down immediately, and they came. No alteration was made but 
a correspondence ensued, and the architects declined to interfere in altering the prices in 
the schedule. I refer to the letter of the Department of the 12th June, 1860. All the 
extra work from the first was returned at prices above the schedule rates. The Depart- 
ment of Public Works contemplated a system of heating and ventilating, and there were 
flues and chimneys in the contract plans, but no system had then been matured for the 
purpose. The best mode of heating and ventilating was not then a settled point, and there 
was not time to mature a plan so as to have it incorporated in the plan for intending 
tenderers. 

The ninth clause of the contract contemplated such a system, but the Department did 
not construe that clause, as entitling the government to make more flues, or alter those 
marked on the plan, as part of the contract work, although in strictness it might have 
been. As the event has turned out, it would have been prudent to have had the heating 
and ventilating in the plan. I did not think so then, and I was pressed to go on with the 
work in the fall of 1859. If this system had been at first incorporated with the plans, 
and if test pits had been sunk, and everything done which could have been done, the 
work could not have been proceeded with till some time in the summer of 1860. 



83 



If we had waited to adjust the heating and ventilating to these buildings, we eould 
not in my opinion have commenced the work in 1859. The excavation could have been 
begun before the plans for heating and ventilating had been matured, but not the build- 
ing. On the 28th January, 1860, Messrs. Fuller and Joues, and Messrs. Stent and Laver 
were informed of the acceptance of Mr. Garth's tender, with modifications, and that Mr. 
Garth was to proceed to take his plans to Ottawa, to be matured under their direction. 
No part of the buildiug, in reference to Mr. Garth's plan, could go on until his plan 
was modified, and adapted to the buildings, but the excavations were proceeded with as 
soon as the plans were received. 

On the 11 tli April, 1860, I was in Ottawa, and met all the architects and Mr. Morris, 
to consider and examine Garth's plans. We examined them three hours. His plans met 
with general approval, and I left Mr. Garth in the architect's hands to correct some details 
observed in our examination. T thought his plan was very complete, it had been to a cer- 
tain extent adapted to the buildings, but there were certain defects to be remedied. 
Garth's specifications remained in the architects' hands till November, and his contract 
was not signed till the 12th January, 1861. 



5th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Shear©, Victor, Bourgkau. 

Samuel Keeper, further examined : 

When the tenders for the heating and ventilating were received in Quebec, Mr. 
Fuller was there, and was requested to report upon them. On his report I made mine. 
His report is dated the 23rd January, and published Blue Book, pa^e 128. Upon this, 
I, on the same day, made my report, confirming and recommending his. My report is 
published in the Blue Book, page 142. The only difference was, he was in favor of a fan, 
I was not. 

The Commissioner reported on this matter to Council on the 26th January. Refer- 
ence is made to this in the Blue Book, page 144. Upon this the order in Council was 
passed the 28th January, accepting Garth's tender, with such modifications as had been 
suggested by the architects and Deputy Commissioner. Immediately all the architects 
were informed of this, as I before stated. 

On the 9th February 1860, Messrs. Fuller & Jones informed the Department that 
they had arranged with Mr. Garth, the various details respecting the warming and venti- 
lating the Parliamentary building. I refer to this letter in Blue Book, page 162. The 
next step in the matter was in April at the meeting with the architects and Mr. Morris, of 
which I have spoken. On the 23rd August, 1860, letters were addressed from the De- 
partment, to Messrs. Fuller & Joues, and Messrs. Stent & Laver, informing them that all 
the plans furnished by Mr. Chas. Garth, fo; the heating and ventilating of the Parliament 
buildings at Ottawa, had been that day forwarded by express to their address, in order 
that thc}^ might have copies of them made for their own use during the progress of the 
works, and desiring them to send back the originals to be attached to the contract in the 
office of the Department of Public Works. Ou the 16th October, 1860, letters were 
addressed from the Department to Messrs. Fuller & Jones, and Messrs. Stent & Laver, 
requesting a meeting at Quebec, for the purpose of agreeing upon, and drawing up specifi- 
cations for the contract for heating and ventilating, in accordance with the plan agreed 



84 



upon, and the tender and conditions approved by the order in Council. (See letter Blue 
Book, page 163.) 

No meeting took place then, but on the 6th and 7th November 1860, I met the ar- 
chitects at Ottawa. We discussed and approved the specifications for heating and 
ventilating, and they were signed by the architects. I took these with me, and on the 8th 
reported upon them to the Commissioner, and I sent down documents connected with 
Garth's contract to have it made out. The contract was in the meantime prepared and 
was signed on the 12th January 1861. I was with the Commissioner at Ottawa when the 
ground was broken on the 20th December 1859. On the 11th April 1860, I was at 
Ottawa, and saw the works on that day. On the 21st June 1860, £ was at Ottawa to 
inspect the Prescott and Ottawa Railway, and on that day I visited the works. The eas- 
tern Departmental building was all up to the basement floor, and about half the basement 
walls laid in the Parliament building. The model of the Library was then nearly finished. 
I was next at Ottawa on the 10th August, and again at the laying of the foundation stone 
on the 1st September, but I came two da}^s before to see that the arrangements had been 
completed. I made no inspection of the works then. 1 was again at Ottawa on the 6th 
and 7th November, I went over the works then with the Honble Mr. Sherwood and the 
architects. On the 6th I was with Messrs. Fuller and Jones examining the estimate of 
October, which had been delayed at the instance of Mr. 31cGreevy that he might include 
in it his iron-girders. While I was there on that occasion, Messrs. Jones Haycock k Co., 
complained of delay in getting their plans. I had a meeting with them and the architects 
on that subject. The contractors wanted detailed plans of all the works at once, to enable 
them to cut stone during the winter. 

The architects said on the other hand the} r had plans enough to go on with, and after 
some demur on the part of the architects, they agreed to supply all that was necessary. 
The view I took was that they ought to have plans enough to carry them through the 
winter, but I thought them unreasonable in desiring them all at once. These were all my 
visits of that year. I cannot remember the state of the excavation of the drains and 
ducts on my visit to the works in April 1860. I do not remember when these excavations 
were commenced. I have no knowledge of the authority for doing these excavations outside 
the building. For all that was done in sinking the foundation down to the rock, for foun- 
dations, ducts and drains, under and in the buildings, there was the authority of the 
Department. I was not, nor am I now aware that there was excavation of solid rock over 
any considerable area of the building. I saw a portion of loose rock at two feet deep, 
between the building and the Library, but I gave no directions to the architects. They 
were there for that purpose. I was net aware of any rock to be removed except for the 
foundations of the walls, and only loose rock, T do not remember, and I have no memoranda 
of what rock had been removed from the Library at my first visit in April. 

I have no remembrance of seeing what work had theu been done in the ducts and 
drains outside the building, but something must have been done, for [ see it in the 
estimate. 1 must have noticed the works in June, but I do not remember what impression 
they made on my mind. 

In November, the excavations were far advanced, and attracted my notice. 1 
thought there was going to be an immense amount of unauthorized extra work. I then 
saw the character of the work in the drains, but I do not remember about the ducts. 
There was no estimate called for by, or supplied to the Department connected with 
the preparation of the buildings for the dusts, drains, boiler house, or flues for Mr. (larth's 
contract. I considered it almost impossible to make an estimate of the alterations, and 
works iuside the buildings, and I did not then contemplate ruuning the ducts more than 
outside the walls of the buildings, because no plans were ever made and matured showing 
where they would terminate. And as no plans or estimate had been prepared, no 
authority could be given for doing the work, and no authority for doing it was given. 

The Architects were definitely instructed to do no extra work without the written 
instructions of the Commissioner. If any extra work was done, it rested with them to 
get that written order, and whatever work was done without that written order, was done 
on their own responsibility. The only written orders which the Department gave or 



85 



sanctioned, have been laid before the commission. I now refer to the first order given 
by the Department to Messrs. Stent and Laver, dated 10th December, 1859, and to the 
first order given to Messrs. Fuller and Jones, dated 12th December, 1859, containing also 
their instructions. (See Blue Book, pages 131 to 135.) 

I next refer to the letters of the Department to the respective architects, dated the 
28th January, 1860, referring to Garth's contract. The one referring to Messrs. Fuller 
and Jones is in these words : 

u I am directed by the Honorable the Commissioner to inform you that he has 
accepted the tender of Mr. Charles Garth, of Montreal, for the heating aud ventilating of 
the Parliamentary and Departmental Buildings at Ottawa, on the steam and vault system, 
according to his plans and specifications, and to the printed conditions submitted for com- 
petition, with certain modifications, mentioned in Mr. Fuller's report, and subject to such 
other modifications as upon the maturing of the plans, may meet the approval of the 
Commissioner. 

" The modifications referred to by Mr. Fuller are, — First, the working of the boilers? 
at a higher pressure than 10 lbs to the square inch. Second, confining the vault system 
in the Parliamentary Buildings to the Library and central part, and applying steam 
radiators, joined with an approved system of ventilation, to the wings. Third, that if upon 
further investigation it be found necessary for insuring success in the ventilation of the 
Parliamentary Buildings that a fan be used, it shall be provided by the contractor for 
that purpose, and an efficient engine to propel it. 

" The contractor has been instructed to put himself in communication with you, and 
will take up his plans to be matured under your directions. Specifications to be prepared 
and everything to be arranged between you and the contractor, subject to the approval 
of the Commissioner, in order that a contract may be entered into with this Department, 
which shall embrace the whole system of warming and ventilating, in as complete a 
manner as it is possible for you to devise, and these plans and specifications shall not add 
anything to the amount of the tender, which is sixty one thousand two hundred and eighty 
five dollars for the whole/' 

And the one referring to Messrs Stent & Laver is in these words : 

" I am directed by the Honorable the Commissioner to inform you that he has 
accepted the tender of Mr. Charles Garth, of Montreal, for the heating and ventilating 
of the Parliamentary and Departmental Buildings, Ottawa, on the steam and vault sys- 
tem, according to his plans and specifications, and to the printed conditions submitted for 
competition, with certain modifications mentioned in Mr. Fuller's report, and subject to 
such other modifications as, upon the maturing of the plans, may meet the approval of 
the Commissioner. 

u The modification referred to by Mr. Fuller, is the working of the boilers at a higher 
pressure than ten pounds to the square inch. 

" The contractor has been instructed to put himself in communication with you, and 
will take up his plans to be matured under your direction. Specifications are to be pre- 
pared, and everything arranged between you and the contractor, subject to the approval 
of the Commissioner, in order that a contract can be entered into with this Department 
which shall embrace the whole system of warming and ventilating, in as complete a man- 
ner as it is possible for you to devise. These plans and specifications shall not add any- 
thing to the amount of the tender, which is sixty-one thousand two hundred and eighty- 
five dollars for the whole." 

The next order given is that of Messrs. Fuller & Jones, dated 14th February, 1860, 
but transmitted by the Department to Mr. Morris on the 22nd February; signed by John 
Morris, clerk of Works, approved and signed by the Hon. Mr. Hose, the Commissioner, 
and countersigned by me in these words : — 

" You are hereby requested to excavate the grouud for the various foundations, down 
to the surface of the rock, and also the whole area of the central court, and all the trenches 
requisite for the cold air ducts in connection with the warming apparatus, and leave open- 
ings for doors in the basement walls of the rooms iu the front part of the building, so a$ 



86 



to give access and fit them for future use, should they be required, giving them light also 
from without, and fire-places within, as shown in the working drawings." 

The next letter is from the Department, dated the 1st February. 1860, to the respec- 
tive architects, in these words : 

a I am directed by the Hon. the Commissioner to inform you that the block plan 
showing the sites of the Parliamentary and Departmental Buildings, and their respective 
levels, was submitted to and approved of by the Executive Council, and that you are to 
arrange the levels of the buildings as thereupon represented. 

" The clerk of works, Mr. Morris, has been notified to the effect that, you are to have 
free use of the drawing which is in his possession ." 

I know nothing farther about the Nepeau stone than appears in the correspondence 
published in the blue book, excepting that when I was here in December, 1859, I saw 
some nice looking stone lying about the ground on the Barrack Hill, said to have been 
brought in as specimens of stone in the neighborhood. It was the kind of stone we wished 
to use, and which Mr. Morris had not found except at a distance out of reach. On en- 
quiry it was found to have come from a quarry of Mr. Augustus Keefer, about 10 or 1 1 miles 
distant; as soon as it was examined it met with general approval, and Messrs. Fuller & Jones 
and Messrs. Stent & Laver suggested its use. The letter of the 15th February, I860, was 
addressed by the Department to Mr. Morris on the subject ; I refer to it, and to the report 
of Mr. Morris, dated the 22ad February, 1860. (See Blue Book, page 259.) There 
ought to have been no dispute about the substitution of it for Ottawa stone in the building. 

When the competing designs were inspected, the coutents of the buildings were cubed 
and a rough estimate of their cost obtained in this manner. The cubic contents of the 
buildings from ground to roof are taken, and allowing 6d. a cubic foot, which I understand 
was the actual cost of the University of Toronto, I found they were all within the estimate 
in this rough way, except the Parliament Building, which T estimated at £90,000. I learnt 
afterwards, from Mr. Morris, that the University cost 7Jd. a foot, but I did not know this 
at the time. When the contract plans were preparing, I felt afraid th:\t when we came to 
carry the designs out, good bona fide tenders would show they woali cost nore than had 
been allowed, and in order to keep within the sum mentioned in the notice the plans were 
drawn as cheaply as possible. Wooden floors were put in, and several things which I do 
not now remember, to make them as cheap as possible and keep within the limits. I feared 
all along it was impracticable, but considered they were Government works, built by Gov- 
ernment, and that whatever wc did build should be done wcl\ and not be condemned 
afterwards as mean, or unworthy ; and, anticipating the decision of the Government with 
respect to the fire-proofing, it was included in the notice. 

The Department did not call on the architects officially to take out quantities, but 
they furnished me with an estimate when I reported on the tenders. I did not test the 
accuracy of their estimate. I thought the tenders would be the best test. I thought it 
might be done for their estimate. I objected to the architects taking out quantities to 
dispose of to intending tenderers, lest the Department should be committed to these 
quantities. There was an estimate by trades of the Parliament Buildings and also of the 
Departmental Buildings. 

These were the data of my bulk sum report. 1 never supposed the appropriation 
would complete the buildings for this reason:- — Before I came into this office, the Assistant 
Engineer and Architect of the Department had furnished an estimate giveu on page 8, of 
the Blue Book stating, that to complete the buildings, would cost £285,656 8s lid, and 
the appropriation of £225,000 being less than this, and as I never yet knew an architect 
or engineer's estimate but was exceeded in the actual construction of the work, 1 therefore 
concluded that the appropriation was only so much towards the buildings. The plan 
showing the levels of Barrack Hill, was made between my visit here on the 21st May, 
1859, and the 6th June. 1 instructed Mr. Slater to make a survey of Barrack Hill, and 
give the levels. 

He did so, and on 6th June, 1859, sent the plan to the office. It was taken for the 
purpose of sending to the architects, and my impression is that it was sent. I cannot 



87 



now tell why the actual ground line was not marked on the plans for teuder, instead of the 
assumed. The plans were prepared by separate architects, who did not know where the 
respective buildings, would exactly be placed. They did not know the respective levels of 
the buildings, nor how far they would be apart, or how placed in reference to each other 
therefore the actual line was not adopted. It did not occur to me at the time,* that it was 
of much importance to show on the contract plans the actual ground line of where the 
buildings wen: to bo placed, and the locations of them were not made in consequence, till 
after the tenders were accepted. I look at the progress estimate for the Parliamentary 
Buildings for the month of March, I860. T find contract work amount to 81,217.95, and 
extra work to $4,375.95. 

The chief sums are for rock and earth excavation ; of this, rock exeavation in the 
main drain was $1,861.80. It is on this estimate my memorandum is made. " The 
schedule of prices does not govern extra work." My authority for making this was my 
knowledge that, whatever the contract said, the arrangement with Mr. McGreevy before it 
was signed was, that the schedule of prices should not apply to extra, and additional 
work. The Commissioner was as well aware of this as myself. It was not my duty to 
report that 1 found the schedule did apply to extra work, for the Commissioner himself 
knew it already. I considered this was the arrangement Mr. McGreevy had made with 
the Commissioner, and I but carried it out. If Mr. McGreevy had not tendered too low 
in the competition to get the contract, there would have been no need of this arrangement. 
As it was in the schedule, the more wor^k he got the more ruinous it would have been te 
him. Mr. McGreevy never gave a schedule of prices to the satisfaction of the Depart- 
ment, in compliance with the conditions of the order in Council which authorized the 
acceptance of his tender. I told the Commissioner the schedule he gave was not satis- 
factory, and after the department prepared the one which is now attached to the contract, 
McGreefy said he would not have it applied to extra work, and the Commissioner agreed 
it should not so apply, before the contract was signed. 

1 again refer to the objections of Mr. McGreevy' s adviser, and this was my reason for 
not applying it to extra and additional work ; and I thought until I saw the contract, that 
it had been drawn in accordance with the agreement. I did not think it my duty to re- 
monstrate against what my superior officer had done in this matter. The next estimate 
I look at is that for April. The whole contract work amounts to $2,158.80 ; the whole 
extra to $9,408.75 for this month, of which $2,968 40 is for rock excavation in drains, 
§3,046.30 for reck excavation simply ; earth excavation $774. There are in this estimate 
781 days' work amounting to $988.30. This extra work was passed without applying the 
schedule prices for the same reason. The estimate far May I did not examine myself. 
The next one I refer to is for June i860. The whole contract work is $16,170. Extra 
work $20,796.38, of this there is of earth excavation $343.16, rock excavation, and in 
drains $2,677.05, rubble masonry in foundations $9,336, labour on pick faced masonry in 
boiler house and cold air ducts $5,001.21. Pick faced stone for drains $875. 

The next estimate I refer to is for July 1860. Contract work is $7,342.17. Extra 
work $25,230.95. Of this there was for earth excavation $853.26. Ptock excavation and 
in drains $1,368. Rubble masonry in foundations $16,656. Picked arches for cold air 
ducts, picked faced stone for same, and pick faced prepared for drains $5,204.94. 

The estimates -for the months of August, September, October and November, I did 
not examine. 

Looking at the estimate for the Parliament building for May, which I did not exa- 
mine or sign, the whole contract work is $1,730.00. Extra work $15,863.94 of which 
there is for earth $459.00. Kock $695.00. ' Hubble masonry iu foundations $8,200.00. 
Labour on pick face of boiler house, and cold air ducts $3,802.34. Circular wall of library 
faced stone prepared and steps for boiler house' $1,144.00. Time bills and sundries 
$1,563.40. 

The estimates for August and September I did not examine or sign. The contract 
work is $41,864.00. Extra work $33,348.61; of this extra work there is for earth work 
$83.70, rock excavation $2,282.00. Hock excavation in drains and ducts $2,458.00, 
Rubble masonry in foundations $14,760,00, Stone prepared for boiler house, air ducts. 



88 



and drains $5,919.24. Nepean sand stone prepared $1,706.38, for Ohio stone 81,080.00. 
For Ohio and Brockville stone $1,043.15. Filling to wall $708.90. Sundries $118.80. 
Arnprior marble $262.50. Centering and materials $936.35. Days' labour $1,288.00. 

The estimates for October and November, I did not examine or sign. In this there 
was contract work, $5,360.80. Extra work, $14,952.40 of which there was earth excava- 
tion $17.40. Rock excavation in drains and ducts $683.35. Pick faced masonry in boiler 
house and cold air ducts and drains, $5,072.24. Nepean facing above limestone, $704.97. 
Ohio stone deliveied, $678.00. Filling to wall, $1,672.80. Days' work $1,836.05. 

The estimates for the Parliament buildings are marked No. 5. A, B, 0, D, E, F, G, 
H, I, K, L. 

Those I now look at are the estimates for the Departmental buildings No. 5, a, b, c, 
d, e, f, g, h, i, k, 1. 

In the estimate for January, I860, the contract work is $2,505.52. No extra. 

In the estimate for February, contract work is $4,316.80. No extra. 

In the estimate for March, contract work is $4,256.59. Extra, $7,223.65. Hock 
excavation, $1,506.37. In drains, $5,628 50. It is on this estimate Mr. Rubidge made 
the memorandum, in these words. " No schedule prices given, the rates being determined 
" by the local judgment and experience of the resident architects and clerk of works, 
" and are taken to be fair and just." 

When I signed this estimate, I saw the words and understood them to mean that the 
schedule prices attached to the contract were not to be applied to extra work on these 
buildings, according to the arrangement made between the Commissioner and Mr. Mc- 
Greevy, before his contract was signed, and as Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., stepped 
into his place, the same arrangement was to be applied to them. I made no report of this, 
and took no official notice of it, as it was known to the Commissioner, and was but carry- 
ing out his arrangement, and the extra work on all the estimates, was allowed on the same 
principle as on this. 

In the estimate for April, the contract work is $947.93. Extra, $5,396.45 of which 
there is of earth excavation, $324.00. Rock excavation, $1,512.35. Rubble masonry in 
lime mortar, $2,552.00. Extra labour on face of boiler house, $711.10. Cutting stone, 
and covering treuch, $397.00. 

In the principal estimate for May, the contract work is $6,076.97. Extra work $20,- 
756.19 of which there is for earth, $3.30. Rock excavation, $12,267.95. Rubble mason- 
ry, $6,368.00. Extra labour on boiler house and shaft, $1,896.00. Days' work, $292.54. 
In the supplementary estimate for May, there is no contract work, but extra work is 
$14,340.56 of which, earth excavation called clay, is $2,477.40. Hard pan, $4,086.00. 
Rock excavation, $4,272.60. Extra labour in faced work of smoke arches in boiler house, 
and cold air ducts, &c, $1,24C31. Cut stone prepared for cold air ducts, $2,264.25. I 
made a remark which is written on this estimate which is not examined by Mr. Rubidge. 
" The prices per foot for cut stone, in items 1, 2, 3, appear to me excessive, deduct half." 
The first item, rock excavation below ten feet, is returned at $5 per cubic yard. No. 2, 
extra labour in arches of cold air ducts, at $2.50 per foot, is allowed, superficial. No. 3, 
cut stone prepared for invert arches of drains, $1,90 a foot ; at that time half was only al- 
lowed, making a deduction of $1,076.00 from the account, but a correspondence ensued. 
I refer to the letters of the Department dated 26th June, 1860, No. 32,709, (Exhibit No. 
32,) and the 11th July, 1860, No. 32,922 (Exhibit No. 33,) and the replies (Exhibits Nos. 
34 and 35.) 

In the estimate for June, there is of contract work, $6,082.01. Extra work, $30,- 
595.26 of which earth excavation is $4,282.00. Rock excavation, $12,665.70 Rubble 
stone masonry, $10,080.00. Days' labour $526.46. When I signed it, I referred to letter 
of architects of the 14th July, (Exhibit No. 34,) and to which I now refer. 

In the estimate for July there is of contract work, $23,044 80. Extra work, $13,904.05 
of which there is of earth excavation, $628.30. Rock excavation, $8,132.55. Rubble 
stone masonry, $1,376.00. Excavation in boiler house and cold air ducts, $2,554.15. 



89 



Nepean stone facing, $498.96. Cut stone prepared for boiler house, and cold air ducts, 
$4,465.65. Days' labour, $532.70. In the estimates for August, and September, together, 
there is of contract work, $8,473.98. Extra, $27,430.07 of which there is earth for spoil 
bank, $533.50. Rock excavation, $21,367.55. Hubble stone masonry, $9,264.00. Rock 
excavation in boiler house, and cold air ducts, &c, $2,770.00. Bricks laid in mortar, 
$1,587.83. Nepean stone facing, $3,011.61. Cut stone prepared for boiler house and cold 
air ducts $2,445.75. 



6th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman. 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Samuel Keeper, further examined: 

In the estimate for October there is of contract work, $16,663.74. Extra $26,373.72 
of this there was of rock excavation in eastern block, $5,638.45. In the Western one 
$9,986.50. Extra labour in Boiler House, $2,583.00 j brick in mortar, $2,156.97 j Nepean 
stone facing, $1,983.87 ; arches and sides of drains, $1,556.00. Nepean sandstone deliver- 
ed $1,712.55. 

In the estimate for November, which I did not examine or sign, there is of contract 
work, $1,506.50; extra work, $12,002.48, of which, for earth excavation, there is $98.15; 
rock excavation, $6,001.45 ; rubble masonry, $856.00; extra labour on cold air ducts, 
$407.00 ; brick laid in mortar, $550.12 ; Nepean sand stone facing, $407.68 ; cut stone 
prepared for cold air ducts, $321.00; centreing, $463.20; arches and inverts stones built 
in drains, $2,205.00. I look at the items of the time bills from month to month, and say 
it was not my duty to check these, but the duty of Mr. Rubidge. I saw the amounts 
were large, but objected to it from time to time, but it was continued until the amount was 
large, and then Mr. Page was sent to inquire into it. I suppose Mr. Page would go over 
these details, and, if not found right, would reject them. These extra works were not or- 
dered, and no remonstrance was made at the time, because it was supposed the architects 
were on the spot to do what was right and just towards the Contractors and the Govern- 
ment, and I had, at that time, confidence in them that they would do it. 

(Signed,) Samuel Keefer. 



William Coverdale, Sworn : 

I am an architect, and live in Kingston. I have followed the profession twenty 
years, and have lived in Kingston thirty years. I have been engaged in a 
great variety of works there. I am acquainted with the modes of measurement 
in Kingston, and the value of work there. My knowledge of the modes of measure- 
ment and values is local. I speak of Kingston only. There is a similarity in the 
limestone of Ottawa and Kingston. The stone in Ottawa is rougher, and not so easily 
worked. In pick dressing, the stone in Ottawa as compared with Kingston stone, 20 per 
cent would be the difference. Cut stone is measured on the face only, beds and joints 
are never measured. A toise of stone from the quarry is 216 cubic feet, piled in the 
12 



90 



rou^h. A toise of rubble masonry is 72 cubic feet. We measure 36 feet superficial on a 
wall of two feet, which is the standard. All under two feet is measured as two feet, if the 
wall exceeds two feet, its cubic contents are taken and divided by 72, as the toise. No 
deductions are made for openings in rubble masonry. We measure brick by the thousand, 
and always deduct openings ; we allow 16 bricks to the cubic foot, but the mode in King- 
ston is not to measure brick work by the cubic foot. We take the superficies of the wall, 
and if the wall is half brick, allow six bricks, if one brick thick twelve bricks, if one and a 
half brick, eighteen bricks to the foot superficial of the wall. All thicknesses over that 
are reduced to the standard of thirteen inches, and eighteen bricks allowed as the foot of 
a thirteen inch wall, which makes about sixteen bricks to the cubic foot. 

The toise of quarry stone delivered at the buildings is $2,50 to $3 a toise of 216 feet. 
Masous' wages are $1,50 a day ; labourers' 75 to 80 cents. We allow a dollar a toise for 
mortar ; lime is 10 to 12i cents per bushel. Sand is 3 cents per bushel. Bricklayers' 
wages $1,50 a day. 

Such work as I see in the boiler house here, in Kingston would be worth 12 J cents 
per foot ; the work in the ducts 10 cents per foot, measured on the face only. Arches are 
measured on the soffit on what is seen in the wall, with other work. In the basement 
stories, rubble work is worth $4 a toise of 72 feet in the wall. In upper stories the aver- 
age is $5 per toise. A toise of 54 feet would just be worth on«-fot rth less than these 
prices, but we never measure by the 54 feet toise in Kingston. Bricks, for the last three 
years, have averaged $7 a thousand delivered. Brick in the walls averages $12 a thousand, 
which includes mortar, labour, and scaffolding. All these prices embrace a builder's 
profit of 20 per cent. The actual prime cost of the work is 20 per cent lower than I have 
stated it. We measure flues as solid, as an equivalent for plastering them inside. Our 
flues do not average over a foot square. Excavation in drains three to four feet wide and 
five to six feet deep is 60 cents per cubic yard. 

If the excavations were wider, say from 12 to 15 feet, and 10 feet at bottom 50 cents 
a cubic yard. We have no deep excavation except in wells, and then we add 50 cents per 
yard extra for every five feet down. If the excavation was wide enough to admit of being 
drawn out, 25 cents per yard extra for every five feet. If the stone had to be lifted out, 
50 cents extra for every five feet in depth. Earth excavation to 6 feet, 20 cents per 
cubic yard ; our rock does not usually lie deeper. Earth from spoil banks and ramming, 
I should say, the same as excavation, 20 cents a yard. 

In excavating rock for a house, if the rock is given to those who do the work, it is 
equivalent to the labor of excavating, and nothing is charged. A builder considers it 
an advantage to quarry on the site, it saves drawing. I never knew an instance of rock 
from excavation being allowed as stone delivered. If the excavation is paid for by the 
proprietor, the stone excavated is his, not the property of the excavator. I never knew of 
stone measured by any other toise than 216 feet. In measuring circular cut stone work, 
if the curve is flat, we allow 50 per cent; if a quick curve, 75 to 100 per cent, over plain 
work. 

(Signed) William Coverdale. 



v ■'• ■■— r-r— — 



91 



8th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. ©., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau, 

James Baine, sworn. 

I am Book-keeper in the Department of Public Works. Part of my duty is to pre- 
pare certificates for warrants to be issued, authorizing payments to parties entitled to it for 
work done to the government through the Department. In regard to these public build- 
ings, the regular course was for the year i860, to make progress estimates from month to 
month of work done, and materials provided, as the work proceeded. 

These estimates were at first signed by the architects of the respective buildings, and 
the clerk of works. When received at the office they were registered and laid before the 
Commissioner, who referred them to the Assistant Engineer, and architect, or the Deputy 
Commissioner, whose duty was, as I understand it, to see that the works were authorized, 
and the prices properly rated. The Assistant Engineer or Deputy Commissioner signed 
them as vouching for their correctness so far. They then passed to the Secretary, whose 
duty it was to lay them before the Deputy Commissioner, who examined an! approved of 
them, and laid them before the Commissioner. If the Deputy was absent they went direct 
to the Commissioner, who endorsed them as authorizing the certificate to issue. If the 
Commissioner was absent, the Deputy endorsed them for the same purpose. They were 
then in charge of the Secretary who sent them to me, and I prepared the certificate for the 
warrants upon them, keeping the estimates as the vouchers of the Department. After I 
had prepared the certificates for the warrants, the Secretary put his initials to them, and 
also in the margin of the book containing an abstract of them. 

The certificates were then taken by me to the Commissioner to sign them, or in his 
absence, to the Deputy Commissioner. The certificates when signed, were given by me to 
Mr. Harper, who sent them to the Minister of Finance, and the Secretary, in writing, 
informed the party in whose favour they were issued, that they had been issued. The 
party entitled to payment goes to the Receiver General, who pays the money. In the 
year 1861, the estimates were not certified in the same way. Why the change was made, 
I do not know. All the estimates I got for the Parliament Buildings from the com- 
mencement of the work until, and including August, 1861, I placed to the credit of 
Thomas McGreevy. On the 11th September, 1861, I was ordered verbally to prepare a 
certificate in favour of Thomas McGreevy for $40,000. On the 8th October, I was ordered 
to prepare another certificate in his favour for $40,000. On the 19th October another in 
his favour for $10,000, and the 20th November, I was ordered to prepare another certifi- 
cate in his favour for $45,000. All these certificates which I was verbally ordered to pre- 
pare, were signed by the Hon. Mr. Cauchon. 

I had no estimates or accounts to authorize the issuing of them. I charged Mc- 
Greevy with these sums, and credited him with the balance, charging it to a suspense 
account. This account is debited with this balance, and credited to Mr. McGreevy, and 
now stands so in the books of the Department. I made the entry in this way, as the most 
convenient for reference. The suspense account was also charged with the balance of the 
amount advanced to Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co. 

The suspense account embraced the two amounts advanced to the respective contrac- 
tors. There was no explanation given to me why these certificates were issued. I put in 
now a true copy of the account between Mr. McGreevy and the Government, in referenee 
to the Parliament buildings, it is marked exhibit No. 36. He is charged with all the 
certificates jssued ; and credited with all the progress estimates, and the balance against 



92 



him is $140,290.68 for which there is no voucher so far as I know. The estimates for 
the Departmental buildings were made out in a way similar to those of Mr. McGreevy, for 
the year 1860, and till August, 1861. 

AH these estimates from the beginning of the work, until and including August, 
1861, I credit to Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co. On the 11th September, 1861, I was ver- 
bally ordered to prepare a certificate in favour of Jones, Haycock & Co., for $23,700. On 
the 9th October I was ordered to prepare another certificate in their favour for $30,000. 
On the 28th October I was ordered to prepare another certificate in their favour for 
$10,000. On the 20th November another certificate in their favour for $45,000, and on 
the 13th May, 1862, I was ordered to prepare another estimate in their favour for $2,000. 

All these certificates, which I was verbally ordered to prepare, were signed by the 
Hon. Mr. Cauchon. I had no estimates or accounts to authorize the issuing of them. I 
put in a true copy of their account with the Government in reference to the Departmental 
buildings, (Exhibit No. 37.) There is a balance against them of $145,923. 

I had no estimates with which to credit Mr. McGreevy, and Messrs. Jones, Haycock 
& Co., for the amount advanced them by order of the Commissioner to enable me to close 
the general account current of the Department, with the Province for the Auditor General. 
I charged the balance to a suspense account for public buildings Ottawa, and credited Mr. 
McGreevy and Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., with the sums charged to it. The general 
account current thus showed the sums in suspense, and showed the Department that none 
of its officers had any money in hand. 

The order in Council of 19th November, authorizing $100,000 to be applied to the 
Parliament Buildings at Ottawa, had a memorandum on the back, with the initials of the 
Hon. Mr. Cauchon, to issue certificates to Mr. McGreevy for $45,000, and to Jones, Hay- 
cock & Co., for $45,000, but my impression is, I prepared the certificates on a verbal order. 
I rendered the Auditor the accounts current of the contractors, showing the sums in 
suspense. 

(Signed,) James Baine. 



James Dyson Slater, sworn : 

I am an Engineer, at present employed by the Department of Public Works as 
Superintendent of the Hideau Canal. I was desired by the Department in May, 1S59, to 
make a survey and take the levels of Barrack Hill, which I with the assistance of Mr. 
Boyle, of the Ottawa Survey, performed immediately, and returned a plan showing the 
shape of the ground, aud its levels at every 50 feet, as compared with the assumed low 
water of the Ottawa lliver, — a point 6.63 feet above the lower sill of the entrance lock of 
the Hideau Canal. The rock where the Library is built, is 158 feet above this. I see a 
tracing of my plan with the Buildings laid down upon it, marked H. 

If the sites of the buildings had been traced on the plan, or if I had been told how 
large the buildings were to be, and their distance from each other, I could easily in a week, 
have tested the depth of the rock, at any required point, so as to have shown the depths 
of the foundations. My plan showed the level on every point at 50 feet distances, over the 
whole ground. The area of the ground, exclusive of the steep slopes, is nearly 28 acres. 
The slopes are precipitous, except on Wellington Street, and a small portion of the south- 
west portion of the ground, on Bank Street. In the front of the Parliament Buildings, 
the original ground line was 5 feet lower at the east than at the west corner ; but tne 
centre was 6 feet higher than the west end, and 11 feet higher than the east end of this 
building. The south-east corner of the western Departmental Building, was 9 feet higher 
than the south-west corner of the eastern Departmental Building. The difference 
of the level of the east front of the western Departmental Building, was 8 feet. The 
north being the higher level. On the south front of the same building, the difference in 
the level was 4 feet, the east being the higher. The difference of the levels of the west 
front of the eastern Departmental Building, was 1 foot, the north being the higher. The 



93 



difference of the south front of the same building, was 1 foot, the east being the higher 
The difference of level between the south-west angle of the Parliament Building, and the 
north-east angle of the western Departmental Building, is 1 foot, the Parliament Building 
being the higher \ and between the north-east angle of the western Departmental 
Building, and the north-west angle of the eastern Departmental Building, is 17 feet ; the 
western being the higher. 

(Signed,) James Dyson Slater. 



Patrick McMahon Burns, sworn : 

I was employed by Mr. McGrreevy, as Superintendent of the works in the Parliament 
Buildings. I commenced on the 3rd April, 1860. When I began I was chief superin- 
tendent, and so continued until the end of May, or beginning of June, when Mr. 
Haughey succeeded me as chief superintendent. From the time I ceased to be superin- 
tendent, I acted as foreman over the buildings, till June, 1861. I was introduced by Mr. 
McG-reevy, as his superintendent, or foreman, and I was told to do as he ordered me. 
When I began, the excavation in the Library was out in the south-east corner, but not in 
any other part. The north-west side, rose at a slope of about 3 feet. On an average, I 
should think the excavation for the Library all round was 5 feet. I assisted in laying out 
the Library with Mr. Morris. I had charge of the rock excavation in the north-west part 
of the building, but I took no measurements. 

Mr. Morris directed the work. I am unable to speak of the depths of the rock foun- 
dations, for I took no measurements. I saw Mr. G-rist measuring the excavation, but I 
never saw Mr. McGrreevy or any one for him. I never laid out any of the walls. Mr. 
Morris laid out the front of the building, from east to west, and the centre line of the 
building, from the Main Tower to the Library. I began the mason-work of the Parlia- 
ment Buildings. None was done till I came, and I began with the Library. I built the 
north-east eighth part, I should say, of the foundation walls ; then the foundations of the 
ducts through the Library, and a part of the south-east, and south-west foundation. Then 
I began some time in May or June, to work in the Boiler House, which had been 
excavated. The drain had been excavated as far as opposite the west wing of the 
building, but how deep, I cannot say. The excavation was continued until it 
was completed, except for a short time. I built the boiler house, as high as 
the first flight of steps. I never measured the excavation for Mr. McGrreevy, 
nor saw it done. I never made any return to him of any measurement of exca- 
vation. I never laid out any wall, and I never had any plan. Mr. Morris gave 
me the main lines, west of the boiler house, and the lines where the piers are, in the 
Legislative Assembly lobby. I built them according to the lines given by Mr. Morris. 
Mr. Morris came with Mr. Haycock, and gave me the main lines in front of the building, 
and from the south-west front of the west tower, to the north-west angle of the building, 
Mr. Grrist gave me the walls of the court yard, in the west wing. When I was at a stand 
with my men, I would go to Mr. Haughy, he would say he did not know. I would then 
go and work on other walls, till Mr. Haughy gave me other lines, and I would com- 
mence on them, and see Mr. Grrist, who used to come and see what I was doing. He in- 
spects the work, and measured the walls, and if anything was wrong, he would go with me 
to where Mr. Haughy had plans. 

They would compare them, and see whether they were right. I spoke to Mr. Morris 
once about lines for a wall from the court, he said he had no right to give me lines, and 
I never asked for them again. When I left the boiler house, I worked on the front wall, 
east of the tower. Mr. Morris told me to thicken that 6 inches. I did it. I kept no 
memorandum of the thickness of any walls, all I remember is, that I did as I was di- 
rected by Mr. Morris. Mr. Haughy laid out some walls in the saloons. 1 cannot make 
eference to any walls Mr. Grrist directed me to lay out, but there are several he 
id direct me to lay out. I cannot call 'to mind any wall in particular, there are 
o many — but he did lay out some under the Legislative Assembly, and some in 



94 



the west wing. Mr. Haughy laid out a good number of the walls for me, but I would 
refer to Mr. Grist, who would direct a ten or twenty foot rod, to measure the openings, to 
see if the apartments were in their right places. He stopped me on four or five occasions 
to see that they were right. He would go to the east portion, which was finished, and 
measure them, and come back and make those on the west the same. I now refer to the 
walls in the saloons. I cannot call to mind any walls except those I have spoken of, Mr. 
Morris laid out. I cannot speak of the width of the excavation in front of the building, 
for I took no measurement of it. 



(Signed,) Patrick McMahon Burns. 



9th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph S heard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Hewitt Bernard, sworn. 

I am chief clerk in the Crown Law Department of Upper Canada, I have been so 
since May 1859. About the end of November 1859, I was instructed by the Department 
of Public Works, to prepare a contract between Her Majesty, and Thomas McGreevy, for 
the Parliamentary and Departmental buildings at Ottawa. I put in the memorandum for 
drawing the contract, which I received from the Department of Public Works, it is ex- 
hibit No. 38. Upon it I prepared a draft contract which I sent to the Department of 
Public Works, and about the 1st or 2nd December, I received it back with another mem- 
orandum from the Department, to prepare two separate contracts for the public buildings. 
I put it in, exhibit No. 39. In the instructions in the paper marked No. 39 this paragraph 
is contained. " The schedule of prices submitted to be taken on the understanding that 
if the total quantity of work calculated at these prices, exceeds the contract prices of 
$622,918, then these prices shall be reduced pro rata, for all the purposes for which they 
were required." After I had received the second memorandum I altered, and adapted the 
draft to the changed circumstances, and sent it again to the Department of Works. I 
understood at the time that the draft was submitted to Mr. McGreevy, and that his lawyer 
made certain objections. That the Commissioner of Public Works submitted the draft, 
and Mr. McGreevy's objections for the consideration of the Executive Council, that when 
before them, the law officers of the crown settled the draft, and an order in Council ap- 
proving of the draft so settled, was passed on the 7th December (Exhibit No. 40.) The 
objections of Mr. McGreevy I put in (Exhibit No. 41.) I had the contract as thus settled, 
engrossed for the Department of Public Works, and I examined the engrossment with the 
draft, and having attached the papers referred to in the contracts as being attached, sent 
then to the Department of Public Works, with a letter dated the 7th December, a copy 
of which I put in (Exhibit No. 42.) I suggested either to the Hon. Mr. Rose, or to Mr. 
Keefer, that I had better be present and see the contract executed, to see that the .papers 
were properly certified and witnessed, and I was present, and saw the contract for the 
Parliamentary building executed by the Commissioner, Mr. Rose, and by Mr. Thomas 
McGreevy, tie contractor. I am the subscribing witness to it. I attested the papers at- 
tached to it. I look the schedule of prices attached to it marked C. It is signed by 
Thomas McGreevy at top and bottom, and on the top is this memorandum made by me 
before he signed it. " Schedule C. referred to in he annexed indenture, and to be con- 



95 



strued and read as part thereof, and as embodied therein, and forming part of the said 
indenture/' I now look at the contract between Her Majesty the Queen, and Messrs. 
Jones, Haycock & Co., I say, I saw it executed by the Hon. Mr. Rose, and by Ralph Jones 
one of the contractors. I am the subscribing witness to the execution of the contracts by 
them only. I look at the schedule C. attached to it. It is the schedule of prices. I saw 
it signed by Mr. Jones, and before he signed it I had made the following memorandum 
upon it. " Schedule C. referred to in the annexed indenture, to be construed and read as 
part thereof, and as if embodied in the said indenture. There was no protest made by either 
Mr McGreevy or Mr. Jones, to the Schedule of prices attached to the respective contracts 
or anything said in objection to it, in my hearing, when the contracts were signed. I 
understood while the negociations were going on, there had been disputes about the prices 
with Mr. McGreevy, but I understood they had been all adjusted, when the contracts were 
signed. I had the printed form of contracts usually adopted by the Department of Public 
Works, and I had the conditions attached to the specifications, when I prepared the draft 
of the contract, and I embodied them in the draft, and struck out the conditions in the 
specification attached to the contract for the Departmental buildings, and I detached them 
from the specification, for the Parliament building, and so the respective specifications 
now appear. 



(Signed) H. Bernard. 



The Hon. John Rose, Sworn : 

I was Commissioner of Public Works from the month of January 1859 till the be- 
ginning of June 1861. When it was determined to construct the public buildings at 
Ottawa, it was also determined to let the contracts for their construction, to public com- 
petition, and notices to contractors were issued with that view. I understood that 
the tenders were to have schedules of prices attached, such as were printed and dis- 
tributed with the forms of tender. The tender of Mr. McGreevy had no schedule of 
prices sent in with it. The tender of Charles Peters had a schedule so far as I recollect, 
but the Council having the matter before them, awarded the contract to Mr. McGreevy, 
but required that a schedule of prices should be prepared by him, to the satisfaction of the 
Department of Public Works. 

So far as I recollect, the Deputy Commissioner was directed to see that Mr. Mc- 
Greevy sent in a schedule of prices, in compliance with the conditions of the order in 
Council. I have no recollection of seeing the schedule, but the Deputy Commissioner 
reported that the schedule had been adjusted between the Department and Mr. Mc- 
Greevy. There was no distinct agreement between me and Mr. McGreevy, or any of the 
contractors in regard to prices, apart from the written contract. I made no agreement 
with Mr. McGreevy before the contract was signed, that the schedule of prices should not 
apply to extra or additional work, though I may have expressed an opinion to him or the 
Deputy Commissioner that if there was extra work it should be paid for at fair prices. I 
cannot say, however, that I have any distinct recollection of stating this. I certainly never 
intended that Mr. McGreevy should have any advantage over any other one who tendered, 
and who put in a schedule of prices. I never contemplated any extra work without a 
written order. I thought the contract had so provided for it. I never intended to make, 
and I never made any arrangement, except what is of record formally in the Department, 
by which the express terms of the contracts were to be altered. I say that there was no 
distinct or definite arrangement to my recollection, between me and Mr. McGreevy to dis- 
pense with the schedule of prices, as applicable to extra or additional work, which should 
deviate from, or control the terms of the contract either before or after it was signed. 

I was not aware till towards the end of the year 1860, that extra work, to any un- 
usual or extraordinary amount had been done. My attention had not been specially called 
to it. I was but the political head of the department. It was the duty of the deputy 
Commissioner, and the assistant Engineer and Architect, to see that nothing was done, 
but what the contracts or orders of the Department warranted. 



96 



When my attention was called to it about the 29th December, 1860, by Mr. Page, in 
his letter of that date, (See blue book, pages 246 and 247,) I made a memorandum in 
my own writing which expressed my views. It is in these words. " Irregular to refer 
to supposed verbal authority. I have no recollection of any special communication with 
reference to this, except that I may have said I thought it reasonable the contractors 
should be paid a fair price for extra work. But architects are responsible for their pro- 
gress estimates being in accordance with terms of contract, and it was never intended to 
deviate from the contract. Do progress estimates show how much extra V 

I expressed the same views in my report to Council on the 16th May 1861. I have 
no personal recollection of the letter of the 23rd March 1860, to Messrs. Fuller and 
Jones, respecting the schedule of prices, though I may have seen it. If it is meant by 
the question which is asked, whether any private arrangement as regards the prices to be 
allowed for extra work, was made with Mr. McG-reevy varying from the terms of the 
contract, I have no hesitation in saying, that I never intended directly or indirectly to 
convey such an impression to him or any one else. 

I had no private communication whatever with him, and I cannot recal to my recol- 
lection that I had any official interviews with him before the contracts were signed. I 
made it a practice whenever practical questions came up, to have some one or other of the 
professional officers of the Department present at official interviews. As regards extra 
work I knew there could be none, without a requisition or written order being given, and 
then I never contemplated that it could be to any great extent. Having this idea in my 
mind, my particular attention was not given to the schedules, which I have since seen 
provide prices for extra as well as contract work. I do not think I was aware of this 
until the autumn of 1860. It is quite possible, though I have no recollection of it, that 
I may in conversation have at some time or other expressed the opinion that if there was 
extra work, its actual value should be allowed, whether that value fell short of, or ex- 
ceeded the contract price ; but if the contract made other provision for extra work, I 
should certainly say the contract should be adhered to. 

I most distinctly deny having on my part had any verbal understanding with the 
contractors as to prices or anything else, at variance with what I supposed were the terms 
of the contract or schedules, and it is absurd to suppose that any verbal communication 
with any head of Department could control the formal stipulations of a written contract. 
I cannot say from my own knowledge whether it is usual that schedules of prices apply to 
extra as well as to contract work. I did not suppose there would be much extra work, 
and it is quite possible that I may have expressed the general opinion, that if there was 
it should be fairly paid for, and it is equally possible, that on the supposition that there 
was no contrary provision in the contract, I may have said so, if the question came offi- 
cially before me. I considered the question of extras of less importance, as I did not 
contemplate they would be very great, and I never meant to authorize any extra work 
whatever without previous reference to the Department, and having the cost ascertained 
before-hand, as will be seen has been generally done. 

Every officer in the Department from the Deputy down to the lowest clerk, is at 
liberty so far as my consent is necesssary to state everything connected with these con- 
tracts, or any other official business during my administration of the Department of Public 
Works. 

(Signed) John Hose. 



Frederick Preston Rubidge, sworn : 

I am assistant Engineer and Architect for the Department of Public Works. My 
duties as regards the progress estimates of these buildings were to compare the amounts of 
work, and prices sent in, with the contract and schedule of prices to see that there was 
no deviation from the contract prices. In the first two I received there were no extras 
and no remarks made. When the March estimate was received and examined, I found 
extra work charged at rates, which on comparing with the schedule prices attached to the 



97 



contracts for both buildings, did not agree. I referred the matter to the Deputy Commis- 
sioner, Mr. Keef'er, and to my surprise, I learned from him that the schedule prices were 
not to be applied to extra work, aud upon this information, I made the memorandum on 
the March estimate, " No schedules prices given, the rates being determined by the local 
u judgment and experience of the resident architects, and clerks of works, and are taken 
11 to be fair aud just/' and this memorandum embodies what I understood him at the time 
was to apply to extra work. As the subsequent estimates came in, I took it for granted 
the prices charged for extra and additional work were correct, and I signed them as 
vouching for their correctness as to contract work, and for the correctness of the calcula- 
tions of the extra work, but not as approving of the prices of the extra work, for I had 
nothing to guide me, On the 21st June, 18G0, after I had received and examined the 
supplementary estimate for the Departmental buildings for the mouth of May, and dis- 
covered the vast amount of extra work, and varying and increasing prices, charged for it, 
for which I knew of no authority, I made a memorandum in writing to the Department 
which I pray may be read. In this memorandum I couched my desire to the Commission- 
er in terms as respectful as T could, my wish to be relieved from the duty ot signing the 
estimates as vouching for the correctness of the extra and additional work. 

This memorandum the Commissioner had under his notice, for on the back of it, I 
find his reference of it to the Deputy Commissioner, and I find also the report of the De- 
puty Commissioner upon it, which I pray may be read. (Exhibit No. 41).) Soon after, 
the Commissioner to the best of my recollection, told me I should still be required to sign 
the estimates. I am the more confirmed that the Commissioner himself so directed me, 
from the fact that in my report to the Secretary of the 20th November, which I pray may 
be read, I find that I say my signing these estimates as desired by the Commissioner, must 
be taken merely as a proof that I have compared the present with the foregoing estimates, 
regarding the amounts to be paid. I pray this to be read with the references thereon 57, 
« 58, 59, GO. 57 is my report; 58 Mr. Kecfer's endorsement theron; 59 Mr. Rose's en- 
dorsement; 60 Mr. Page's. I called the attention of the Department from mouth to month, 
to the large and increasing expenditure on extra work on these buildings, and I made my 
reports to justify myself, for no one seemed to know anything about them, and when the 
Commissioner himself at last became aware of the magnitude of the expenditure he seemed 
much concerned. 

Extra work 100 per cent over the contract had been sent iu from time to time, and I 
was surprised. I cannot say what he said on any of the occasions, but I know when my 
last report of the 20th November was before him, his own endorsation on the back refers 
it to Council, with a view as I understood to its investigation. On some occasion I can- 
not say when, when the matter was being talked over, he said he had spoken of there 
being no objection to fair prices for extra work, but he had never authorized any 
departure from the schedule prices attached to the contract. I never heard any- 
thing from the Commissioner that he had authorized a departure from the schedule 
prices. The only one who ever did so was the Deputy Commissioner, who said it 
was understood the schedule of rates was not to apply to extra and additional work, 
but the prices were to be determined by the architects. I know nothing of any 
arrangement with Mr. McGreevy to do this, or anything except the letter of the con- 
tract. I think a week or ten days, at most a fortnight, according to the force employed, 
could have determined any questions as to the sites and foundations of these buildings. I 
see that the architects were instructed as to the plans of the Parliament buildings on the 
9th September, and as to the Departmental buildings on the 14th September, and they 
were required to have them made and sent in by the 10th October. I do not see that it 
would have hindered them materially in making their plans and specifications, if they had 
been requested to furnish the Department with the block plans of the buildings, and not 
to make the sections for the foundations or specify for them, until the sites had been fixed, 
and the foundations tested. There was time to do all, if it had been determined to do it. 
There was little reference to me about these buildings. 

The Deputy Commissioner and the Architects managed it themselves. I think i* 
would have been prudent to have sunk test pits, and exhibited the actual, instead of an 
assumed foundation line to tenderers for contract, My own impression was, there would 

13 ■ " '■■■■] -■ — -' *"" 



98 



Lave been no difficulty about the foundation of the Parliament Building, for I supposed the 
rock was near the surface on that part of the ground. I had formed no opinion of the 
sites of the Departmental Buildings. 

From the time the plans were selected till the end of May, 1361, I had never gone 
near the buildings. On the 20th May, 1861, I received instructions from the Depart- 
ment, which I put in and read. (Exhibit No. 61, Departmental No. 36,844.) Also, order 
in Council of 15th May, Departmental orders 15th and 16th May, 1861, and the report of 
the Deputy Commissioner of the 17th June. (Blue Book, pages 327 to 333.) 

I went to Ottawa in the end of the same month, and remained till the end of June- 
Mr. Keefer was with me the greater part of the time. I did everything he desired me to 
do, and after he left I made preparations for an independent measurement of all the extra 
work which had been done on the buildings, and had obtained the plans and cross sections 
so far as I could, and had made some measurements on the air ducts and drains in the 
western Departmental Building, when the lion. Mr. Cauchon came into office, and the order 
in Council under which I acted, was rescinded in August. Soon after the contracts were 
entered into, and in the end of May, 1159, Mr. Keefer told me that on going over the 
number of rooms required for the different Departments, 7 were omitted by the architects, 
and 9 were required, 16 in all, and wished me to extend on a plan, the north return of the 
cast front of the western Departmental building. I pray to have read Mr. Reefer's report, 
(Blue Book, pages 269, 271.) I did so but my suggestions were not carried out, so far as 
I know, but I understood additional room had been provided in the basements. 

After my return to Quebec in June, 1861, I found an estimate, I think the July one, 
for the Parliament building, without the architects' names, it had the name of Mr. Bowes. 
I declined to sign it, as the contract required the architects' names to it. I am of opinion 
that the style of architecture of these buildings is not the most suitable for this climate. 
The breaks and angles in the walls and roof are objectionable, on account of the water and 
ice. I did not think they were the style the advertisement called for. I drew the ad- 
vertisement at the request of Mr. Rose, and it contemplated rigid economy not ornate, 
but plain, like the better style of buildings in this country. The notice is in the Blue Book, 
page 9, which I pray to have r jad. I am not aware of any preliminary or other estimates 
being prepared by the Department except those in Blue Book, pages 1 to 10. I have 
with me the original description of the Parliamentary buildings, accompanying the pre- 
mium designs. I put in a copy (Exhibit No. 62.) I refer to the architects' description 
of the adaptation of the building to the site, aud the heating and ventilating. 1 have also 
the original description of the Departmental buildings, accompanying the premium de- 
signs. I put in a copy, (Exhibit No. 63.) I considered the Parliament building could 
not be built for the appropriation. I thought the Departmental buildings might be built 
for the sum appropriated for them. The reasons why they have not been clone for the 
money are, the extra foundations, the introduction of heating and ventilating, and the 
drainage and work connected with these. There was provision made for heating and venti- 
lating in the original designs, which should havebeen sufficient under the limited appropri- 
ation, till the Legislature provided another system. The altering of the premium desigus 
to the contract plans, was not submitted to me for any revision. I had nothing to do with 
the tenders for the buildings. I do not know why. T saw wrong walls when I was iu 
Ottawa. I consider it the duty of the architects to furnish figured plans from which the 
clerk of works can work without mistakes. I think it is the duty of the architects, in intri- 
cate buildings like these, to see that the walls are in their right places. For example, if any 
mistake occurred in the Buttresses of the Library, the whole groining would be wrong. 
I think it was their duty to see that the foundation walls were right. I think, the 5 per 
cent remunerates them for this, as well as for measurements. The clerks of works make 
the measurements, but the architects are responsible that they are right, and their signa- 
tures to the estimates vouch for their correctness. I do not say they should measure 
every trifle, but they should know the measurements are correct. If the architects felt 
that the appointment of the clerks of works was not in accordance with the known rule 
of the profession, they should have protested against it ; if they did not, they are respon- 
sible for the measurements and the proper supervision of the work. If, as I am informed, 
there is an omission of the chases for water and gas supply, it is a serious one. When 



90 



schedules ;irc attached to contracts by which the prices of extra and additional work is to 
be valued, they are adhered to in the Department, and it is the general rule of the De- 
partment to have tlicm. The use of the schedule of prices is very obvious, it shows the 
basis of prices under which the contract is taken, and it shows the prices at which extra 
and additional work is to be performed, so that when the quantity of work has been as- 
certained, there is no room to dispute about the price. 

(Signed,) F. P. Rubidge. 



ioth SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT 



JOHN WILSON. Q. C. Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 



• 



Samuel Keefer, recalled : 

In answer to the question why it was that the prices mentioned in the Schedule at- 
tached to the contract were not to apply to extra and additional work which was left 
unanswered, 1. now say distinctly that the arrangement made between Mr. McGreevy 
and the Commissioner was, that extra and additional work, not included in the contract, 
was to be paid for at fair prices, and that the schedule of prices was to apply only to the 
contract work for progress estimates, and I say that in view of this, the ordinary form of 
contract was not used, and the clauses in the body of the contract, as I understood it, are 
so drawn, as not expressly to apply extra and additional work to schedule C, which is the 
schedule of prices, but they are expressly drawn to apply to progress estimates. I refer to 
the first section of the loth clause of the contract as expressly applying the progress 
estimates to schedule C, and I refer to the 4th section of the same clause, where it is said 
that " if any change, alteration or addition shall entail extra expense on the contractor 
either in labour or materials, the same shall be allowed to the contractor," omitting the 
words " upon the basis of the schedule of prices hereunto annexed marked C, and upon 
none other basis or scale/' as mentioned in the first section of the said 13th Clause. 

It was well known then that the schedule of prices did not represent the actual value of 
the work, but fell short of it by a large per centage. If applied to the extra and additional 
work done by the contractors it would not pay the " extra expense," which I understood 
this clause to authorize. I now refer to the objections of Mr. MeGreevy's lawyer to the 
draft of the contract marked No. 41. I had those objections in my possession while the 
terms of the contract were being settled. The answers in the margin thereof, in pencil, 
are mine, and in my hand writing. Looking first at the objection to paragraph No. 5, 
" Is it just that the contractor shall be bound to keep insured the building and materials 
to the amount of 75 per cent during the entire progress of the works ?" my answer is 
"Yes," on the margin. Looking at the objections to paragraph No. 10, which are, "If 
any changes, alterations or additions (which mean extras, and which idea ought not to 
be entertained at present by the Commissioner) shall happen during the progress of the 
works, is it fair that the Commissioner shall have the right to fix the prices for which 
these extras shall be made ?" my answer is "Yes," on the margin. Looking at the ob- 
jections to paragraph No. 12, which are " if, during the progress of the work, there shall 
arise any difference of opinion as to what is to be considered as work included in the con- 
tract, although not specified in said contract, is it fair that the decision of the Commis- 
sioner on any such difference of opinion, shall be taken as final ?'' my answer is on the 
margin " Yes." 



ioO 



Looking at paragraph No. 13, the objections in which arc, u If any difference of 
opinion shall hereafter arise as to the interpretation of the contract, is it just that in such 
an event the decision of the Commissioner shall be final, and that the Contractor shall be 
called upon to waive any claim for arbitration" : my answer is " yes, the Commissioner 
has no direct interest in the matter, only do justice between the Contractor and the Gov- 
ernment." 

Looking at the last objection, "another paragraph marked No 3, being the last clause of 
the proposed draft of contract, is injurious to the Government and would ruin any con- 
tractor." I say that on the margin at the foot of this, is this memorandum in the hand- 
writing of Mr. Hose : " This last, for consideration of Attorney General," and bears the 
initials J. R. of Mr. Rose. 

I refer to the letter of the Department to Messrs. Fuller and Jones, of the 23rd March, 
1860, when no extra work whatever had been returned to the Department requesting 
them " to transmit at their earliest convenience a schedule of prices, at which the extra 
work at the new Parliament Buildings should, in their opinion, le returned and paid for 
in the progress estimates" ; and I refer to the letter of Messrs. Fuller and Jones, in reply 
thereto of the 30th March, 1860, in which they say that they had the honor to lay before the 
Commissioner of Public Works the following prices fixed for extra work on the Parliament 
Buildings, and at the same time begged him to state that it was impossible to fix with any 
degree of accuracy a complete schedule of prices until the works were further advanced : 

Excavation in rock not exceeding 5 feet in depth $1.25 

Do below foundation depth 1 .90 

Masonry in foundations and backing, per toise 8.00 

I say that this letter of Messrs Fuller and Jones was referred to me for report, and 
©n the back of it I made the following report : — 

" After seeing the work and discussing the prices with the architects and clerk of 
works, I have agreed to these prices as fair and just for the extra work, and the estimates 
will, in future, be made at these prices." 

Upon the back of the letter is written the word " Approved." by the Hon Mr. Rose, 
and his initials are put to it. A copy of the letterfof the Department is put in, marked, 
exhibit No. 43, and a copy of the letter of Messrs. Fuller and Jones is also put in, exhibit 
No. 44. The prices mentioned in this letter are the prices at which the extra work was 
rated and allowed in the March estimate, which was received by the Department in the 
beginning of April, after I had had an interview with the architects at Ottawa, referred 
to in that report. When 1 made the memorandum on that estimate u the schedule of 
prices does not govern extra work" ; I supposed the contract had been drawn to meet it 
in accordance, as I understood, with the arrangements between the Commissioner and Mr. 
McGreevy. 

I see by my instructions for the drawing of the contract to Mr. McGreevy when he 
was sole Contractor, and for the drawing of the contracts when they were divided, that I 
speak of schedules of prices to be attached to the contracts without restricting them to pro- 
gress estimates only. I cannot now account for the omission. I knew the con racts were 
intended to be drawn so that the extra work should be paid for at fair prices, and that the 
Commissioner himself so understood it. I now refer to, and pray to have read, the letter 
of the Secretary to Messrs. Stent and Laver of the 7th February, i860, (Exhibit 45,) de- 
siring them by order of the Commissioner to furnish him with an estimate in detail of 
the quantity of masonry ; the prices at which the extra work is estimated, and to the letter 
of the Secretary to them of the 8th March, 1860, which I pray may be read (Exhibit 
No. 46). Also the letter from the Secretary to them of the 23rd March, 1860, which I pray 
may be read, (Exhibit No. 47,) and the letter of the 16th June, 1860, from Stent and 
Laver, to the Secretary, and of the 21st June, 1860, from F. P. Rubidge to the Secretary, 
with a report from the Deputy Commissioner to the Secretary, dated the 25th June, 1860, 
which I pray may be read (Exhibit No. 48.) Also the letter of the 1st February, 1860, to 
the Honorable Commissioner from Stent and Laver, with a note of my own on the back of 
it, which I pray may be read (Exhibit No 49.) And a letter from Stent and Laver to the 



101 



Commissioner, dated the 28th February, 1860, which I pray may be read (Exhibit No. 50.) 
And a letter from Stent and Laver to the Commissioner of the 12th March, 1860, which 1 
pray may be read (Exhibit No. 51.) Also a letter from Stent and Laver to the Secretary, 
dated 14th April, I860, (Exhibit No. 52,) which I pray may be read. And a letter of the 
28th Juuc, 1860, with a memorandum on the back from Stent and Laver to the Secretary, 
which I pray may be read (Exhibit No. 53.) And a letter from the Secretary to Messrs. 
Stent and Laver, dated 11th July, 1852, already put in (Exhibit No. 83,) which I pray may 
be read, and a copy of an order in Council, dated 15th May, 1861, which T pray may be 
read. (Sec Blue Book, page 327.) ■ 

In accordance with received practice, and in fairness to the profession, the successful 
competitors were employed to carry out their own designs, and they were to receive the 
usual professional allowance of 5 per cent on the contract for the performance of this duty. 
It would be their duty to prepare detailed working drawings, to lay out and superintend 
the works, to make the monthly progress estimates for the contractors, and to be respon- 
sible for their correctness, to report progress to the Commissioner, and make special 
reports to the Commissioner whenever called upon. 

To aid them in this duty, clerks of works, and afterwards when it became necessary 
ineasureres, appointed and paid by the Department were placed under their orders, to sec 
that their plans, and the orders to contractors were faithfully carried out ; to assist them 
in laying out the work, and in making up measurements and estimates. By this arrange- 
ment, the Architects were placed in the entire charge and controul of the works, under 
the Department, and were made responsible as well for their proper execution in confor- 
mity with the contract plan, as for the correctness of all measurements and estimates given 
under their hands, especially for the monthly progress estimates, which by the contract 
they were authorized to make. 

It is clear from page 250 of Blue Bock, that it was in this light, Mr. Stent under- 
stood his duties, when he says, u our arrangement with the Department embodies a 
guarantee for the correctness of the measurements and calculations, made upon the work 
during its progress and at its completion." 

After having secured, as it was thought at the time, the best architectural skill, and 
practical knowledge in the country, it was expected that the works would be conducted in a 
thoroughly efficient and practical manner. The prize plans gave evidence of architectural 
ability. The University of Toronto, nearly completed, then under the superintendence of 
Mr. Morris, as Clerk of Works, was considered his best recommendation. 

He was appointed and paid by the Department ; accepted and approved, by the 
architects. They were informed of his appointment 10th and 12th December, 1859. 
(See Blue Book, pages 131 to 134.) And that until the building would be commence! 
in spring, it was thought he could attend to both the Parliamentary and Departmental 
Buildings during the winter, plainly implying that more assistance would be given them 
when asked for, and required. When assistance was asked for, it was given, though not 
so soon as required. 

The Chief Engineer recommended the appointment of measurers, and it was done. 
On several occasions during the progress of the work, Mr. Fuller expressed, as I thought, 
very strange views about his duties. I combatted them earnestly as inconsistent with his 
position, and responsibility as Architect in charge. He said that Mr. Morris assumed too 
much authority ; but, as he was under his orders, it was his own fault if he permitted it. 
It is true Mr. Morris corresponded with the Department, but it was in relation to matters 
concerning the grounds, which had been put under his care, and in reference to his 
setting more clerks of works on the buildings and laying the foundation stone. 

Mr. Fuller contended it was not an architects duty to lay out work for the con- 
tractor*. I said I did not see how he could rest satisfied a day until he had seen that the 
lines, and dimensions were right. That if he did not do it himself he was bound by every 
obligation, to check the work after it was done, to be sure that it was right, and I remem- 
ber instancing my own practice on canals, of not delegating so important a duty as that of 
laying out a lock to any man whatever, seeing that I was responsible; and he stood, as I 



102 



conceived, in the same relation to these buildings. He would not be convinced by my 
arguments and I began to fear he would become impracticable. When I was here iu 
May and June, 1861, he must have been convinced that he had acted unwisely, for it was 
then that I discovered some walls in wrong positions, and he began measuring when it 
was too late, and did his best to adjust the upper walls on these incorrect foundations. 
He had furnished measurements of the work done, in foundations. When I appointed 
Mr. Bowes as measurer on his building, and sent Mr. Fuller a copy of his in- 
structions, he was offended because I had not instructed Mr. Bowes to verify 
the measurements he had previously given. After Mr. Page's report had been 
received, it was brought under the notice of His Excellency the Governor General, on 
the report of Mr. Rose of the 14th May, 1861, and on the 15th an order in Council was 
made upon it, and on the 16th an order from the Department to me, which I pray may be 
read. (Blue Book, pages 322, 328.) 

I and Mr. Rubidge came to Ottawa on the 27th May, and remained till the 7th 
June, when I was recalled in consequence of a change which was about to take place in 
the head of the Department. Mr. Rubidge remained. On the 17th June I made my report, 
to which I refer — and pray to have read (Blue Book, page 329.) I then believed I had 
made the arrangements so complete as to the carrying on the works, their supervision and 
measurements, that they could be carried on till the end of the building season, with the 
balance of the appropriation then on hand. 

When the Hon. Mr. Rose resigned on the 13th day of June, there was in hand of the 
appropriation $327,986.75, to which $200,000 were subsequently added by two orders in 
Council, as I understood. 

Mr. Cauchon came into office, the same day Mr. Rose left, and although I repeatedly 
offered my services to him, in regard to these buildings, and the general business of the 
office, T n?ver had anything to do with them, after his coming iu except to advise as to 
the completing the boiler house on the 17th July, when Mr. Garth came Quebec about it. 

I was not aware that chases had not been left in the walls of these buildings for gas 
and water supply. It was the duty of the architects to see that the specification and 
plans were made out for them. It is not the duty of the Department to make plans. 
I think it was not my duty to look after this or any details of these buildings. This be- 
longed to the architects. The architects of the Departmental Buildings made a mistake 
in not giving the number of rooms required iu the statement of the accommodation, by 
seven ; and the mistake was not discovered till after the contract was signed, according to 
my report of the 13th November, 1860. (Blue Book, page 164.) Sixteen rooms were 
required. 

The only written order for the change in the eastern Departmental Building, is the 
order of the 10th December, 1859. On the 28th February, 1860, the Commissioner ap- 
proved of the order of Messrs. Stent and Laver, in the blue book, page 226, which I pray 
may be read. All the other extra work in the east wing of the eastern Departmental 
Block, was done by the contractors without any written order, or any order. I certainly 
did not object to it, and it was returned iu the monthly estimate which I saw. I knew it 
was necessary, and that it could be done at no better time than it was. The only verbal 
order I ever gave, was with reference to thickening the walls, and buttresses of the 
library, which Mr. Page thought still too thin, and upou his suggestion, I gave orders for 
a further thickening of the walls, and buttresses. 

I made good this verbal order by a written one. 






103 



nth SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard. Victor Bourgeau. 

Samuel Keefer, further examined : 

I assume the responsibility of the Buildings as they are, apart from waste- 
ful or erroneous expenditure, and the system of heating and ventilating. T 
think they will hereafter do credit to the Department and to the Province. I do 
not assume the responsibility of their management. I see no difficulty in having 
the extra work, uuder the assumed foundation line measured up, by sections of the 
.Building to the contract line, and if this had been done, there would have been less 
room for dispute. There was a want of proper supervision at first, in regard to clerks of 
works ; very prompt action cannot always be taken by the Department. Mr. Morris asked 
for assistance on the olst March. Mr. Hutchison was appointed on the 17th April. Mr. 
Grist, on the 20th June. And Mr. Pelham was asked for on the 7th, and appointed on 
tne 11th July. I cannot tell why there was no estimate called for, or arrangement made 
for carrying out the system of heating and ventilating, exterior to the Buildings, after the 
plans were matured. I only approved in April, 1860, of what had to be done inside the 
Buildings being proceeded with. In vIjw of the appropriation for the Buildings, the 
system of heating and Ventilating was not warranted, but I have ah-eady explained, that I 
never supposed the appropriation sufficient to complete the Buildings, for the reason I 
have already given. The brick-work in the Parliamentary Building done latterly is not 
good. It has been subjected to unfair exposure. Some of it must come down and be re- 
built, and mo:e effectual means taken to prevent injury against the coming winter. There 
is no difficulty in distinguishing contract from extra work, in those Buildings. In their 
exterior and internal arrangements, except where erroneously constructed, and except the 
additional flues, the Buildings are in accordance with the contracts, and excepting the 
Nepean facing, about which there is no room for dispute. 

I never contemplated construing the 6th clause of the contracts, as compelling the 
contractors to make flues for the heating the Buildings, as part of the contract, beyond what 
the plaus showed. Thofirst arrangement made with (he architects, was made by the G-ov- 
ernment, who did not see fit to re-consider it. I considered the arrangement I made with 
them was superseded by the Order in Council. The arrangement I made was the custom- 
ary one, 5 per cent on the outlay, but it was not approved by the Department. The who'e 
matter is shown in correspondence. (Exhibits Nos. 5-1, 55, and 56.) 

I understood from the signatures of the architects to the progress estimates, 
which were drawn to show Contract and extra works on different columns, that they had 
satisfied themselves that the quantities of work therein mentioned, had been dem, and 
correctly measured and returned ; that the prices for contract work were in accordance 
with the schedule of prices, and the extra work at prices fair and reasonable, and no work 
returned which was erroneous or superfluous, and none of the contract work returned as 
extra. I have seen some walls in the Parliament Building too thick, and some in wrong 
places. The walls over their proper thickness, I call superfluous, so far as they exceed 
their proper thickness. Those in wrong places are erroneous. I was not aware that ail 
the walls had been measured, and returned as they are. I was not aware that stone from 
the excavation had been returned in the estimates as material d- livered ; it ought not to 
have been done. I knew that the stone from the excavation had been used in part for the 
pick-faced masonry. 

I have no knowledge of the certificates issued by the Hon, Mr. Cauchon, for the 



104 



money in hand. I never saw anything in the office to authorize their issuing. I should 
not have considered that certificates for warrants could he issued under these contracts, 
without estimates of work done, and materials delivered to justify their issuing. I do 
not think it was right to build a brick wall inside a stone wall, where the plan showed the 
brick-work to be part of the wall. It made it unnecessarily thick. 

A contract was drawn in the office of the Department in the usual form, and submit" 
ted by the Commissioner for the approval of the Council. I learned from the Commie" 
sioner, that he had some difficulty with his colleagues, on the clauses in his draft of eon- 
tract relating to extra works, and that he was on the point of sending in his resignation 
on account of it. Knowing that if he resigned, it would fall to me to execute the con- 
tract, I then told him that if a contract were prepared which he would not sign, then 
I would not sign it; and so the matter rested, I think for a day, when I learned that the 
contract would be drawn by the law officers of the crown. This was done. 

I considered that it was the intention of the contract to pay for extra and additional 
works, at their fair value, and this is made apparent by the objections to the draft which 
were raised by Mr. McGreevy's lawyer. (See exhibit No. 41.) I think I was not present 
at the signing of the contract, and cannot say whether Mr. McGreevy made any objection 
to it or not, but certainly the attaching of the schedule to it, which is on a printed form 
with the words " as well as for alterations, additions, or works dispensed with," was not 
in accordance with his agreement, or with the 4th section of the 13th clause in the body 
of the contract. I cannot account for the fact that the contracts were signed without first 
striking out these words in the heading, for it was an error to leave them in. My attention 
was not directed to it until some time after the works were begun, and I think that my 
first note on the first estimate, which contained extra work, was written under the full 
belief that the contract warranted that memorandum of mine on the March estimate. 
From the first commencement of the extra works done, to the period of their stoppage, 
that is for the first estimate for March, 1860, to the last one for November, 1861, the prices 
paid in their estimates for the extra and additional works have been regulated, or designed 
to be regulated at what was their fair value, and not at the rates of the contract schedule. 
This has been done with the full knowledge and approval of the Commissioner, from the 
commencement of these works, down to the period of his resignation in June 1861, and 
he has directed Departmental action on various occasions in reference to the payment for 
these extra works. Not only has the interpretation which I have put on the contract, 
been acted upon all along with the full knowledge of the Commissioner, but also with the 
knowledge of the Government. After the Commissioner had communicated the Chief 
Engineer's report on the state of the contract, by his report to Council 14th May, 1861, 
(Blue Book, page 323,) and during all this time no objection has ever been raised to this 
mode of allowing for extra and additional work. On the schedule of tenders received by 
the Department, which I caused to be made, and which was submitted to Council, dated 
15th November, 1859, I marked against Mr. McGreevy's tender the word " informal," as 
having omitted mention of fire-proofing, and a schedule of prices. No alterations were 
made but such as are specified in the list of questions and answers, which are attached to 
the contracts. They were made with my approval. Estimates of the value of the build- 
ings by trades, were submitted by the architects. I have referred to them before, and no 
other. These were not official. Heating and ventilation to a certain extent had been 
provided for, as before explained, but neither gas nor water supply was embraced in the 
estimates further than the preparation for their introduction, as shown in the plans and 
specifications. 



105 



1 2th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON Q. C, CHairman, 

Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Samuel Keefer, further examined : 

It was not known that the heating and ventilating would be attended with so much 
outlay. The Government was not informed of it till the Commissioner submitted the Chief 
Engineer's report on the 14th May, 1861. The Department was aware of what the esti- 
mates showed from time to time. It was the duty of the architects to have made the 
estimate for heating and ventilating, whether it was asked or not, before they embarked in 
it. These buildings are not the only work I have to attend to, as the Deputy Commis- 
sioner of Public Works. There are various other works, engineering and architectural 
all over the two Provinces to be looked after, such as roads, bridges, canals, slides, piers, 
harbours and light-houses. The Deputy Commissioner must necessarily reside at the seat 
of Government, and cannot be long absent from the duties of his office ; and in the man- 
agement and superintendence of these various works, engineers, architects and superintend- 
dents must be employed, and have local charges assigned them, and must have the 
confidence of the Department until they are found unworthy of it. I make these 
observations to show that it is impossible for the Deputy Commissioner to have his whole 
attention directed to these buildings. 

(Signed) Samuel Keener. 



13th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 

MEMBERS PRESENT : 



JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Chairman, 
Joseph S heard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Willtam Hutchison, sworn : 

I am Clerk of Works for the Eastern Departmental building. I was a builder in 
Montreal for about 20 years. I assumed my duty as Clerk of Works on the 29th April, 
1860 When I came, about 50 cubic yards of the front wall were built, and the excava- 
tions were made to the basement floor line. The boiler house was excavated to its depth, 
part of the clay excavation of the drain had been removed outside the building of the 
boiler house. 

I acted under the instructions of Mr. Morris, who directed me as to alteration of 
sketches he had. I had tracings of the contract plans, and these were in an office where 
I had access to them. I laid out the walls, and they were correct when the basement 
walls were laid upon them. There was one wall only out of place, afoot ; it arose from the 
sketch Mr. Morris gave me, being wrong in the figure, 1 foot, it was 24 by 8 or 9 feet. 
It was measured as an extra and a blunder. I measured for the progress estimates from 
14 



106 



the beginning, and I measured for the Departmental buildings for the month of June, 
1861, when Mr. Pattison came. I was told to measure for the month of April, soon after 
I came, aud I continued to do so from month to month. I measured the excavation, earth 
and rock, and all the works, from the time I came till Mr. Pattison came. I gave the 
measurements and a rough copy of the estimate to the architects, and they added the 
prices aud checked the estimates. When I knew the prices I added them myself. 
The architects set the prices. I measured all the contract work as such, and the 
extra work as extra. The day's work bills were always for the extras. The sche- 
dule of prices for the contract was adhered to as near as possible, but the schedule 
prices were never applied to extra work. There is not much difficulty in telling what 
is contract and what extra work in the buildings. I can show the extra work under the 
foundations, and I can show the extra work in every wall. The building has been sub- 
stantially built according to the contract, and the additional work can be shown. During 
the construction of the building, labourers' wages were on the average 80 cents, masons 
$1.50 to 81.75, bricklayers $1.75, stone cutters $1.75. I cannot speak positively as to 
carpenters, but they rated from $1.25 to $1.50 per day. 

I consider all the excavation for the eastern block worth 25 cents a yard. Rock 
excavation in foundations is worth $1.50, one depth with another. There was a great deal 
of rock excavation in the drain. The rock excavation in the main drain to 20 feet deep is 
worth $2, and from that to its depth $3 per yard. The pumping extra. The branch drains 
the same. The ducts are on the top of the drains, wherever they could be so placed. 
The excavations were not too wide, some had to be widened. The rock from the excava- 
tion was good for rubble masonry, and cut-stone for ducts, and inside work. It was a 
little rough. 

I always measured the rock from the excavation, as material delivered every month. 
I measured it, and the architects allowed 54 feet to a toise at 87 cents. I got the working 
plans from the architects. There was great difficulty in getting detailed plans. In 
my opinion a contractor ought to have his detailed plans at the commencement of 
the building. The loss to the contractor is this, if he has all his moulds, he 
can cut up his blocks to advantage, if he has them not, he wili often have to lay aside 
pieces of block till he can use them. The masons had often to be moved from one place 
to another, to work till the plans were ready. If men are pushed the work is never so 
well done, and they were often pushed from this cause. In some cases they were so hur- 
ried that the stone would be built in the wall, not rubbed, as it should have been, and so 
even affected the measurement. Nine-tenths of architects do not give plans when they 
ought, and these architects were not the exception. I have got plaus for a building all at 
once; and in a contract of $48,000, there was no extra work, from ali the plans being 
complete. It is too oiten the practice of the architects not to have the plans. I always 
tried to carry out the orders of the architects, and Mr. Morris, although I had differences 
of opinion with them. We differed chiefly about the construction of the roof, and they 
had their own way. I thought mine was the best, and still think so. The foreman of 
the contractor had to make nine-tenths of the detailed drawings, and submit them to the 
architects for approval, in order to have them in time. I am acquainted with the modes 
of measurement in Montreal. I built the banking building of the Bank of Montreal, the 
Bank of British North America, the St. Andrew's Church, High. School and St. Patrick's 
Hospital, and a great many private buildings in Montreal. I built Chalmer's Church, and 
and the banking houso of the Bank of British North America in Quebec. I was engaged 
to superintend and did superintend five of the banking houses in the Upper Province. I 
mauagad them as I saw fit. I do know the prices and value of work. Rubble stone 
masonry is measured in Montreal by the toise of 86 feet, cut stone by face measure. 
Openings are all measured in rubble masonry, but deducted in cut stone and brick work, 
including flues. Rubble masonry, such as is in the foundations of these buildings, can bo 
done in Montreal for $6.50 to $7 per toise of 86 feet. A toise of 54 feet would be a third 
less, $4.33 to $4.67. In Montreal rubble stone and lime are 20 per cent dearer than in 
Ottawa. Sand is cheaper in a greater proportion. 

In buildings like these a contractor cannot get? the same amount of labour out of the 
men employed as he can on gmall buildings. The rubble masonry in these building^ 



107 



from foundation to top of the lowest part of the main cornice, is worth per cubic yard 
$2.67 or $5. 34 per toise of 54 feet, or about $8.50 per toise of 86 feet. For the first 10 
feet above the cornice 10 per cent, 'fur the next 10 feet 15 per cent., and 15 per cent, on 
every 10 feet, far as any height of tower on the Departmental Buildings goes should be 
added. 

The main tower of the Parliament Building would cost more as it went up. The 
masonry in the ducts and drains, measuring the face work as rubble, is worth $2.44 per 
yard, deducting openings, or $4.88 per toise, of 54 feet. These prices include the meas- 
urement of the cut-stone facings, and openings in the buildings, but exclude the openings 
in the drains and ducts, and all these prices include a profit of 20 per cent, to the con- 
tractors. The pick-faced stone work in the ducts and drains, is worth 25 cents per foot, 
face measure, including material. The actual cost of the labour is 10 ecntfs a foot, but I 
add 15 cents for the material, and profit on the material and labour. 

The arches and inverts, I value the same. They are worth 78 cents a foot, measured 
on the soffit. This includes the skewback. Labour is worth 40 cents, material, 25 cents. 
Profit on both, 13 cents, in all 78 cents a foot. The stone work in the boiler house, the 
average face of one foot; will require two feet of stone. The cost of a cubic foot of stone, 
is 25 cents. Two feet required for one of face, 50 cents per foot, of face. Dressing per 
foot, superficial, 20 cents, to which I add, 14 cents for profit, 84 cents per foot on the face. 
The arches in the boiler house, I measured the face and soffit, and I allowed fifty per cent 
more per foot than the plain faced work. The pick-faced arches, through the division 
walls, I put at 61 cents per foot, on the face. I measure the soffit and the face on each 
side. The arches will average three feet thick over the buildings. Each arch contains 
about 36 cubic feet, at 25 cents per foot. Cutting, 3d feet three-inches, at 25 cents per 
foot. The stone in each arch is worth $9. Labour, $8.81. Profit, $3.56, in all, 
$21 37 for each arch, or 61 cents per foot, superficial. The Nepeau stone faciug is worth 
23 cents per foot, superficial. 

The stone is worth when quarried, $7 per toise, of 216 feet, which will make 135 feet 
of facing. It will take 3$ loads to carry a toise, at $2.50, $8.75 a toise. The dressing of 
the toise which would make 15 yards, is worth $7.50, or about 5£ cents a foot. Pointing 
in the wall, 17 cents per yard, making $2.55, $25.80 is the actual cost of a toise of 
stone, and what facing it produces. To this I add 20 per cent, $5.16, making in all, $30.96 
for 135 feet, or 23 cents per foot, superficial, in the wall, pointed and finished. Lime 
stone facing done in the same way, would have cost 16 cents per foot, superficial, 7 cents 
per foot is the difference between Napeau and lime stone. I detail the lime stone, thus : 
A toise suitable for coursed work, would cost at the building, $8, dressing same as Nepean, 
pointing the same. The cost of 135 feet, is $18.05, to which add 20 per cent, $3.60, in 
all, $21.65. Ohio stone is worth delivered in Ottawa, 66 cents per foot, 25 cents at the 
quarry ; and freight 15 cents ; railway, 12 cents ; cartage, 5 cents ; contingencies, 3 cents ; in 
a ll, 60 cents ; 10 per cent to cut it up for the stone-cutters ; in all, 6Q cents. The 
pressing, plain faced, per foot, is worth 16 cents ; plain circular work, 25 cents ; sunk 
straight work, ISceuts: circular, 27 cents ; moulded straight work, 35 cents ; moulded 
circular, 45 cents ; crandled and chiselled work, 16 cents ; rubbing, plain faced, 3 cents ; 
m oulded work, rubbed, 7 cents ; labour on quoins, 16 cents. 

These prices for cutting make up the actual cost, and to them, to the contractor, I 
would add 20 per cent. Brockville stone, I value the same as Ohio — the stone costs less, 
but the work is more, and more waste. In measuring brick-work, the openings are ex- 
cluded, but r>ot flues here. The brick-work in these Departmental Buildings, is worth 
$12.50 a thousand, which includes a profit of 20 per cent. There were different sized brick 
in the buildings, when I measured them, there were 18$ bricks to a cubic foot, and this was 
a fair average. I measured the work for the progress estimates on the eastern Depart- 
mental Building, for the year I860, and to June, 1861. Mr. Morris did not doit. I 
measured for the progress estimates as hear as I could, but I re-measured the work for Mr. 
Page, as far as it was then done. The excavation in the main drain, was not wide enough 
at first, we had to widen it when it was determined to put three ducts over the drain. At 
first it was not determined how this was to be. The lowering of the excavation of the 



108 



boiler house, caused the drains to be deeper, so as to drain it. The floor of the boiler 
house mentioned in the contract, was to be four feet under the basement fleor, and one foot 
for footings. The actual one is 10 feet under it, or 12 feet three-inches to the footings of 
the walls The excavations and drains, were made a little under this last depth. The 
stone taken from the foundations, was built in the rubble walls of the eastern building. 
There is none left in fact. The hard-pan is in the east wing. There was hard-pan in 
the bottom, and hard digging for four feet over all that part of the building. I stated 
what it was to the architects, and it was all returned as hard pan, I suppose. The deck 
joists are as they should be, the rafters are a little wider. I ordered some of them to be 
so. They are 14 inches apart, they were to be 1 4 inches from centre to centre. The iron 
joists are 20 inches apart, over the record rooms, instead of 14 inches as specified. I did 
not object to them, nor was my attention ever called to the distinction, which was this : 
Certain of the rooms called record rooms, were by the original specification to have iron 
joists, 14 inches apart. Then it was arranged that all the wooden joists were to be sup- 
planted by iron ones, at 20 inches apart, and instead of making the parts, which were 
originally intended to be wood, with joists 20 inches apart, and the record rooms 14 inches, 
they were all made 20 inches apart. The iron joists could have been got delivered here 
at $80 a ton. 

I never disobeyed the orders of the architects, but I sometimes wished my own way, 
and they wanted theirs. Sometimes I got it, sometimes they made me do theirs, which 
I should not have done, if I had been allowed to do as I wished. 1 do not remember, 
what the letters were about, of which the architects and Mr. Morris have spoken, but I 
recollect I could not understand them, and I carried them back to be altered, but Mr. 
Stent would not do it. I meant no disobedience of orders. 1 was ordered by Mr. Page 
when he was here, to make plans showing how the eastern Departmental Building was 
built, and I made them. When Mr. Page came, I showed him my measurements of the 
building as it was, in figures. He directed me to go and make plans of the work at it 
was, and I did it, up to the ground floor, showing what was contract, and what extra. I 
subsequently made plans of all the work. The additional work is on what we call the east 
extensiou, and was intended for the Bureau of Agriculture. As I understand, the lower 
room is 45 by 31 feet, and intended for a model room, I do not think this style of 
building well adapted to this climate, want of cave projection is the fault. The water is 
not thrown from the wall. The deep valleys are an objection and should be avoided. I do 
not think the want of chases for water, in the walls, a serions matter. You cannot in this 
climate have chases in the outer walls, and bells and gas can be put in the brick walls 
without much expense. I think all water and gas pipes, and bell wires should be as ac. 
cessible for repair as possible, so as not to be unsightly. 

The pins showing the centre lines of the building, were in when I came on the work- 
I omitted to speak of the prices of the hard-pan spoken of, the filling and ramming the two 
kinds of Nepean stoae flagging, in the bottom of the ducts, the roofing and slating, and the 
branch drain. The excavation of the hard pan or the four feet hard digging is worth 60 
cents per yard. Filling from spoil bank 20 cents per yard. The ramming was returned 
as extra days' work in the progress estimates. The Nepean flagging iu the bottom of the 
air ducts is worth 8$- cents per superficial foot laid. 

The flagging over the cold air ducts perforated is worth 56 cants per foot. This in- 
cludes all the work on it, laid in its place. In the branch drain with the dish bottom, 
this bottom is worth 63 cents a foot face measure. The rough flagging covering it, is 
worth 10 cents. The sides the same price as ducts and drains. Plain slating is $8,40 
per square, ornamental $9,60. The Ohio stone in the quoins in the building is worth 74 
cents a foot superficial in the wall. Limestone is worth 44 cents, the difference is 30 
cents per foot. All these include a profit of 20 per cent. The value of roofing is worth 
$21 a thousand feet, board measure, this includes lumber, boards, and labour. 



109 



1 5th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q, C., Caairman 



Victor JBourgeau, Fsq., David Stark, Secretary 

William Hutchison, further examined : 

The greater part, certainly over two thirds of the stoue for cut ,stooe in the sides of the 
ducts and drains, came from the excavation, but the stone for the arches is from the quarry 
in Gloucester. The dressed stone now on the ground is more than half from the excavation, 
the rest from the Gloucester quarry. The masonry in the ducts and drains except the 
rough arches, was chiefly built of the stone from the excavation, a very small part of stone 
brought from other quarries. Nearly two thirds of the rubble stone in the whole build- 
ing, is from the excavations The lumber for covering the foundation walls as the work 
proceeded, and the time it took to cover them, w r ere returned as extra work by order of 
the architects from month to month as the work progressed. This lumber was afterwards 
taken by the contractors, and so much allowed for tear and wear while it was used. The 
pumping of water from the excavations was also returned as extra days' work every month, 
in which pumping was done. 

In buildings like these, the actual level of the ground should have been showi 
and test pits ought to have been sunk, before the plaus were completed, and 
exhibited to contractors. The plans for heating and ventilating should have 
been matured and shown also, it would have saved a vast expense in extra work. 
The extra work was carried out with as much care as the contract work in the 
eastern Departmental buildings. 

There was unnecessary expense in making the side walls of the hot air chambers 
thick enough to c;rry the joists. The joists ought to have gone over to the principal 
wall ; this would have saved the wall from the spring of the arch, and saved the tilling in 
above the spring of the arch to the floor, with concrete. The brick wall on Mr. Garth's 
plan showed the brick lining as part of the principal wall. As they are built the princi- 
pal walls are wholly built of stone, and the brick wall against it, uselessly as 1 suppose. 
These walls are about 500 feet long in all. The foundation wall was 9 inches thicker to 
support the lining, and the lining and flUing above the arch is superfluous. 

The principal drain from the building over which all three of the air ducts, part of 
the way, and five the other part, are situated, runs nearly north from the building to the 
bank, 385 feet, and is in some places 30 feet deep in rock, while if the drain had been 
carried directly to the bank, its length would have been 177 feet, and the deepest excava- 
tion about 21 feet. The drains are now open at the bank and it is intended to lead the 
drainage, as I have heard, in pipes to the Ottawa river. The drains as they are now con- 
structed are nearer the river than I think they ought to have been, but if the pipes are 
made of any material cheaper than silver, they cannot cost so much as the masonry. I 
never heard of auy reason for making this drain where it is. The foundations in the rear 
wall of the west wing, and part of the tower, were stepped in the rock by stone cutters, at an 
expense of $313, extra days' work ; it ought to have been done by quarry-men, and would 
have cost $50. This was done chiefly before I came. The stepping in the western De- 
partmental buildings, I did with the quarry-men. The roof in my opinion is too heavy. 
It would have been better with 25 per cent less lumber in it. In the construction of the 
roof, I wish it stated, as the work went on, if my view had been adopted, the roof would 
have been finished to the main tower. As it is, only a small portion is slated, and the 
rest is covered with felting, in a temporary way, but at an expense of over $2000. 

(Signed) William Hutchison. 



110 



George Brown Peliiam sworn : 

I was educated an Architect, but followed the business of a Contractor. I have 
been clerk of works for the Western Departmental Building since the 25th July, 1860, 
but I was appointed on the 11th July. I was sent to assist Mr. Morris as assistant clerk 
of works. I reported myself to him on the 11th July, on my arrival, and he instructed 
me to go upon the Parliament Building for a fortnight or so, to look round generally, and 
then I should take the Western Departmental Building entirely to myself. I took charge 
of the Western Departmental Building on the 25th July, 1860 ; at that time the clay 
had been nearly excavated for the south and the west wings. The surface of the ground 
had been removed from the east wing between 3 and four feet, and a little of the rock ex- 
cavation in the main drain, beginning at the river end. We completed the excavation of 
the two wings first and started the masonry on them. I had plans from the architects 
and plans from Mr. Garth of the cold air ducts, to enable me to start the masonry. I found 
the heating and ventilating showed a greater depth than the architect's plans. I asked 
Mr. Morris what I was to do ; he told me to go deep enough in the basement to get rooms 
11 feet 3 inches, and 2 feet 3 inches for the footings; I did so : these depths were about 
2 feet 3 inches deeper in the back rooms than the contract plans showed. 

The plaus for the front part of the building showed no basement story, and the exca- 
vation in this was to be 4 feet for trenches for the footings of the walls; all wider and 
deeper.than this was extra. I excavated the whole of the basement in front to a depth of 
9 feet on an average over the whole area; this was all extra except the trenches for the 
lootings of the walls to the depth of 4 feet as shown on the contract plans. At the west 
angle of the building the clay was 7 leet 6 inches thick, the rock 2 feet 2 inches. At the 
south-west angle the earth was 6 inches, the rock 5 feet 1 inch. At the south-east angle 
the clay was 8 feet 3 inches, rock 1 foot. At the north-east angle the clay was 7 feet 3 
•inches, rock 5 feet 3 inches. 

The average depth of clay on the whole area was 6 feet ; rock 4 feet. The length of 
the main sewer and ducts over it, from the boiler house to the edge of the bank of the 
river, is 368 feet ; width at top average, 24 fest ; depth on the average, 27 feet ; deepest 
part, 29 feet ; width at bottom average, 14 feet. The drain, when fiuished, was 2 feet 6 
inches wide by 4 feet 6 inches high ; top and bottom arched. This excavation was built 
up of solid masonry from the bottom to 6 inches over the arch stones of the drain, being 
an average of 9 feet. At this height the masonry was levelled off, and three cold air 
ducts set off upon it 3 feet 9 inches wide by 3 feet 6 inches high, flat on the bottom, arched 
on the top. Solid masonry between, to a height of 5 feet 9 inches, where the masonry 
was again levelled off, and upon it two more cold air ducts of the same size were set off 
and the masonry built on an average of 6 feet in height. The excavation thus completed 
contained the drain at the bottom, next upon it three cold air ducts, and next upon them 
two cold air ducts. 

The plan L, I now put in, to show the plotting and the section of the drain, its length, 
width and depth. 

The plan M, 1 now put in, shows the sections of the ducts over the draiu, and the ex- 
cavation and masonry, also a section of the drain and ducts as finished. I think it could 
have been constructed at a third less work than it was, but I am not certain, from the na- 
ture of the rock which laid at different aud irregular angles "against the run of the draiu. 
l.inade the plans I now put in during the winter of.l860-'6l, at the request of Mr. Page ; 
there was no plan of it while the work was going on. Mr. Morris staked out the line of 
the draiu and I directed the excavations. I generally took my instructions from Mr. 
Morris, sanctioned by the \rchitects, but no measurements were given me. I was told to 
take the drain from the boiler house and give it a fall of 2 iuches in 10 feet. I had no 
special directions as to width, but it had been commenced and I followed the width begun. 
I was directed to excavate the boiler house 13 feet below the basement floor line, and this 
was. the depth of the bottom of the drain as it left the boiler house ; the boiler house was 
pick-faced masonry. The drain and ducts inside the building were also pick-faced, but 
outside the drain was pick-faced and the cold air ducts rubble masonry, excepting 30 feet 
from the end where the sides and arches were cut stone. The bottom? of the ducts all 



Ill 



through were paved with Nepean flag stones. The stone from the excavation which was 
good was used for rubble masonry and pickfaccd stone work ; what was bad was taken west 
of the building where it now is; no part of it was measured by me as material delivered, 
but when it was built in the walls I returned it as masonry, and when it was dressed I 
returned it as dressed stone in the monthly estimates of work done. The stone from the 
excavation was used in filling up the excavation for the drains and ducts, and for the 
heavy work in the foundations. 

Two-thirds of the rubble masonry in the walls in the foundations and basement of the 
building, were stone from the excavations, and the same proportion in the drains and ducts 
I should say that two-thirds of all the extra work in the foundations, ducts, and drains 
was made from the stone from the excavation. I measured, for the monthlv estimates, up 
to the time Mr. Pattison was appointed to do it, in June, 1861 ; I made the measurements 
as accurately as I could, and on a measurement in the winter of 18G0-G1, it was found my 
monthly returns were rather under than over. The contractor's foreman laid out the walls 
but I checked them, and they are correct in the western Departmental Building. 

The excavation in the main sewer and ducts was completed in 1860 ; I began the ma- 
sonry in them and the boiler house in March, 1861. The walls in the boiler house are 4 
feet 6 inches at bottom, 3 feet 9 inches at top, they batter 9 inches. The boiler house 
masonry is of large stone from the Gloucester quarries — there may have been a few from 
the excavation. The average number of feet of pick-faced masonry done- in winter, was 
from 10 to 12 feet per day a man, face measure. The men were working by the piece ; 
I think they got from 10 to 12 cents a foot, but I cannot say ; it was done by masons who 
had been on the building and whom the contractors wished to keep on during the winter. 
I am not acquainted with the general mode of measuring work in this country, but, I be- 
lieve, in Ottawa it is face measurement. The division walls are thicker than the plan 
shows. Mr. Morris told me the walls were to be of the same thickness as in the eastern 
Departmental Building, where it had been settled what the walls were to be ; I afterwards 
consulted with the architects who said it was right. There is one entrance to the boiler 
house from the back area, 3 feet 8 inches wide, directly on the landing, from which you 
get to the bottom of the boiler house by a flight of steps ; there is no way to it by the 
basement, except through the basement rooms. There is another door from the area behind, 
3 feet by 9 feet wide, into the west corridor, and through this door and round the corridors, 
a distance of 160 feet, the fuel will have to be carried to the fuel rooms. 

The architects directed safes to be built of Nepean stone instead of lire bricks; there 
would be a saving in this; I cannot tell how much. The safes are not as in the contract 
plan as I understand them ; they have now iron joisting and a concrete floor at the base- 
ment, instead of an arch. I think the arch was safer There is little difference in ex- 
pense between the iron joists and concrete floor, and the arch. The safe rooms are not 
lined with Toronto pressed brick inside, but white brick, made, I think, at Brockvillc. I 
cannot say whether they are as good as Toronto brick, which I never saw. 

The buttresses at the west entrance and at the angle of the south-west corner and east, 
doors are not shown on the basement plan, but they are on the ground plan and elevation. 
I did not allow them as extra, except under the foundation line, as they were showu on 
the ground plan and elevation. 1 thought it was a mistake they were not shown on the 
basement plan. There is an alteration on the east front, it is a projection of 3 
feet by 22; the windows in it are as in the contract plan ; the architects ordered this, 
and the three feet at each end and the cut stone quoins on it are extra ; I had a 
tracing of it given to me by them. In the staircase windows there are extra dressings 
inside, by order of the architects. The plan showed ordinary windows, as in rooms, but 
on the 17th May, 1861,. I had an order to make the windows double-cased with cut stone 
through ; this made extra work on windows, 8 in number. The octagon tower at the 
north-west angle is increased in size, 3 feet 9 inches on the north, 9 feet on the south, and 
9 feet on the east ; it was ordered by the architects upon a Departmental order, as I 
understood. The area walls are carried to the rock ; this was required. The walls are 
9 inches below the basement floor line. Thiee arches in staircases were ordered instead of 
iron girders. I measured the walls as they are for my returns ; wbat the contract requir- 



112 



cd I measured as contract work, and what was extra as extra ; extra thicknesses of walls 
were measured extra. 

In the rough rubble work I measured openings, in the brick work I deducted them. 
I allowed 20 bricks to the cubic foot. I measured the brick, 19 and 20 was the general 
average to the foot. In making the excavation around the building, we found many 
boulders, and the excavation had to be made wider than it otherwise would. I allowed 5 
feet on the east front, 4 feet on the south, and 3 feet on the west, and behind 4 feet. 
Beyond the walls I allowed no days' work extra, but around the building the boulders and 
earth fell in, and I allowed the measurement I have mentioned, as a liberal allowance for 
the trouble, as the earth had to be carted away. I do not know who ordered the bouchard 
work in the arches in the division walls, it was the architects or Mr. Morris, and it 
is the same in the other building. I think they were of no use; fair rubble masonry for 
the ducts and arches would have been as good. I think the brickwork was as good as in 
the eastern, it is rougher, but as strong ; we had not so good a class of men, and the work 
in the east wing has been more exposed. 

The whole building was done in nearly four months. We were stepping some of the 
foundations, as late as the 24th June, 1861. Part of the cornice on the west front is out 
a little. I think it was pushed out in putting on the roof. 

From the month of June, I superintended the building, and made the estimates, and 
I made rough plans of the work, as I went along* from these I afterwards made the plans 
for Mr.* Page. The ground floor plan I put in, marked N. I returned the quantity, not 
the price of the iron joists. There was no delay to speak of, in getting detailed drawings. 
The other Departmental building was four months in advance of this, and the details of 
both were alike in many cases. I was sometimes delayed a little in waiting for them from 
the other Departmental building. I drew all plans which I put in marked. 

I was appointed by the Hon. Mr. Rose, but nothing was said about salary then, but 
I got 863 a month till the Hon. Mr. Cauchon came into office when I got $83 a month. 
I was told I sliDuld have the same pay as others, and my back pay the same as the others, 
but I have not got it. Mr. ftose told me I should be put on the same footing as the 
others, when lie was here in September, 1860, and it was promised from time to time, but 
I have not got it yet. Mr. Hutchison got his pay increased, but mine was not, and it 
remains at $83 a month, the others are $100, except Mr. Larose, who got $116. 

I returned no hard-pan, there is none under the Western Departmental Building. I 
returned clay and rock only. The clay was full of boulders from 6 inches to 4 feet in 
diameter, and pebbles mixed. It was afterwards returned by the architects as boulder 
excavation, upon conversation with the contractors. The architects returned the same 
excavation in the winter, as half rock, it was frozen, and the contractors said it was as bad 
as rock. There were two windows in the water closets finished outside, with cut stone, 
like the windows in the stair cases, but with more work. I had no orders, but the detailed 
plan showed it, and I worked to that. 

The balcony over the south eutrance door is extra. I had a detailed drawing of that, 
and also a window over, which was increased from 3 to 4 lights, and other slight alterations, 
which I had in the detailed drawing of it. There is an extra in the main cornice, it s 
larger and has more labour on it. I had the detail of this from the architects. I mado a 
sketch of the cornice on the scale from the original drawing. Comparing this with the 
detailed drawing as I got it from the architects, they do not agree. I should say, the work 
on the cornice as executed, was 25 per cent over the other. The architects admitted the 
one detailed was larger, but they said it made no more work. The contractors claimed it 
as an extra. 

I think when the work started, there ought to have been two clerks of works besides 
Mr. Morris. On the Parliament Building, when the masonry was started, there ought to 
have been two clerks of works. 

Signed, George Brown Pelham. 



113 



1 6th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman. 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bouroeau. 

Toussaint Trudeau, sworn : 

I am the Secretary of the Department of Public Works. I was appointed about the 
middle of December, 1859. I receive all the letters of the Department, and the progress 
estimates come first into my hands, as well as all the letters addressed direct to the De- 
partment. I receive the letters and whatever is enclosed, and submit them to the Com- 
misiouer. When the chief Commissioner and deputy are both present, the letters and 
papers received during the day, are submitted to them, if either is absent they are sub- 
mitted to which ever of them is present. If an estimate for these buildings were receiv- 
ed, the chief commissioner or deputy would direct its reference to Engineer's Office, from 
that it would come to the commissioner again, and would generally be referred to the De- 
puty Commissioner before it was paid. The chief Commissioner orders the payment of 
the estimates when he is in town, when he is not, the deputy orders the payment. Either 
of them disposes of the business. There is no written order for the payment of an esti- 
mate more than an ordinary account. They are treated alike, and no written order given 
by the commissioner or deputy for their payment. I attend when the business is disposed 
of, and [ am directed to pay what is to be paid, without any written memorandum. I 
then send the estimate or account to the Accountant, Mr. Baine, who checks the calcula- 
tions, and prepares a certificate that so much is due the party entitled to it. It then 
comes back to me, I examine it as to its date, and agreement with the note of it on the 
margin of the book irom which it is cut, to see that they agree. I notice whether it is 
charged to the right account, and from the right appropriation When I am satisfied of 
these things, I put my initials to the certificate. It is then takeu to the commissioner by 
the accountant for his signature, or in his absence, the deputy commissioner. It is then 
sent to the Minister of Finance, who sees whether there is money appropriated for its pay- 
ment, and on his certificate that there is money, a warrant is issued for its payment. 



17th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT I 



JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 



Joseph Sheard, 



Victor Bouroeau. 



Toussaint Trudeau, further examined : 

In writing official letters I generally say I am directed by the commissioner to do it, 
for if the Deputy orders nie, I understand him to do it in the name of the Commissioner. 

I look at my letter of the 7th February, 1860, (Exhibit No. 45.) I am not prepared 
to say by whose direction I wrotejt, nor am I prepared to say by whose direction I wrote 

15 



114 



ray letter of the 8th March, (Exhibit No. 46.) I look at my letter as Secretary of the 
Department, of the 23rd March, 1860, to Messrs. Fuller & Jones, (Exhibit No. 43,) and 
to Messrs. Stent & Laver, of the same date, marked (Exhibit No. 47.) I look at the copy 
of a letter of Messrs. Stent & Laver, of the 12th Marcli, 1860, to the Department. I have 
examined the copy with the original, and I find my own note on tho back of the original 
" act on this." It was acting on the memorandum on the back of this that I wrote the 
letters of the 23rd March, to Messrs. Fuller k Jones, and Messrs. Stent & Laver. 

I find on the back of the letter of Messrs. Stent & Laver, a memorandum made by 
the Deputy Commissioner to the Commissioner in these words. " This is a good sugges- 
tion, and I recommend that it be at once acted on by calling upon each of the architects, 
and the clerk of'works to forward a list of the price upon which the extra work should 
be returned and paid for in the progress estimates." I cannot recollect that the Com- 
missioner directed me to write the letters of the 23rd March, but this memorandum is of 
a class always referred to the Commissioner, and I have no doubt, the directions to act, 
were given to me by him. 

(Signed,) T. Trudeatj. 



Thomas McGeeevy, sworn : 

I am contractor for the Parliament Building. I was the original tenderer for the 
whole work. I gave in no schedule of prices with my tender. The Order in Couucil 
giving me the contract made it a condition I was to put in a schedule of prices. I put in 
a schedule, it was made on the printed form, and I have not seen it since. Mr. Keefer 
said the prices in it would overrun the contract before the work was finished ; they were 
too high. He said the architects were preparing one which should apply to the contract 
work only. I said I should not sign one which should apply to extra work, unless it were 
one to my own satisfaction. I made objections to some of the clauses in the contract, and 
it took some days to settle the contract. I got a note from Mr. Keefer to say the contract 
was ready, and I went over to sign it. I had read the contract before, but I did not read it 
then. J did not read the schedule, or know that the heading of it applied to extra or addi- 
tional work when I signed the contract. I signed it the evening I went over. When the 
contract was being drawn I understood the schedule was not to apply to extra or additional 
work. I never had any private conversation with Mr. Rose or any member of the G-overn- 
ment about it. I think Mr. Rose knew it was not to apply, but I cannot swear to it. 

As soon as the contract and specifications were printed, I saw that the heading 
applied to extra and additional work, and I went to Mr. Keefer immediately about it, and 
spoke to him. He said I need not mind. It was a mistake in not leaving out the head- 
ing, it would be all right, or to this effect. I think, but am not certain, either Mr. Jones, 
or Mr. Haycock, was with me at the time. It was between Mr. Keefer and me that the 
agreement was made that the schedule of prices should not be applied to extra or addi- 
tional work, before the contract was signed. Nothing was said about the schedule when 
the contract was signed. If I had noticed the heading of the schedule I would not have 
signed it. Nothing was said about it till I saw it printed, as I have stated. 

(Signed,) Tuos. McGtReevy. 



John Henry Pattison sworn : 

I am an Architect and Building Surveyor by profession. I have followed it 22 years; 
14 in England and nearly 8 years here. I was appointed on the 1st day of June, 1861. 
I put in a copy of the letter appointing me and detailing my duties. (Exhibit No. 64.) 
I immediately entered upon my duties, and commenced measuring the work done in May, 
1861. I measured from that time to the present on these Departmental Buildings. I 
had nothing to do with the Parliament Building. I measured the work monthly, made 
out the quantities, and handed them to the Architects. I measured for May, June, July, 



115 



and August. I had commenced with the September estimate, and I had also checked all 
the measurements of the excavatiou in the sewers, ducts and main buildings, the rubble 
masonry in all those, aud sundry minor measurements. T had made tracings of all the 
plans of the two buildings. I had entered all the previous estimates in books for that 
purpose, and opened abstract books for my own measurements at the time Mr. Killaly 
came. Up to this time I had adopted the mode of measurement which had been pursued 
before my appointment, which was to measure excavation by the cubic yard. Rubble 
masonry by the toise of 54 feet, including openings, and all walls under 2 feet as 2 feet. 
I had not been accustomed to measure openings in walls, or walls thicker than they were, 
to contractors, and I mentioned this to Mr. Keefer and Mr. Rubidge, both of whom 
directed me to measure them as had been done and I did it. I measured cut stone cubed 
for materia], and all kinds of chiseled work on the visible face. 

Brickwork, deducting all openings, excepting flues and allowing 20 bricks to the 
cubic foot. I had measured the bricks in the work and fouud about 18 J bricks in the 
foot, but Mr. Rubidgc, to whom I mentioned this, directed me to allow 20 to the foot as 
had been done before. 

Nepean stone facing I measured over the whole face, deducting for window and door 
openings, from the external part of the worked sill to the spring of the arch for the height, 
and from angle to angle of the outside chamfer for the width. On this matter I had some 
doubts, but on referring it to Mr. Rubidge he did not say he directed the system but ad- 
vised me to follow what had been done. My own view was to measure the actual facing 
of the Nepean stone. I had not heard till I came here of the 72 feet toise of French feet 
of Lower Canada. 

On the 30th September, 1861, Mr. Killaly, gave me written instructions to measure 
the building, aud the mode of measurement which I now show, and put in a copy of it 
which I pray may be read. (Exhibit No. 05.) He consulted me on one item, the mode of 
measuring cut stone in England. I told him inmeasuring labour upon it I should measure 
according to the English system; for plain work, one bed and one end, and on the face, in 
all cases where the stone had to be reduced to a plain face in order to apply the necessary 
moulds for cutting to the required shapes. I told him I had little experience in measuring 
cut stone work in this country. I had made some objections to measuring beds and joints 
in the ashlar work of the drains and ducts, and the boiler house, and some objection to 
measuring the centreing over the whole surface. I had been told verbally to measure the 
ducts and drains solid, but I did not conceive my instructions warranted me in doing so, 
and I did not until I received written instructions from the architects, being the letter of 
Mr. Killaly to them, dated 23rd October, 1861, a copy of which I put in (Exhibit No. 60) j 
after this I added the centreing. I made solid the drain and ducts from which before I 
had deducted the opening, and I added beds and joints in the limestone ashlar. I then 
made an approximate estimate of the quantities thus measured, and on the 22nd October 
T took it to Mr. Killaly who approved of the form, aud with a letter directed me to carry 
it to the architects to be priced out, which I did I did not see it again till the following 
January. Ho did not consult me as to prices on my mode or on any other mode of measure 
ment. I did not enter this estimate in the books, for I never saw it after I delivered it 
to the Architects till the 22od January, 1862, and again on the 31st March, 1862, when 
it was handed to me by Mr. Clarke, one of the Contractors, for my signature, with a letter 
from Mr. Killally, which I now show and put in a copy, (Exhibit 67.) it is dsted the 26th 
March, but I received it on the 31st. I signed the estimates, but before doing so I con- 
sulted Mr. Stent as to whether I had better sign them or not. He considered I had better 
and I did sign them I sent them with a letter, a copy of which I put in, (Exhibit No. 68.) 
If I had been asked to sign it, approving of prices, I should have refused, but as I was 
asked to sign it to certify measurements, I did it. 

I never saw any of the prices allowed by Mr. Killaly, till I had completed my final 
measurements, about the 22nd day of January 1862. I had not the order of the items of 
my approximate measurement of October, and I got it from Mr. Stent, to make my final 
one in the same order, then I saw the prices fixed upon for the work. His price of 40 
cents a foot upon the ashlar would make it about 60 cents face measure, and his mode of 



116 



measurement and prices would add about 50 per ceut to the former prices. In rubble 
masonry, Mr. Killaly's mode of measurement is by the cubic yard, for which he allowed 
$0,50 per yard. $13 per toisc of 54 feet or $20.20 for the French toise of 86 feet. I 
had no instructions as to charging for the stone, or allowing for it. T measured the 
masonry as I found it built. 

In applying my instructions from Mr. Killaly, [found cases of this kind. A brick 
wall by the contract was to be 1 J brick, but was built 3 bricks thick. I asked him if 1 
was to measure the I extra and leave the other half as the contract work. He said no. 
All was to be measured, and priced extra, and then the price of the contract work deduct- 
ed. I look at the blue book, page 415, item 63 of the western Departmental building, 
and I see 1,674,110 bricks, of which 753,060 are contract, the difference is 921,050 at 
$13.80, amounts to $12,769.80, but by Mr. Killaly's mode of estimating the whole as 
extra at $13.80, and the contract at $6.30, the amount is $18,358.44, the difference 
$5,588.64. 1 look at blue book, page 409, item 62 of the eastern block, and I see 
2,002,571 bricks, of which 957,360 are contract, the difference in quantity is 1,045,211 
at $13.80, amounting to $14,433.91, but by Mr. Killaly's mode of estimating the whole 
as extra at $13.80, and the contract at $6.30, the amount is $21,604.11, the difference 
$7,180.20. In all the walls for both buildings, the footings are specified to be two courses, 
each six inches with a four inch projection. This a cubic foot to every foot in length, as 
executed. The bottom course is one foot three inches in height, and one foot six inches 
wider than the wall. The second course is 1 foot high and 9 inches wider than the 
thickness of the wall. The cubic contents 2 feet 7 \ inches. The difference 1 foot 7£ 
inches cube on every wall over all the buildings. 

I did not return the item 91 of the eastern block of $5,000 for scaffolding, nor the 
item 92*] of the same block of $2,632 for temporary roofing. Neither the item 86 of the 
western block of $3,500 for scaffolding, nor the item 87] of the same block of $5,264 for 
temporary roofing. I put in a copy of my instruction from the Department, when Mr. 
Killaly came, (Exhibit No. 69.) According to the mode of measurement adopted by Mr. 
Killaly, and carried out by me, all the excavations for ducts where they were not cut stone, 
were measured as if filled with solid rubble masonry, to the height the masonry was carried 
up. All the ashlar work was maasured as rubble work, and then the cut stone at its bed, 
joint and face, but where the openings were ashlar face, they were deducted. 

I did sign in March the estimates which Mr. Killaly made, as measurer of works, 
under the circumstances I stated, but only as certifying to the correctness of the measure- 
ments. I had nothing to do with the modes of measurement, or prices allowed for extra 
work. 

Where I found a wall out of place and thickened, but a wall which was shown on the 
contract plan, Mr. Killaly directed me to measure it as extra, and also as contract, with a 
view to its being deducted. In this way, all brick which in any way varied in thick- 
ness or height from the contract, was rated by him as extra, at the extra price of $13.80, 
and then the contract work contained in them was carried out at the contract rate of 
$6.50, instead of first deducting the contract from the whole quantities, and carrying out 
the differance as extra work, at extra rates. 

On the two Departmental Buildings, it makes a difference of $12,768.84 in favour of 
the contractors. In looking over the evidence given by Mr. Killaly, before the commis- 
sion appointed by the Legislative Council, I see that Mr. Killaly admits having ordered the 
system of measurement in answer to question 30, page 7, of minutes of this evidence. In 
measuring brick walls, no deductions were made for flues, the smoke flues were generally 9 
by 14, the air flues about 6 by 12, a few were 6 by 18 inches The walls were measured as 
solid, openings such as doors were deducted. I asked Mr. Stent yesterday, for my bills of 
quantities, upon which Mr. Killaly made his estimate, and I was told he had them not. I 
now put in copies of my draft to show my quantities as given to Mr. Killaly. The draft sub- 
stantially agrees with the bills I gave. They are exhibits 94 and 95, I pray they may be 
read. I put in also my estimate of quantities of contract brick-work, which ought to have 
been deducted from the extra work, before the prices were carried out. They are the 
same as are mentioned in items 62 and 63, of Mr. Killaly's estimate This is exhibit 96. 



117 



I look at in Mr. Killaly's estimate items, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11 (blue book, page 406) ; and items 
76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 80 J, 81, 82, 83, 84, 84*, (pages 409 and 10) ; 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, (blue 
book, page 412) ; and at items, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 75*, 76, 78, 79, 79*, (blue book, page 
415.) In constructing the building, certain alterations, and substitutions, took place in 
cut stone work. The stone work in these was all measured extra, and carried out at 
extra prices by Mr. Killaly, and the quantities of work so dispensed with, and being 
those which the contract required, were carried out at contract prices, and then deducted 
instead of deducting the contract quantities from the extra, aud the carrying out the 
extra work at extra rates. 

This made a difference in favor of contractors, of $28,720.71 on the two Depart- 
mental Buildings. I put in a table of the quantities replaced by work of a different kind, 
carried out iu detail, and exhibiting the result spoken of. (Exhibit 97.) The earth exca- 
vation in the west Departmental Building, consisted of clay with boulders. The architects 
and Mr. Killaly, on account of the difficulty in excavating it, agreed that it should be re- 
turned as half hard-pan, and half clay, and this was done at their suggestion. Mr. Pelham 
had returned it as clay with boulders. I had no special directions at the eastern Depart- 
mental Buildiug, and took Mr, Hutchison's return for it as he made it. I put in a copy 
of the letter carried by me to the architects, from Mr. Killaly, accompanying my ap- 
proximate measurements. (Exhibit No. 98.) 



1 8th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman, 
Joseph Shearp, Victor Bourgeau. 

John Henry Pattison, further examined : 

I look at item 57, page 409, of the blue book, being the estimate for the eastern 
block, and I find the quantity of cut ashler, in the boiler house, sewers, and ducts to be 
28,572 feet, at the rate of 40 cents per foot, amounting to $11,428.80. On looking at 
items 79 and 80, in Mr. Page's estimate, I find the face work' for the boiler house, is 
returned as 720 feet, at 90 cents, amount to $648 ; and 3,988 feet, at 87 cents, amount 
to $3,110.64. 



The Honorable Joseph Cauchon, sworn : 

I say I became Commissioner of Public Works about the 13th June, 1861, and con- 
tinued till about the 23rd May, 1862. I look at the certificate for $40,000, as No. 7917, 
dated 11th September, 1861, in favour of Thomas McGreevy. JI explain that when works 
have been ordered, and money appropriated, there is no authority required for the Com- 
missioner to issue a certificate. He may do it of his own authority. I also explain that 
when I found how things had been carried on in regard to these works, I would not pay 
anything on estimates. I took care that from what the estimate showed, I was not over- 
paying for the work. 

Progress estimates are intended to show the work done, with a view to advances ', but 
are not conclusive on the government, only to show that the bulk sum is not being overpaid, 
while the work progresses. I only made advances on account to be settled afterwards 



118 



between the contractors and the government. This order was issued by me on account, out 
of the Parliamentary appropriation. A copy is put in marked. Exhibit No. 70. 

I now look at certificate No. 7,999, dated 8th October, 1861, for $40,000 in favour of 
Thomas McGreevy. It is signed by me, and ordered to be paid by me, of my own 
authority out of money appropriated by Order in Council of the 23rd September. A copy 
of this order is put iu (Exhibit 71), the copy of certificate is Exhibit 72. I now look at 
certificate No. 8,085, dated 19th October, 1861, for $10,000 in favour of Thomas McGreevy; 
it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid by me, of my own authority out of money 
appropriated by the same order in Council, of the 23rd September. A copy of this certi- 
ficate is put in, (Exhibit 73). 

I now look at certificate No. 8,192, dated 20th November, 1861, for $45,000 in favour 
of Thomas McGreevy ; it is signed by me and ordered to be paid by me of my own 
authority, out of money appropriated by another order in Council of the 19th November, 
1861. A copy of the order in Council is put in, Exhibit 74. A copy of the certificate is 
put in (Exhibit 75). I look at certificate N©.^ 7,749, dated 1st August, 1861, for $10,000 
in favour of Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid by 
me, of my own authority, out of money appropriated by Parliament. A copy is put in, 
(Exhibit 76). I look at certificate No. 7854, dated 24th August, 1861, for $40,000 in 
favour of Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid of my 
own authority, out of money appropriated by Parliament. A copy is put in (Exhibit 77). 
I look at certificate No. 7921, dated 11th" September, 1861, for $23,700 in favour of 
Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid of my own 
authority, out of money appropriated by Parliament. A copy is put in (Exhibit 78). 

I look at certificate No. 8000, dated 9th October, 1861, for $30,000 in favour of 
Messrs. Jones, Haycock & Co., it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid of my own 
authority, out of money appropriated by an order in Council of the 23rd September, 1861, 
(Exhibit 79). 

I look at certificate 8091, dated the 28th October, 1861, for $10,000 in favor of Jones, 
Haycock & Co., it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid of my own authority, out of 
money appropriated by order in Council of the 23rd September, 1861. It is put in, 
(Exhibit No. 80). I look at certificate No. 8191, dated 20th November, 1861, for $45,000 
in favour of Jones, Haycock & Co., it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid of my own 
authority, out of money appropriated by order in Council of the 19th November, 1861, a 
copy is put in, (Exhibit 81). 

I look at certificate No. 8831, dated 13th May, 1862, for $2,000 in favour of Jones, 
Haycock & Co., it is signed by me, and ordered to be paid of my own authority out of 
money appropriated by order in Couucil of the 19th November, 1861. A copy is put in, 
(Exhibit 82). On my report of the 21st September, 1861, the order in Council of the 23rd 
September was made ; and on my report of the 18th November, 1861, the order iu Council 
of the 19th November was made. Copies of them are put in (Exhibits 83, 84). On the 
3rd August, 1861, I adopted a report to Council, which I pray may be read ; a copy of it, 
Exhibit 85, is put in, no order in Council was made upon it. I paid no specific sum on 
the recommendation of the Hon. Mr. Killaly, or on the estimates. There was no regular 
estimate after the month of August, 1861, but I made some of the advances above men- 
tioned, on information received by the Department, from Mr. Killaly, in his second letter 
of the 30th September, enclosing those of the architects of the respective buildings, and 
the measurer of the Parliamentary buildings. They are put in, Exhibits Nos. 86, 87, 88, 
89, 90, 91, 92 and 93, which I pray may be read. I made advances which I conceived 
were within the amount of work done, as shown by the estimates or other documents. I 
ordered the work to be stopped with the concurrence of the government, because the 
appropriation had been expended, but the government, by the order in Council of the 23rd 
September and 19th November, enabled me to make advances to the contractors to pay off 
their men. When I came into the Department, I did not consult Mr. Keefer, the Deputy 
Commissioner, for I had no confidence in him. A few days before the Desjardins Canal 
accident, he had reported that briged^safe ; he had certified the G rand Trunk Ferry Bout 
at Montreal safe, a day or two before the explosion at Longueuil. 



119 



On an inquiry as to an accident on the Great Western Railway, thejury reflected 
upon him. In my opinion he had by his management in regard to the heating and ven- 
tilating of these buildings, and other mismanagement, driven Mr. Kose my predecessor 
from oflicc. I had therefore no confidence in him, and never consulted him about these 
works. I was obliged to look for information from other officers in the Department. In 
looking at the tender of Mr. Garth, I find his offer did not include excavation, masons', 
bricklayers' and joiners' work. Before he advised the accepting of that tender, it was 
Mr. Keefer's duty to have had an estimate of the expense of all these made, and laid it 
before the commission, and if he had, it never in my opinion would have been undertaken, 
for it caused all the embarrassment about finishing the buildings, by absorbing the money 
appropriated for them. The Department is not well organized ; for example, Mr. Reefer 
is an Engineer and has been accustomed to make canals. The assistant Engineer is a 
good draughtsman, but neither is competent to advise about the construction of buildings 
like these. The notices for designs and for the tenders for these buildings were not de- 
finite enough. They should have been so explicit, as to have admitted of no misunder- 
standing. The original advertisement for designs stated that, u the above edifices are pro- 
" posed to be built in a plain substantial style of architecture, of coursed hammer dressed 
" masonry with neatly pointed joints, and cut-stone quoins, window dressings and cornices, 
" entablatures, the material being found in the vicinity of the city of Ottawa." 

Interior walls to be of Brickwork, not such buildings as these. The plans of these 
were selected because they looked very well, but are not adapted to the objects for which 
they were intended, and have not light enough. Before the contract was let for the build- 
ings, it was the duty of the Deputy Commissioner to see that it comprised the whole build- 
ing, foundation, heating and ventilating complete, so as to avoid as far as possible extra 
work. In my opinion all that was required, was to provide heating and ventilating for 
the two legislative chambers. These are sometimes filled to excess, and it is essential to 
have the means of heating and ventilating them, but in ordinary rooms, where two or three 
are employed, an ordinary chimney flue, is all that is necessary. 

(Signed,) Joseph Cauciion. 



John Bowes, Sworn : 

I am an architect and builder. I practised as an architect eleven or twelve years. I 
had been in the employment of the Department over two years, some time before my 
appointment to these buildings, and I was appointed on the 20th May 1861 as measurer 
to the buildings. I came to Ottawa before I received my instructions. I was first em- 
ployed in checking over the measurements of the Western Departmental building, till I 
received my instructions, about the 31st May 1861. My appointment is published in 
blue book, page 349. I proceeded on the 2nd or 3rd of June to make measurements for 
the progress estimate for May, and returned the quantities to the architects. They set 
the prises and returned them to me and I made the two copies for the Department. I 
continued from month to month to measure till Mr. Killaly came. By the time he came 
I had measured all the foundations of the Parliament building, having sunk test pits to 
ascertain their depths, and I was proceeding to make a progress estimate for the month 
of September, at the time he came. 

I received instructions from the Department about the 23rd September, to afford him 
every possible assistance and information he might require. I put in a copy of the letter 
of the Department instructing me, dated 21st September 1861. (Exhibit No. 99.) On 
the 30th September 1861, I received written instructions from Mr. Killaly. I put in a 
copy. (Exhibit No. 100.) I put in a copy of a letter from Mr. Killaly to me, dated 24th 
October 1861. (Exhibit 101. ) Also the schedule of prices signed by Mr. Killaly, referred 
to in that letter. (Exhibit 10:2.) Upon these instructions I proceeded to measure the work, 
and when I had done it I made up the estimate according to the prices mentioned in that 
list 



120 



When I came, I measured on the system which had been in use. About the lGth 
August 1801, I received a letter from the Department, dated 14th August 1801, a copy 
of which I put in, and pray to be read. Exhibit 103. When I came here I found the 
openings were deducted in rubble masonry. The system in Ottawa was not to deduct 
openings under ten feet wide. This was the only difference I recollect between them. 72 
feet is atoise in Ottawa. By the contract the toise was 54 feet. In Toronto only, I have 
known 54 feet to the toise, but then the openings are deducted, and the standard wall is 
18 inches. In Ottawa it is two feet. Where stone is scarce, they deduct openings, where 
it is not they include them. The Nepean stone before the month of August, was measured 
to the ohamfer of the jambs. After my instructions of the 14th August, I measured the 
openings as meed with Nepean stone, but for the month of July and August only. Ac- 
cording to my calculation, the difference between Nepean facing and Ottawa limestone, 
would be ten cents a foot super, of the wall measured to the cut stone. 

I had not heard or known, beds and joints to be measured in this country, before 
Mr. Killaly instructed me. I had heard of it in England, where beds are given for the 
setting of certain descriptions of work. In measuring the stone for the ducts and drains 
and boiler house, by Mr. Killaly's mode, one foot on face measure would be about two 
feet six inches. The difference in the amount in money would be about $45,000, in these 
ducts, drains, and boiler house in the Parliament building. In the Ohio stone in the 
building it wouldamount to about $10,000. 

In measuring the work under Mr. Killaly's instructions, where changes and additions 
had been made, either in position, style of work, or class of material. u That is to say, 
such work and materials provided for work, coming under the head of the contract work, 
but in which changes or additions had been made, either in the position, style of work, or 
class of material, from that shown and specified. Or all work, labour and materials not 
included in original plans and specifications." I measured the extra work only. I did 
not measure the whole as extra, as was done on the Departmental buildings. If I had 
done so, and if the price had been carried out as was done in them, the difference in 
amount on the Parliament building would have been at least $100,000 more. I declined 
so to measure it. 

In earrying out Mr. Killaly's written instructions I did as follows : I measured the 
flues as solid wall, and then their length. I measured all the work as I round it right or 
wrong. I did observe useless and superfluous walls, but I measured them all, and returned 
them in my quantities. All the ducts and drains were measured as solid masonry. When 
I began Mr. McGreevy contended that all the masonry in the drains and ducts outside 
the building, should be measured solid, according to Mr. Killaly's written instructions. I 
contended the openings should be deducted. Although I was liberal as I could be, he 
was never satisfied with the dimensions of the walls in the drain and ducts. Subsequent- 
ly I made sections of the excavations ; and on them I made my measurements of solid 
work. All the face beds, and joints of the cut stone I measured by the superficial foot. 
I measured a plain face on the Ohio cut stone, and then the moulded or sunken work in 
addition. I measured a bed or joint of whatever the stone would measure. 

I measured the quoins on the building. The contractor claimed extra work upon 
them, and I measured them for this purpose. Some were up to the specification, others 
not so good; on the whole no better than the specification, but Mr. Killaly allowed 15 
cents a foot, extra work on them, in his item 81, (blue book, page 308,) about $1781.40. 
In measuring extra rubble masonry, I measured by the cubic yard not by the toise. All 
above the width and thickness shown on the contract plans, and all the walls which I 
found, not required by the contract, I measured as extra, whether they were necessary or 
not. In measuring the rock excavation in the building, I found a plan in the office not 
figured, but showing where the rock was. I showed it to Mr. Robert McGreevy, who 
said it did not show enough. He required dimensions beyond that, and forming the best 
judgment I could, I gave dimensions which satisfied him. I could find no cross sections, 
and no one to tell me exactly the depth or area. 

I spoke to Mr. Morris, and he showed me as near as he could from memory, on the 
^ront of the building. The depth of earth and rock, I ascertained by sinking pits. I 



121 



wished Mr. Killaly to allow Mr. Grist, who had been here from nearly the beginning, to 
assist ine, but he would not. He said Mr. Larose would assist, but he knew no more than 
myself. My measurements of the rock and earth excavations were made on the date I 
have mentioned. There was nothing in the office to show me otherwise, except Mr. 
Grist's sections of the excavations of the ducts and drains, which Mr. Robt. McGreevy said 
were not correct. Mr. Killaly directed me to take Mr. Grist and his sections to meet Mr. 
McGreevy, who said he had memoranda to show Grist's sections were wrong. I had ar- 
ranged to meet them at a certain time, but Mr. Killaly said he had reconsidered the mat- 
ter of Grist going with me, and he could not see the propriety of it, as the architects had 
notice that he was to be discontinued. I saw Mr. Robert McGreevy alone, and his mem- 
oranda, which he had in his memorandum book, and comparing them with Mr. Grist's, I 
found them larger. Mr. Robert McGreevy said he would have his dimensions, or have 
them all ripped up and tested. I tried to satisfy him as near as I could, and he was 
satisfied with my dimensions which were a compromise between Grist's and his own. 

Mr. McGreevy had but a memoranda of one part to show. On an examination of the 
measurement now going on, I find Mr. Robert McGreevy's dimensions are more correct 
than Mr. Grist's. I gave Mr. R. McGreevy fully more than the dimensions actually were. 
I could see no reason for excavating the rock under the building, but the architects said 
when they excavated the rock for the ducts and drains, it shook it so, that they thought 
it best to take the whole out. I have seen the book of Mr. Grist, said to be a copy of the 
book which was lost, up to July, 1860. The rock excavations then are less than I allowed 
by about 1700 yards, but I never saw that book to examine it, till I saw it here when it was put 
in. After I hacj made up my quantities and prices according to the list Mr. Killaly gave me, 
I made up an estimate and sent it to him at Quebec, on the 3rd November, 1861. It had 
the same quantities as his estimate I now see in the Blue Book, page 368, and following, 
but differently arranged. The prices are the same, and agree with the list, which he gave 
me. I had kept all the work for heating and ventilating separate, as we had previously 
done, and as I made the estimate, it showed the contract work, work connected with heat- 
ing and ventilating, and extra and additional work which was all the work extra to the 
contract, and extra to heating and ventilating. The word additional work was not used 
in the estimates till Mr. Killaly directed it; it was called extra work. There is no addi- 
tional work in my opinion on the Parliament building, it is the design carried out, with 
slight changes, which are extra work, but there is no addition to the design except the 
^ucts and main drains. 

Mr. Fuller made out the estimate as it is now fouud iu the Blue Book, from my esti- 
mate, under Mr. Killaly's instructions at Quebec. Mr. Fuller and I were sent for to Que- 
bec, and we went there on the 5th November, 1861. The estimate for the Departmental 
buildings had then been made out, and Mr. Killaly said he thought it the best form, and 
directed the one for the Parliament building to be made in the same way, and it was done. 
The columns in mine showed, first contract work ; second heating and ventilating ; third 
extra and additional work. I understood that if the estimate was made up in my way, it 
would show a large amount of extra work, more palpably, than if made up in the way in 
which it is, and it would look better in this way, but when it is aralyscd it is the same in 
fact. I had previously signed the progress estimates from the time I came. I had made 
the measurements according to Mr. Killaly's written instructions as correctly as I could. I 
had applied his prices to these quantities, and signed his estimate as measurer, certifying 
to the correctness of the measurement, and the rating of the works at his prices. I had 
nothing to do with the adoption of his mode of measurement or fixing his prices. I had 
nothing to do with either. I had no knowledge of any payments being made to Mr. Mc- 
G-roevy except on the progress estimates on the 30th September, 1861, in view of the 
stoppage of the work. I was asked by the architects to recommend an advance of $60,P0p 
to Mr. McGreevy, and knowing there was work not then returned which had been cjone, I 
recommended it, and wrote my letter to Mr. Killaly of the 30th September. I assisted in 
making out the estimate for the finishing of the Parliament building, last winter. I think 
the contract work is not quite half done, it will cost more to finish it, than has been paui 
on the contract proper. If iron roofs are put on the legislative hails, acd library, the 
work yet to h$ done on th$ fans w$ feins fttifohedj $a# other things eontettp}§tfq[ #o&e, 



122 



thero will be as much extra work to do as has yet been done. In the estimate for finish- 
ing, the quantities seemed so large, that I was afraid the whole thing would come to an 
end, and I advised Mr. Fuller to reduce the quantities, and I do not vouch for their cor- 
rectness. I think it will require $214,000.00 to finish the building without the extra* 
contemplated and $464,000.00 with them, at fair prices. 

Last winter I prepared a list of prices for work on these buildings, which will allow 
a profit to the contractor of 20 per cent ; I put it in. It is at fair current rate prices for 
work and material here, and the profit of 20 per cent. I will not say it will pay the pre- 
seut contractors, but it is a fair value for the work. It is Exhibit No. 104. The con- 
tractors here seem to manage the work at great expense. They have alsrge and expen- 
sive staff. In measuring the Nepean facing over all the openings I got verbal instructions 
from the Hon. Mr. Oauehon, to measure for July and August in that way. My former 
estimates excluded the openings. Now that I know it was a substitution of Nepean stone 
for Ottawa stone, I should measure the actual face, and allow for the actual difference in 
cost, as the correct mode. 

(Signed,") John Bowes. 



Thomas Murray, sworn : 

I am a mason and stone-cutter, I have followed the business 16 years. I have been 
in Ottawa more than 2 years. I worked on the Parliament Building in cutting and 
setting stone. I worked by the day and by the piece. I worked about 18 months on the 
building. 

From 8 to 10 feet of plain ashlar, measured on the face only, of Ohio stoue, is a days 7 
work of a journeyman stone-cutter; with this he prepares the bed and joints, which are not 
measured to the workman. The face only is measured, for straight moulded work, such 
as is in the jambs of the windows and doors of the building. Stone-cutters were paid 25 to 
30 cents a superficial foot, girthing all the chiselled face of what is seen. For the cut- 
stone in the arch of each window above the carved string cause, masons got $21 including the 
label mouldings. For the sills of the windows of the upper story, masons got $7 for each 
sill of each window. For the moulded work on the jambs of the entrance tower, 25 cents 
per superficial foot of the girth. None of the tower work was done by the piece to my 
knowledge except the sills. The circular work over jambs 45 cents a foot. The work in 
the main cornice girthing, it is worth 85 cents a superficial foot, only the seen work is 
girthed or measured. The work in the jambs of the main tower in the second story, is 
worth 25 cents a foot superficial, the arched work 35 cents. The sills are worth $7 a 
piece. Masons were paid $1.25 to 81-75 a day. 

The prices I have mentioned for piece-work, were paid in winter, and the men did 
not make great wages. In summer it would be worth 10 per cent more. Most of the 
cut-stone was done in summer. There were two summers and only one winter. When 
the work was done by the day, which I have stated was done by the piece, it would cost 
the contractor 15 to 20 per cent more. Last summer the men would not work by the 
piece, at the rates I have mentioned. They wanted $27 for the windows for which they 
had been paid $21. For the sills which were only paid at $7, they wanted $9. The 
carved string course from which the arches spring, the masons worked at 50 cents a 
running foot, without the carving, which was done by carvers. 

Masons, one with another, on foundations such as these, would build a toisc of 54 
feet each per day. The work could be done on any part of the building for the prices I 
have stated. It is the actual cost of the work of which I speak. One setter had $2 a day, 
the rest had about the same as masons, but Mr. McGreevy had apprentices who got 50 
cents a day. I have seen four in the shop. In railways in this country I have seen beds 
and joints allowed, but in stone yards in this country and in the States, what is seen on 
tjie face only is measured. 

(Signed,) Thomas Murray. 



123 



John Rowat, sworn : 

I am a Mason and Stone Cutter by trade, I have been engaged in building in Ottawa 
for about 16 years. I have built a good many houses through the city. I know the va- 
lue of work, and the mode of measurement of it. Ottawa clay excavation, not exceeding 
six feet deep, is worth 15 to 20 cents per cubic yard, hauled to a spoil bank near. Hock 
excavation to 8 feet SI. 00 per yard, fur the next 5 feet $1.25, next 5 feet $1.50, and 
about the same below that. At these rates the excavator does not get the rock. A toise 
of limestone of 216 feet is worth at the quarry $2.00, and about $2.00 to haul it. I should 
consider such stone as was worth using in the rubble work, worth §2.00 a toise from the 
excavations. The toise of rubble masonry is 72 cubic feet, openings measured under 10 
feet. All walls are counted at 2 feet, although less by this mode, whatever is over is 
cubed, and reduced to the standard of 72 feet. 

Cut Stone is measured on the face, all that is seen on the building is measured. Beds 
joints are not measured, but window jambs are measured, check and all. Rubble stone is 
worth in the walls $5.00 to $5.50 per toise of 72 feet. This would be $3.75 to $4.12* 
per toise of 54 feet. Pick-faced masonry of 1 foot bed, such as I see, is worth 10 cents to 
dress, and the material 17 cents ; 27 cents in all, face measure. The two feet bed stones 
are worth 37 cents, and the work 19 cents ; 56 cents in all per foot, face measure. 



(Signed,) John Rowat. 



John Page, Sworn : 

I am Chief Engineer in the Department of Public Works. I was not consulted in 
reference to the designs of the public buildings at Ottawa, or as to their being contracted 
for, or managed. I had nothing to do with them in the winter of 1860 and 1861. I got 
to Ottawa two or three days before Christmas 1860, and left on the 1st or 2nd March 
1861. 

I am now here in charge of the original plans and papers of the Department in 
reference to them for the use of the Commissioners. I came on the 11th July 1862, and 
have remained since. The copies which I have furnished and certified to the Commis 
sioners of original deeds, letters, papers and plans, in the department of Public Works, 
are true copies of the oiigiuals respectively, and of the endorsements thereon, and correct 
tracings of the contract plans relating to these buildings. 



CS 



Lgnedj) John Page. 



■,f V." 



124 



20th SEPTEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. 0., Chairman, 
Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourqeatj. 

John Henry Patti^on, further examined : 

The quantities of the face work on the sides of the drains and ducts by'my own 
measurement, is 10,917 feet. If the price of 37 cents for this work, allowed at items 
72 and 73, of Mr. Page's estimate is applied, the amount will be $4,039.29. The quantity 
of arched work in the boiler house, soffit measure, is 297 feet, at the rate of $1.75 allowed 
for the arched work in the sewers, would amount to $519.75. I look at item 58, blue 
book, the quantity of cut arches through walls, and in air ducts is 8,018 feet, the pi ice 35 
eents, but as the extension amounting to $10,824.30, would require a rate of $1.35 per 
foot to produce it ; I presume this to be an error in printing the figure 1 for dollar, before 
the 35 being left out, and that the rate is really $1.35 per foot. The measure of these 
arches is 1975 feet, the price by items 74 and 76, in Mr. Page's estimate, $1.35, if ap- 
plied, gives $2,666.25. At item 59, blue book, the quantity of cut arches and inserts in 
sewers, is 14,709 feet, at $1.75 per foot, amount, $25,740.75. The face measure of these 
is 3,157 feet. 

The price I find at items 120, 121 of the Architects estimate $1.75, which rate 
applied to this quantity would amount to $5,524.75. The whole amount allowed for these 
items, 57, 58, 59, is in Mr. Killaly's estimate $47,993.85. The quantities and rates of 
face work, as above given, is $16,498-68, the difference being $31,495.17 for the eastern 
block. I look at item 58, page 413, Blue Book, being the estimate for the western block, 
and I find the quantity of cut ashlar in the boiler house, sewers, air ducts, &c , 26,877 
feet at 40 cents, amount to $10,750. In Mr. Page'c estimate, items 65 and 66, the face 
work in the boiler house is 800 feet at 90 cents, amounts to $720, and 3,131 feet at 78 
cents, amount $2,442.18. The face work to the sides of the sewers and ducts, I find to 
be 7,671 feet, which at the former rate of 37 cents, amounts to $2,838.27. The soffit 
measure of the arched work of the boiler house is 220 feet at $1.75 as above, amounts to 
$385. 

At item 59, Blue Book, page 415, the cut arches through walls, and in air ducts, is 
charged as 6,202 feet at $1.35, amount $8,372.70. Their soffit measvre is 1,950 feet, the 
previous rate of $1.35, if applied, produces $2, 632. 50. At item 60 of Blue Book, page 
415, the cut arches and inverts of sewers is charged as 12,131 feet at $1.75, amount 
$21,229.25. The visible face measure of these is 2,867 feet, the rate $1.75. Item 54 of 
Mr. Page's estimate, if applied, yields an amount of $5,017.25. The total amount of these 
three items, 58, 59, 60, in Mr. Killaly's estimate is $40,352.75. 

The several amounts of these works, or the quantities now given, and the rates named, 
give a total of $14,035.20, the difference being $26,317.55, and if the difference of 
$31,495.17 in the eastern block is added, their joint sum will be $57,812.72 in favour of 
the contractors by Mr Killaly's mode of measurement, and increased prices on the cut 
stone, ashlar in drains, ducts, and boiler houses of the Departmental buildings. In mea- 
suring the brickwork, I made no deduction for flues, but I returned the lineal measure- 
ment of all flues in accordance with my instructions. 

(Signed,) J. H. Pattison. 



m 



18th DECEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT ! 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman. 

Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Commission met for despatch of bnsiness, but adjourned in consequence of the 
non-arrival of witnesses. 



19th DECEMBER, 1862. 



MEMBERS PRESENT : 

JOHN WILSON, Q. C, Chairman. 

Joseph Sheard, Victor Bourgeau. 

Samuel Keeper, Esq., at his own request is further heard on oath in explanation 
of what Mr. MeGreevy said in his evidence respecting the alleged agreement to dispense 
with the schedule of prices attached to the contract : he says, I am surprised to learn 
that Mr. MeGreevy considers he made any agreement with me, in reference to the 
application of the schedule of prices to he attached to the contract, I must only repeat 
that what I stated before in my evidence on this point is true. No such agreement was 
made with me, and none could be made with me, because I was not the official organ of 
the Department, with whom alone such agreement could be made. Had the commissioner 
been absent, and it had fallen to my part to execute the contract, it might then with 
truth be said that I was a party to the agreement, but the Commissioner being present 
for that purpose the Act of agreement is not mine, but his. In his absence I act for him 
as his deputy, and in such cases, am responsible to him for what I do. Here I wish to 
point out the distinction between the functions of an assistant, and a deputy Commis- 
sioner under the public works Act of 1846, and from that time down to the Act of 1859, 
under which I was appointed, the assistant Commissioner, possessed co-ordinate powers 
with the chief Commissioner, and could and did, by his acts bind the Government to his 
engagements, but this not being in accordance with the principle on which the Govern- 
ment was conducted, (the assistant not having a seat at Council,) the law was changed 
in 1859, and the second Commissioner made the Deputy of the first, and instead of having 
co-ordinate powers, was made the subordinate of the Commissioner, and placed in the 
position of a deputy head of a Department, as provided by this Act, and the civil service 
act taken together. He is supposed to carry out the orders of the Commissioner, and 
conducted the business without prejudice to the control of the latter in any matter whatever. 

I say then, that neither in awarding the contract to Mr. MeGreevy nor in fixing its 
terms and conditions, was I the responsible party ; nor was it right that such important 
matters should be intrusted solely to a subordinate in my station. What I did on this 
occasion, and what were my views respecting this affair, can plainly be discerned by 
msfarence to the official documents which have been laid before the commission. My 



1*26 



report on the tender, aud my rcmirks upon the objections raised by the contractor to the 
first draft of contract submitted to him. I refer to the draft contract Exhibit No. 105, 
now put in. My views were given, but they did not in all cases prevail. For these I 
am responsible, but not for the final form of the contract. 

How the extra work was to be paid for according to the understanding that subsisted 
before the final execution of the contract, is to be seen and known, by reference to the 
word " yes", written by me, opposite paragraph No. 10 of the objections raised by Mr. 
McGreevy's legal adviser to the printed clause No. 7, embodied in the first draft of the 
contract. This remark having passed under the cognizance and consideration of the 
Commissioner, without further remark from him, I considered as approved. By this I say 
that it was understood that the extra work was to be paid for, under printed clause No. 
7, (Exhibit No. 31,) according to the measurement and valuation of the engineer or archi- 
tect in charge, which has been the usual practice alwa} r s, and not by any fixed schedule 
of rates, for it is hardly possible to make any schedule that shall embrace all the contin- 
gent works arising out of large contracts such as these. Therefore I say that the attach- 
ing of a schedule to the contract with fixed rates for the extra work, was not in accord 
ance with the written and approved remark of mine. 

The printed form of contract referred to received its present form, and state of per- 
fection from the several attorneys general through whose hands it has passed from 
the period of the Union, down to the present time. I have always considered clause No. 
7, as the result of their combined knowledge and experience, that it was fair and just, 
and could not very well be improved upon or safely departed from. It was however 
designed rather for engineering than for architectural work, though applied to both, but 
the principle of paying the fair value of extra work, according to the estimate of the 
officers of the Department has always been recognized and acted upon. I understood Mr. 
McGreevy took exception to the parties designated, but not to the mode, and it was on 
this point that I opposed him, and that the Commissoner insisted, and it was also in 
reference to the clause, that 1 understood from the Commissioner that he 1ml the differ-, 
ence with his colleagues. 

It followed then that if the usual practice was to be observed in this case, the 
schedule of prices which was well known fed be below the fair value of the work, was not to 
apply to extra work. With respect to the practice of having schedules of prices attached 
to building contracts, I have before said it is usual, but I should add, that it is not the 
invariable practice. 

In order to inform the Commission more fully upon this point, 1" have taken occasion 
to refer to twelve of the leading contracts, which have been entered into for as many 
buildings from 1850 to 1861, and I now put in the notes I have myself taken from the 
originals in the office, (Exhibit 106), giving the names of the buildings, names of con- 
tractors, dates of contracts, and particulars regarding schedules. It will be seen that only 
two out of this number have schedules attached to them, and that one of them ha3 two 
schedules attached to it, one for contract and one for extra work, the latter being at a 
higher rate than the former. In five other cases, schedules or rates were furnished with 
the tender, as called for, and although not attached to the contracts were in effect, adopted, 
and acted on in making estimates for contract and extra works. In one case the schedule 
was made by the architect, pro rata of the contract, and in the remaining four cases the 
only guide for making up the estimate was the printed clause No. 7 of the usual contract 
form. In contracts for engineering works there are always rates and prices given for the 
various kinds of work specified, and if any work is afterwards added, it is provided for 
under clause No. 7, and the engineer fixes the prices. This in my judgment is the most 
satisfactory course, and was followed throughout in the construction of the canals. But 
contracts for buildings are generally made for bulk sums, a practice which seems to possess 
the advantage of simplicity and certainty, but which in reality is neither so simple nor so 
certain as the former, for in the event of any change or addition, all the elements which 
entered into the original calculation of the bulk sum, must be taken into consideration, 
and it becomes very complicated. To avoid this difficulty a schedule of prices is desirable 
for the purpose of making the progress estimates and effecting a final settlement, and it 



127 



would be accepted and applied as just and right by both parties, pro